Leah Greenblatt

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For 190 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 87% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 11% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Leah Greenblatt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 75
Highest review score: 100 Beasts of No Nation
Lowest review score: 33 Dirty Grandpa
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 190
190 movie reviews
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    In the Fade is a flawed filmgoing experience, but still a viscerally affecting one.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s a minor-key tale by any measure: a May-December romance played out in the fading shadow of Old Hollywood glamour. But it also has the benefit of a thoughtful script, sensitive direction, and leads gifted enough to breathe fresh air into nearly every moment.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    A smart, eminently watchable thriller, taut and stylish, and Plummer is remarkably good in it.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The result is a dadaist swirl of satire, pie-eyed whimsy, and speculative futurism — like "Gulliver’s Travels" through the wrong end of a telescope.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie never quite stops feeling like Moulin Rouge! written in extra-large block font, or Broadway projected straight onto a big screen, which certainly isn’t bad news if that’s exactly what you love.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    Mostly this is all just pretext for dreamy postcard shots of Europe, a metric ton of slapstick, and as many highly specific vocal riff-offs as one empty airplane hangar can handle.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    The skating scenes, too, are thrilling, but Robbie is the real revelation. In a performance that goes far beyond bad perms and tabloid punchlines, she’s a powerhouse: a scrappy, defiant subversion of the American dream. You won’t just find yourself rooting for this crazy kid; you might even fall a little bit in love.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    It feels only appropriate that James Franco, an actor and director for whom weirdness is next to godliness, would be the one to tell his story.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s real life, heartbreaking and sublime.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The vividness of the narrative never quite matches the riotous swirl of color and culture on screen — and neither do the songs, sadly, for how central they are to the story. Instead, Coco settles into something gentler but still irrefutably sweet: a movie that plays safe with the status quo, even as it breaks with it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    A tar-black comedy so caustic it nearly burns a hole in the screen, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri banks a lot on the gale force of Frances McDormand, and nearly pulls it off.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Thelma doesn’t play with pig’s blood and jump scares; its dreamlike dread is subtler and stranger, and much harder to shake.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Branagh executes his double duties with a gratifyingly light touch, tweaking the story’s more mothballed elements without burying it all in winky wham-bam modernity.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Gerwig doesn’t trap her protagonist in the oblivious underage bubble that most coming-of-age dramedies inhabit; Lady Bird’s parents, played by Tracy Letts and Laurie Metcalf, are fully formed humans with their own deep flaws and vulnerabilities.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    What follows is another slapstick dose of hard-R ridiculosity with a soft-nougat center, but it also passes the Bechdel test maybe better than any other film this year, and its older generation of stars are too smart not to go to town on their stock roles.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    First-time director Maggie Betts has said she based her story in part on extended research into the aftershocks of Vatican II’s new liberties — in its wake, devoted members left the Church in droves — and on personal biographies of the women who experienced it firsthand.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Even a ravishingly shot finale — Queens has never looked so enchanting — can’t quite paper over the weak resolution of the plot’s central mystery.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie does get some fun gory mileage out of its cracked-Pleasantville premise; but mostly it feels like broad farce madly in search of a cohesive center, and a soul.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    There’s something uniquely, transcendently beautiful in Campillo’s particular vision and the unhurried way he unfurls it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    A tasteful, surprisingly sedate biopic slathered in the traditional signposts of heavy exposition, gold-toned cinematography, and note-perfect period detail.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    The story begins to feel more like a series of strung-together anecdotes: an intriguing project, incomplete.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Una
    Una’s raw, deeply dis­comfiting dance between obsession and exploitation isn’t easy to watch by any metric; they make it hard to look away.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    The real draw is seeing these two legends together again.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Even when its emotions risk running as cool as its palette, 2049 reaches for, and finds, something remarkable: the elevation of mainstream moviemaking to high art.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Uneven but endearing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The symbolic power of what happened there — one small step, one giant leap for womankind — is still the movie’s truest ace.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    There’s a raw, tangible humanity to nearly every scene that sets the film gratifyingly apart.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Strong builds a poignant, methodical portrait of loss.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Some of Status’s cringe comedy feels forced or simply wasted on soft targets.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s an artful, quietly affecting piece of filmmaking, more than worth the lessons learned.

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