For 1,255 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Dreamgirls
Lowest review score: 0 Dead Man on Campus
Score distribution:
1,255 movie reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    It's one modern film worthy of being called a contemporary classic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Eyes Wide Shut still towers above most of the movies out there, immersing the viewer in a web of emotional complexity, at once raw and personal and, at times, theatrically overcooked.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    There's a giddy, absurd charm to the story, in which the strange setting only enhances the comfortable familiarity of the narrative and characters.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    If nothing else can be said of Dogville, it's a film that is like nothing else.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The best Canadian beer movie since "Strange Brew," and the best 1930s musical of the year, The Saddest Music in the World is the kind of exhaustingly delirious film that only Winnipeg director Guy Maddin could make.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Once in a rare while a film comes along that is boldly original, communicates an important idea in an elegantly simple fashion and happens to be highly entertaining. Such is the case with Moolaadé.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    A great film about a good man.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Poised, delicate, powerful, hovering between poignancy and pealing laughter, it is a feast formed by skill and serendipity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Dreamgirls is one of the best movie musicals in memory.
    • 98 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    This is like no movie you've seen before, a haunting mixture of horror, history and fantasy that works simultaneously on every level.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The adjective “inspirational” doesn't do justice to the quality of Schnabel's film.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Mixing Chaplinesque delicacy with the architectural grandeur of a Stanley Kubrick film, director Andrew Stanton recycles film history and makes something fresh and accessible from it without pandering to a young audience.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    As refreshing as it is to find a movie that leaves you smiling, it's something much rarer to discover a film that makes you think about what a commitment to happiness really means.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The story may stretch credibility until it's ready to pop its seams, but Patel conveys the simple confidence of a prodigy who has learned everything important in life, except how to lie.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    At heart, though, every moviegoer can recognize a love story, no matter how unusual the context.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Funny, fascinating, utterly unclassifiable film.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    There's something about this story, and this war, that brings out the stripped-down conceptual artist in her (Bigelow): Against blank canvases of desert sand and rubble, explosive wires are linked to nerve ends, and everything that matters depends on the twitch of a muscle or a finger on a button.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Hornby is a fine craftsman and his dialogue sparkles, though occasionally the scenes are too calculated.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    A simultaneously realistic and absurdist examination of police work.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Dive into a masterpiece.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    A preening terrorist for the Me generation, his primary drive was vanity and his main professional asset an absence of empathy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Extracting big drama out of small events is Mike Leigh's forte, and with his latest little masterpiece, Another Year, the English director pushes himself to the extreme.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    This outing not only doesn't disappoint; it surpasses high expectations. This is a terrific, smartly designed adolescent adventure, visually rich, narratively satisfying, and bound to resonate for years to come.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The story of a man afflicted with fearful visions, Take Shelter is a film that's hitting the right apocalyptic trumpet call at the right time.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Le Havre, offers the director's usual humour, pitch-perfect acting and compassionate message, with a Gallic twist that should win new converts.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    As well as an engaging fable about a homeless orphan living in a train station, Scorsese's film is a richly illustrated lesson in cinema history and the best argument for 3-D since James Cameron's "Avatar."
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    With elements of "A Star Is Born" and "Singing in the Rain," The Artist is a rarity, an ingenious crowd-pleaser.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Mostly, though, A Dangerous Method is a suave chamber piece: a series of glimpses of two 20th-century intellectual titans, in friendship and separation, and the story of a remarkable woman who history had swallowed up, brought into the light again.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    If the word masterpiece has any use these days, it must apply to the film Once Upon a Time in Anatolia, a mature, philosophically resonant work from Turkey's leading director, 53-year-old Nuri Bilge Ceylan (Climates, Distance, Three Monkeys).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    As with his previous film, director Chang nurses a compelling drama from a multilayered cultural reality, at once intimate and unfathomably large in implications.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Shot in Louisiana, with non-professional actors and apparently set-designed from a junkyard, Beasts of the Southern Wild marks one of the most auspicious American directorial debuts in years.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Like Stanley Kubrick's "Eyes Wide Shut," Anderson's latest is enigmatic. But if you have eyes and can see, The Master it is unmistakably some kind of wonder. At least, it's an exhilarating demonstration of big-screen moviemaking in dreamlike colours and a sense-heightening 70-mm format.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    No
    Take the backroom political machinations of "Lincoln," add in the showbiz sleight of hand of "Argo," and you’ll get something like No, a cunning and richly enjoyable combination of high-stakes drama and media satire.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Gravity, a weightless ballet and a cold-sweat nightmare, intimates mystery and profundity, with that mixture of beauty and terror that the Romantics called the sublime.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Far from the push-button catharsis offered by most Hollywood redemption tales, the work is sober and deliberate, a mix of visceral intensity and artful design.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Mostly, Nebraska impresses for its sure rhythms and artful balance of comedy and melancholy, resulting in Payne’s most satisfying film since "About Schmidt."
