Leah Greenblatt
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For 22 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 81% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 10% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Leah Greenblatt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 71
Highest review score: 91 Blue Is the Warmest Color
Lowest review score: 42 Mortdecai
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 16 out of 22
  2. Negative: 0 out of 22
22 movie reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Blue's raw portrayal of infatuation and heartbreak is both devastating and sublime. It's unforgettable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Despite a few too-cute moments (and many fantastically graphic vagina jokes), the movie is both smarter and more sympathetic than that glib shorthand.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The East is still a compelling portrait of what gets lost (and found) when a cause becomes an obsession.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The script is wispy, but the performances (including Patrick Chesnais as Caroline’s prideful, devastated husband) shine.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie borders on hagiography, but Gordon is a charmingly voluble storyteller; he’s like Dos Equis’ Most Interesting Man in the World recast as a balding Jewish guy from Long Island.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Like the guys who gyrate on La Bare’s stage every night, the movie is luggish, good-hearted, and a little bit sad.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    An ill-judged twist pitches the story sideways, but Crudup's performance holds the center. His pain isn't soggy or showy; it just feels true.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Both Mbatha-Raw and Parker are appealing, expressive actors, and writer-director Gina Prince-Bythewood (Love & Basketball) lets them breathe, filling in the boilerplate bones of the story with smartly nuanced commentary.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Writer-director Angus MacLachlan also penned the acclaimed 2005 indie "Junebug," and he aims for the same kind of gentle absurdity here.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    It's a broad, helter-skelter farce whose best bits hinge almost entirely on the considerable charms of its star.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    It works its own sort of magic. After all, who doesn't want to believe that the soul does have a window, and that if it closes we might open it again?
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    Huppert is a wonder, inhabiting every iota of rage and froideur and helplessness; if only the movie's motives were as lucid as her performance.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie finds real power in its climax, a party that turns into a nightmarish orgy of leering white kids in blackface. And the end-credit photos of real parties just like it at schools across the country are a stark reminder of the ugliness that Dear White People, flawed as it is, wants to confront.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Leah Greenblatt
    A quiet, intermittently poignant portrait of two people who've lost each other and aren't sure they want to find their way back.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    This one has its own wonky charm and intermittent moments of genuine, depraved hilarity; it's like "Bridesmaids" drawn in crayon.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie is disappointingly flat-footed about both rock and journalism, and its shaggy plot sheds logic as it goes. Still, the actors are excellent; they’re triple crème slathered on an odd little undercooked biscuit of a script.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    You won't respect yourself in the morning, but you might have some dumb, lizard-brain fun.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    It's clumsy and wacky and intermittently amusing, and Rob Lowe looks like he's having a great time playing Real-Life Ned Flanders With a Deeply Weird Side once again.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 58 Leah Greenblatt
    Boy's premise reeks of stalker-movie mothballs, and it's too timid to fully dive into the high camp it hints at. Instead, this cookie just crumbles.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 42 Leah Greenblatt
    A raft of fine actors – including Amy Adams, Richard Jenkins, and Downton Abbey’s Jessica Brown Findlay – are wasted in a sour, callow family drama that mistakes constant yelling for emotional tension and fortune-cookie aphorisms for wisdom.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 42 Leah Greenblatt
    Sound titillating? It's not.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 42 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie is too odd and randy to play for kids on an Austin Powers level, and too broad to really work as farce. But Depp, god bless him, fully commits, and finds a few genuinely funny moments amidst all the outsize mugging and mild sociopathy.

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