Leah Greenblatt

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For 131 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 85% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 12% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 11.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Leah Greenblatt's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 73
Highest review score: 100 The Hunting Ground
Lowest review score: 33 Dirty Grandpa
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 1 out of 131
131 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Leah Greenblatt
    Heartbreaking, infuriating, and unmissable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Leah Greenblatt
    Cary Fukunaga’s stark, beautifully shot drama was likely never meant to be a blockbuster; its brutal account of a child soldier in an unnamed African country is far too discomfiting for wider audiences. It absolutely does belong on a big screen, though, and more important, it just deserves to be seen.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    [Taylor] deftly translates the bleak, raw-boned menace and tricky time signatures of Train’s intertwined plotlines, and draws remarkably vivid performances from his cast, particularly his two female leads.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    That’s the movie’s greatest feint, though: Ultimately, it’s far less interested in galactic destiny than the infinite, uncharted landscape of the human heart.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    The portrait that emerges is one of a brash, talented girl who grew up an outcast in her small Texas town.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    As unsettling as Marielle Heller’s feature-film debut can be — there are moments you’ll ache for Minnie and other ones where you’ll want to lock her away — it rings much truer than most coming-of-age stories.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    In its audacious strangeness, the movie manages to do something history hardly ever gets to: surprise us.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    A visually stunning, richly imagined oasis in a sea of candy-colored safety, and one of the first truly original movies of the year so far.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Havana’s crumbling trapped-in-time beauty also plays a starring role, but it’s Medina who provides the movie’s raw, tender heart.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    For the most part it succeeds, gorgeously — though it will probably make anyone over 30 feel either mildly outraged or wildly irrelevant.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Aaron Paul has key scenes as the drone pilot who actually has to pull the trigger, but it’s the late Alan Rickman, as Mirren’s superior, who steals the film.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s like a lost John Hughes movie with Irish brogues and cars that just happen to drive on the other side of the road. It’s also, sadly, exactly the kind of sweet little film that too often gets buried in a box office ruled by broader comedies and bloated superhero epics
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Despite a few too-cute moments (and many fantastically graphic vagina jokes), the movie is both smarter and more sympathetic than that glib shorthand.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    It’s not hard to see why Mustang has been dubbed the “Turkish Virgin Suicides.” Like Sofia Coppola’s dreamy, unsettling 1999 debut, it’s another first film by a young female director that focuses in feverish close-up on the adolescent awakening of five restless, radiant sisters — and the ruin that follows when their family tries to contain it.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Copy celebrates a brilliant storyteller and her lacerating wit...but also recalls a woman who could be bossy, presumptuous, and sometimes mean. To the end, though, she was adored.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Plotwise, Women is a wisp; as a mood piece, though, it’s almost irresistibly rich.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    An excellently clear-eyed primer on the woman whose talent carried her from an impoverished childhood in Tryon, N.C., to the world’s most rarefied stages—and whose political defiance nearly ended her career.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Blue's raw portrayal of infatuation and heartbreak is both devastating and sublime. It's unforgettable.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 91 Leah Greenblatt
    Courtenay is a gruff and gratifyingly knotty presence, but in the end it’s Rampling’s movie. In a quiet, beautifully calibrated performance completely stripped of actressy tricks, she’s a revelation.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Trolls doesn’t reach for the emotional resonance of DreamWorks’ more ambitious efforts; its lessons of loyalty and kindness are standard-issue, and tear ducts remain untapped. Still, the movie’s serotonin pumps like a fire hose. It’s almost impossible not to surrender to the bliss.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The East is still a compelling portrait of what gets lost (and found) when a cause becomes an obsession.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Thankfully, Fremon Craig’s script is smart and sensitive enough not to gloss over the real pain lurking beneath Nadine’s bravado as she deals with the aftermath of her dad’s death, her best friend’s betrayal, and the fact that the right guy (Hayden Szeto) might not be the one with the best bangs.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The movie’s lofty narrative ambitions never quite catch up with its aesthetics, but it’s still a fantastic beast of a film, intoxicating and strange.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    A movie about love and loss that doesn’t dissolve into soft focus when the hard parts start.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    The whole thing is feverishly earnest and more than a little manipulative, but it’s also possibly the prettiest two hours of emotional ­masochism so far this year.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    An ill-judged twist pitches the story sideways, but Crudup's performance holds the center. His pain isn't soggy or showy; it just feels true.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    A big, unabashedly ambitious picture, heavy with the weight of history. But its best moments turn out to be the smaller human ones.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Unexpected isn’t particularly interested in driving the plot forward or holding its leads up as avatars for a cinematic lecture on poverty and white privilege. Instead, it just lets them live and breathe and make mistakes — not for the aim of any greater message or grand epiphanies, but because that’s what people do.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Samba finds a much stronger rhythm when it stops contriving and simply shines a light on the joy and pain (and musical interludes) of lives lived in the margins.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 83 Leah Greenblatt
    Charged with streamlining Figures’ knotty real-life histories, director Theodore Melfi (St. Vincent) tends to paint too much in the broad, amiable strokes of a triumph-of-the-week TV movie. But even his earthbound execution can’t dim the sheer magnetic pull of an extraordinary story.

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