Leslie Felperin

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For 321 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Leslie Felperin's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Manuscripts Don't Burn
Lowest review score: 10 Hector and the Search for Happiness
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 10 out of 321
321 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    This documentary, by the first-time director Jack Pettibone Riccobono, is a deep drink of bleak. But there are incidental moments of beauty or startling surreality to marvel at.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    The film feels a little too eulogistic, too reliant on hyperbole and too in love with its own gimmicks to make it more than just a serviceable crowd-pleaser.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    If the metrics by which you want to measure Love are its brute sexiness and technical panache, then the film is indeed rather extraordinary. Thanks to Noe's regular collaborator Benoit Debie (who also shot such recent visually bravura films as Spring Breakers and Lost River), Love contains some of the prettiest shagging scenes in cinematic history.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    The set-up is a bit schmaltzy and the only guesswork is how bitter the bittersweet ending will be, but Haro coaxes strong performances from the cast.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    Writer-director Attila Till’s plucky comedy-drama isn’t quite the radical representation of disability it seems to think it is, but has its heart in the right place.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    In the end, the material feels a bit attenuated, like a short that’s been stretched to feature length, even if the characters are enjoyable, sympathetic enough company for the pic’s 84-minute running time.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    Hancock's apparently irrepressible penchant for folksy Midwestern types and perky montages dilutes any cynicism or misanthropy that might have given this material the edginess it deserves.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Leslie Felperin
    Although the treacly soundtrack overpunches on the sentiment at times, this is undeniably moving stuff – especially scenes where some of the doctors see footage of patients they helped save, still very much alive and thriving today.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    Mixed-media approach is eye-catching, and the subject is unquestionably powerful, but the sentimental score and stridently drawn imagery detract from picture's impact.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    Fuzzy-headed biopic, which glosses over the former British prime minister's politics in favor of a glib, breakneck whirl around her career and marriage.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    Ultimately, "Renee" feels less like a walk away than a retread.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    A film that admirably tries to remain true to the slightly gritty spirit of its source material. Unfortunately, it also occasionally sprays the wall with maudlin touches and misjudged additions to the story.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    The film’s thudding shocks and predictability dull its edge.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    Picture may not be Scots helmer David Mackenzie's best effort, but it's easily his most lighthearted, a cheery trifle that reps a contrast to his recent pictures, the apocalyptic "Perfect Sense" and U.S.-set comic misfire "Spread."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    Even if one agrees with Jarecki's progressive political position, making Elvis into a metonym for the nation's spiritual corruption starts to feel too much like a contrived rhetorical sleight of hand.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    Aniston submits an honest, sturdy performance. However, the film, directed by Daniel Barnz (Phoebe in Wonderland, Beastly) and written by Patrick Tobin, is less emotionally potent than it wants to be.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    The extemporized feel to some of the dialogue makes their rapport seem all the more credible and consequently there is something open-hearted and friendly about the performers that keeps the film watchable, for all its faults.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    At heart, the film's biggest flaw is that it doesn't seem to have any faith in its audience's emotional intelligence. It effectively neuters all the original story's elusive, poetic, melancholy qualities by spelling things out in capital letters.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    Although director Alan Taylor manages to get things going properly for the final battle in London, the long stretches before that on Asgard and the other branches of Yggdrasil are a drag.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    In sartorial terms, the fabric is to die for, but helmer Whitney Sudler-Smith's documentary follows a banal pattern, while the finishing lacks finesse.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    The result is a superficially handsome crime thriller that doesn't tick, although it's got a pretty, jeweled face, and some clever scripting by William Monahan (scribe of "The Departed"), making his directorial debut here.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    In the end, the film is so guilelessly unabashed about its hokum that it becomes sort of endearing in a way, and one can’t but admire the likes of Cox, McElhone and Toby Stephens as the boo-hiss bad guy for fully committing to the corn.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    Some viewers might find that very cognitive dissonance interesting in itself, but many others may struggle to connect with a story that's essentially about an assortment of extremely entitled, self-absorbed people who ultimately have little new to say about addiction, families or the process of recovery.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    Corny as a vat of polenta, but still rib-sticking enough to satisfy those who like lightly seasoned, easily digestible cinematic starch, Italy-set Love Is All You Need offers a romantic comedy for middle-aged palettes.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    Davis and Kaye’s script lacks the black humor and high-wire comic timing that made The Celebration such a breakthrough, and the antics of the three main leads just become a bit sordid, inexplicable and oddly tiresome by the end, even though the performances are admirably committed.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    There is a decorousness at play here that adds an odd new flavor to the Almodovar repertoire, a politeness that’s quite unlike the lusty vulgarity of the past.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    By sticking so slavishly to the original Blair Witch film’s template, the result is a dull retread rather than a full-on reinvention, enlarging the cast numbers this time but sticking to the same basic beats.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    A Tempest so kitschy, yet curiously drab and banal.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    What's singularly lacking here is any sense of how to use the underage characters, who, apart from one or two, are a barely distinguishable gaggle.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Leslie Felperin
    The sad truth is that, however engaging they are as performers elsewhere, neither Collette nor Barrymore are at their best here.

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