Leah Greenblatt

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For 63 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 82% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 14% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Leah Greenblatt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 72
Highest review score: 100 The Hunting Ground
Lowest review score: 33 Dirty Grandpa
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 48 out of 63
  2. Negative: 1 out of 63
63 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Leah Greenblatt
    Heartbreaking, infuriating, and unmissable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Leah Greenblatt
    Cary Fukunaga’s stark, beautifully shot drama was likely never meant to be a blockbuster; its brutal account of a child soldier in an unnamed African country is far too discomfiting for wider audiences. It absolutely does belong on a big screen, though, and more important, it just deserves to be seen.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    The portrait that emerges is one of a brash, talented girl who grew up an outcast in her small Texas town.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    As unsettling as Marielle Heller’s feature-film debut can be — there are moments you’ll ache for Minnie and other ones where you’ll want to lock her away — it rings much truer than most coming-of-age stories.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Despite a few too-cute moments (and many fantastically graphic vagina jokes), the movie is both smarter and more sympathetic than that glib shorthand.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s not hard to see why Mustang has been dubbed the “Turkish Virgin Suicides.” Like Sofia Coppola’s dreamy, unsettling 1999 debut, it’s another first film by a young female director that focuses in feverish close-up on the adolescent awakening of five restless, radiant sisters — and the ruin that follows when their family tries to contain it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    An excellently clear-eyed primer on the woman whose talent carried her from an impoverished childhood in Tryon, N.C., to the world’s most rarefied stages—and whose political defiance nearly ended her career.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Blue's raw portrayal of infatuation and heartbreak is both devastating and sublime. It's unforgettable.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Courtenay is a gruff and gratifyingly knotty presence, but in the end it’s Rampling’s movie. In a quiet, beautifully calibrated performance completely stripped of actressy tricks, she’s a revelation.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The East is still a compelling portrait of what gets lost (and found) when a cause becomes an obsession.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    A movie about love and loss that doesn’t dissolve into soft focus when the hard parts start.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    An ill-judged twist pitches the story sideways, but Crudup's performance holds the center. His pain isn't soggy or showy; it just feels true.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Unexpected isn’t particularly interested in driving the plot forward or holding its leads up as avatars for a cinematic lecture on poverty and white privilege. Instead, it just lets them live and breathe and make mistakes — not for the aim of any greater message or grand epiphanies, but because that’s what people do.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Samba finds a much stronger rhythm when it stops contriving and simply shines a light on the joy and pain (and musical interludes) of lives lived in the margins.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Somewhere along the way Earl eases up on the suburban–Wes Anderson whimsy and starts to find its heart, infusing the story’s self-conscious cleverness and trick-shot set pieces with something sweeter, sadder, and even a little bit profound. In other words, it grows up.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s a smart, flawed movie about smart, flawed people.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Sam Elliott, Marcia Gay Harden, and Judy Greer supply sharp cameos, but this is Tomlin’s movie, and she obliges with a spiky, refreshingly unvarnished performance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    PP2 sometimes feels less like a movie than a two-hour episode of Glee ghostwritten by Amy Schumer; jokes fly like they’re being shot from T-shirt guns at a gonzo pep rally, and not all of them stick the landing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie borders on hagiography, but Gordon is a charmingly voluble storyteller; he’s like Dos Equis’ Most Interesting Man in the World recast as a balding Jewish guy from Long Island.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    It's Coen lite, basically, but still filled with their best signatures: cracked humor, indelible characters, and cinematography so rich and saturated you want to dunk a cookie in it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Like the guys who gyrate on La Bare’s stage every night, the movie is luggish, good-hearted, and a little bit sad.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Director Peter Landesman, who also helmed last year’s political thriller "Kill the Messenger", doesn’t color much outside the lines of conventional drama. But his straightforward telling actually serves the strong cast and taut script — and a story that would be deemed too outrageous to believe if it wasn’t true.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Writer-director Angus MacLachlan also penned the acclaimed 2005 indie "Junebug," and he aims for the same kind of gentle absurdity here.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Both Mbatha-Raw and Parker are appealing, expressive actors, and writer-director Gina Prince-Bythewood (Love & Basketball) lets them breathe, filling in the boilerplate bones of the story with smartly nuanced commentary.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The script is wispy, but the performances (including Patrick Chesnais as Caroline’s prideful, devastated husband) shine.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    The result is chilling and beautifully composed, a stylish study of disintegration that is easier to admire than enjoy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    It works its own sort of magic. After all, who doesn't want to believe that the soul does have a window, and that if it closes we might open it again?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    In its own druggy, dick-pic way, it’s also a pretty endearing tribute to male friendship — hammy and crude and more baked than a fruitcake, but with a sweetly squishy holiday heart at its center.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    A quiet, intermittently poignant portrait of two people who've lost each other and aren't sure they want to find their way back.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Lively looks fantastic in every era’s fashion as it passes, and she does a nice job of conveying Adaline’s old-world diction and reserve; there’s no Gossip in this girl.

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