For 1,473 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 34% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 65% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kyle Smith's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 49
Highest review score: 100 Calvary
Lowest review score: 0 Brother, Can You Spare a Dollar
Score distribution:
1473 movie reviews
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    An appropriately respectful and dignified biopic.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    It's a shame that, after nearly 40 years of writing about rock, Cameron Crowe is receptive to the clichés of the genre.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    If you can overlook Andie MacDowell's Mitteleuropa accent as a Jewish Holocaust survivor (I know: big if), the cinematic roman a clef Mighty Fine has some quiet charms.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    If you're old enough to pluck gray hairs, you may find yourself rubbing away a few tears.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Although it has affecting moments, the film can't quite decide whether it's about aging or about the effects of war on the home front.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Quiet, sober and tense, the movie makes some interesting points -- contrasting the frenzied hookups of the two men with the butcher's rote, dismal lovemaking with his wife as their bodies are carefully hidden under sheets -- but it lacks the emotional firepower of "Brokeback Mountain."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Doesn't have as much behind-the-scenes juice as you'd hope.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    An honorable, sober but completely unnecessary take on the Dickens novel, Great Expectations serves as a fine introduction to the story but won’t excite those familiar with previous versions.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Cusack shows that he can still play the sensitive-but-fun guy until the ladies sigh and the men take notes.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Green rules the picture with her nutty stare and her willingness to get nasty in a hot sex scene, but the movie’s main weak point is the Greek general Themistokles.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    As frightening as it intends to be, but not enjoyably so.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    The Hunger Games may be derivative, but it is engrossing and at times exciting. Implicitly, it argues that "The Truman Show" might have been improved by Ed Harris lobbing fireballs at Jim Carrey, and it's now clear what "American Idol" was missing all those years: a crossbow for Simon Cowell.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Life, Animated oversimplifies the situation, contriving to use endless clips from Disney movies to make a case that movie magic really can better people’s lives. Unfortunately, by the end of the movie it’s clear that Disney can’t help Owen negotiate sex, breakups or many other challenges he faces as an adult.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    A chilling pulp movie told with a pavement-eye view of the dregs of humanity.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Kim Basinger gives one of her strongest performances in Even Money, a kind of "Crash" fueled by gambling instead of racism.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    Watching it is like being the only non-stoned person in the room as someone tells a long, long story.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Kyle Smith
    At last, someone has figured out that there might be laughs in teens trying to lose their virginity.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    The minimalist style keeps the suspense warm. The movie is unusual among teen horror flicks in that it largely avoids the usual cheap thrills and bursts of scare music. Instead, it carefully repeats isolated images and sound bites until they take on a shivery power.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    If it's violence ye seek, and violently confused storytelling, look ye no further.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Japan’s loony suicide culture seems like an adequately scary backdrop for a horror movie, but the routine horror flick The Forest mostly settles for cheap thrills.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    A sort of grown-up version of “Moonrise Kingdom,” France’s Love at First Fight has some youthful free-range charm but not nearly as much as its predecessor.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Ultimately, this throwback, made-for-TV-style film takes the easy way out in a cheesy climax, but its resolute quaintness may appeal to the kind of viewers who regard electricity as disturbingly newfangled.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Despite being named “Gator Bodine,” Franco seems like something Statham would scrape off his boots. Put it this way: Franco needs a baseball bat to be intimidating; Statham just needs to be Statham.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    The movie falls into the same uneasy category as "Eight Legged Freaks": too tongue-in-cheek to be thrilling, not funny enough to be a comedy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    It's a one-joke movie, if "Jewish mothers are annoying" is a joke. But just as a film about boredom should not actually be boring, no movie should credibly simulate the experience of being stuck in a car with Barbra Streisand for eight days.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    The main reason for Winter's Bone to exist is that it delivers a little voyeuristic thrill -- a bit of poverty porno -- for the critics who awarded it their highest honors at this year's Sundance Film Festival.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    The documentary Tabloid shows that an oddball lead character and a smirky style do not necessarily add up to a complete movie.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    In Maze Runner: The Scorch Trials, selfish oldsters scheme to rob young people of their vital essence, sacrificing them in the process. It’s basically “Social Security: The Movie.”
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Strip away the alt-country soundtrack, though, and you've got a Bette Davis fallen-woman-redeemed picture from 1937.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Kyle Smith
    Unbroken, is a cinematic scrapbook, a collection of well-composed scenes practically cut and pasted from “Memphis Belle,” “Chariots of Fire,” “Life of Pi” and “The Bridge on the River Kwai.” Unlike those other films, though, Angelina Jolie’s second effort as a director is more a series of similar events than a story, and lacks an underlying message except that torture hurts.

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