For 1,265 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 0% same as the average critic
  • 67% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Kyle Smith's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 48
Highest review score: 100 American Sniper
Lowest review score: 0 Brother, Can You Spare a Dollar
Score distribution:
1,265 movie reviews
    • 92 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The Coens, so cutting to so many of their characters, are gentler with Llewyn, inviting us to wander and wonder along with him as he ponders why he must forever play the jerk.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Soundly structured, smart and fast, with a plausible central scenario, several gripping moments and well-wrought dialogue.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    RoboCop is topically up-to-the-moment but stylistically it’s retro. Far from using the story as an excuse to string together cheap thrills and blowout spectacle, its hero has all the heart of the Tin Man.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Najafi stages action scenes with an intense, queasy beauty and elevates what is in its outlines a routine crime drama to near-operatic proportions.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    As subtle and careful and slyly disturbing as Child’s Pose is though, it and many others of its genus suffer from an airlessness, pacing like the growth of algae, a dishwater color palate and a dirge-like monotone.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    A wicked little horror film in which nearly all of the violence takes place in your head, In Fear expertly builds terror out of not much more than two people driving around in a car.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Top performances by Guy Pearce and Felicity Jones, though, make the film emotionally rich.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    This Morgan Freeman-narrated documentary doesn’t stray much from the nature-doc formula of making its stars look frisky and winsome while sprinkling in a few info-nuggets about the critters (they’re older than dinosaurs!). And that’s just fine.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    A captivating Tom Hardy is in the driver’s seat for the one-man show Locke, but like many experimental films, this one suffers from its self-imposed constraints.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Based on a lesser-known Dostoyevsky work, Brit director Richard Ayoade’s breathtakingly realized oddity will appeal to fans of David Lynch and the comic surrealism of Terry Gilliam’s “Brazil.”
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The film, like the man, is never boring.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Writer-director Jon S. Baird has devilish fun with the hilarious black-comic elements of Irvine Welsh’s novel, but the incessant bad behavior does get a wee bit monotonous, and the twist ending is disappointingly pat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    A sickening horror parable disguised as a comedy of mores, the Netherlands’ Borgman is a rarity: a genuinely shocking, upsetting movie.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Its young director, however, has a considerable flair for surprise and visual gusto, and he even, on a shoestring, delivers sharp-looking special effects.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    It isn’t quite as clever as it thinks. This is one of those man-written feminist parables that looks an awful lot like a Penthouse art director’s idea of a feminist parable.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Roger Ebert makes an unusual candidate for a documentary: He was a writer, which isn’t cinematic, and not the swashbuckling kind. He didn’t go to war zones, just movies.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    There are enough sharp one-liners and funny situations to keep things entertaining even as Braff delves (lightly) into genuine dilemmas confronting many a married couple.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The attraction between the resolutely empirical scientist and his “spiritual,” hippy-dippy girlfriend gives the film an unpredictable quality.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    In a captivating climax, the movie turns attractively freaky, though somewhat marred by cheesy special effects, and there’s a huge debt to the immense leaps of “2001.” An abrupt ending feels frustrating and leaves questions floating in space. Then again, I’m using only 3 to 5 percent of my capacity, so what do I know?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Nearly as good as the average episode of TV’s “Friday Nights Lights,” which makes it better than most movies and one of the better sports films of recent years.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Yousef’s story, which he retells in the documentary The Green Prince, is one of unimaginable courage and moral awakening.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    The gimmicky title is doubly misleading: The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby is neither a mystery nor Beatles-themed, but it is an elegantly wrought tale of anguish.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Mesmerizing, eerie and unpredictably weird.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Who gets to say what art is? Does honest emotion count for more than cold abstraction? If Andy Warhol likes it, does that make it OK? Big Eyes toys with some amusing ideas, and that’s enough.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Dialogue, we seem to have forgotten, matters, and the words — by the brutally funny screenwriter of “The Departed,” William Monahan — are electric eels, slithering and sinister and nasty. They sneak up and sting you, or sometimes tickle your toes. Lowlifes don’t actually talk this way? Yeah. But if only they did.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    How English is this movie? As English as a cold, rainy day at the beach. As English as the politeness that masks hostility, as English as a pie that contains meat, as English as secretly wishing you lived in some other country.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Though somewhat marred by cheesy docudrama re-enactments, the film (produced by Steven Spielberg’s sister Nancy) is nutty, dramatic, surprising and above all inspiring.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    There should be a word for the friendly rudeness of deli waiters: In the documentary Deli Man, they’re described as being as brusque and familiar with you as if you’re there three times a day — even if they’ve never seen you before.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Yet the film is marred by Hawke’s blundering intrusions as he keeps changing the subject to Hawke: He tells us he often wonders “why it is I do what I do,” as if anyone but he is interested in the answer.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 75 Kyle Smith
    Dryly comic, arch, sleek, and suffused with mood-setting tracks by the likes of X and Depeche Mode, Electric Slide has some of the mordant absurdity of the novels of Bret Easton Ellis. Like its dim hero, it’s going nowhere, but traveling in style.

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