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    What keeps the energy percolating is DiCaprio’s performance, in the loosest and most charismatic turn of his career.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Their excitement is infectious and the entire endeavour both mind-bending and tremendously human: Near the end, Peter Higgs, the recent Nobel Prize-winner and one of the scientists who first predicted the particle back in 1964, is seen in Switzerland watching the data results come in, while a tear trickles down his cheek.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Linklater’s film is very much its own hybrid creature. While the dramatic scaffolding is lightly drawn, it becomes apparent that Linklater has organized his material along certain themes, most notably that of the passage of time and the dream life of childhood.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The documentary of the year may also be its most hair-raising thriller.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The triumph of Foxcatcher is not in the subject but in its art. The clear-eyed compassion and moral intelligence of Miller’s film brings sense to the senseless, and finds the human pulse behind the tabloid shock. It’s not a movie to make you feel good, but, at moments, it reminds you what goodness is.
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Performances are still the heart of Leigh’s work, and at the heart of this film is an extraordinary performance by Leigh’s frequent collaborator, the British actor Timothy Spall.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Hackman is unexpectedly hilarious. With protruding top teeth and a professorial beard, he's a motormouth, badgering and abusing one minute, wheedling and fawning the next.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Skip work to see it at the first opportunity.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The best American movie so far this year.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Polanski's view of life is like that of Greek tragedy, with the same cold comfort that tragedy implies; from the larger perspective which art gives us, we know even horrors eventually pass.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    May not have the most sophisticated narrative, but it is one of the most spectacular and masterly demonstrations of animation in screen history.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    "You're so lucky to live in Mexico," Luisa says. "Look at it -- it breathes with life." So does Y Tu Mama Tambien, both the pant of passion and shuddering sigh of regret.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The movie isn't just about Schmidt as a personality, it's a portrait of his world, and Payne and co-writer Taylor show a rare compassion for the superficially comfortable.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    A little like speeding through the digestive tract of some voracious beast. There's bite, acid, digestive churning and an expulsive conclusion. If the metaphor seems unsavoury, well, wait until you see the film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    A beautiful, probing art documentary.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Pure cinematic intoxication, a wildly inventive mixture of comedy and melodrama, tastelessness and swooning elegance, bodies with the texture of fresh peaches, and angular faces Picasso would have loved.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    One of the most original, good-hearted comedies in a long time, Rushmore is the sort of movie where the strangest sequences of discords somehow keep managing to reach giddily improbable resolutions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    No film this year has offered quite the cerebral tickle, weird invention and slaphappy gusto.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    One of the most original, and certainly among the best-acted films this year, 21 Grams focuses on people on the verge of dying, having survived death or grasping at the slender threads of new lives.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    As in "Taxi Driver," the protagonist is a damaged war veteran, an invisible man who travels about the city and internalizes its contradictions until he explodes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Jonathan Demme's potent adaptation of Morrison's novel may be substantial, but it is also engrossing, a movie that plays at times like a combination of “Gone With The Wind” and “The Exorcist.”
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Serves to champion human irrepressibility and unpredictability. It's the flip side to the defeatism of "Distant," but with parallels, both in the very deliberate pacing and moments of visual wit.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Giddily impudent in its execution, pummelling in its message, To Die For is finally a comedy black enough for the tabloid television age.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Yes
    Ultimately, Potter's fable is about how a catastrophe forces us to ask what we believe and why.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    A movie that gets wonderfully under your skin.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Compelling, disturbing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Ghoulishness and innocence walk hand-in-hand in Tim Burton's Corpse Bride, a movie that digs into Hollywood's past to resurrect the antique art of stop-motion animation and create a fabulous bauble of a movie.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The feeling is like a warm homecoming.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Death, torture, humour and even budding eroticism -- now this is more like it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Can a little-read 18th-century literary masterpiece be food-spittingly funny? Can it also include contemporary English actors riffing about their bad teeth, getting drunk and kissing their personal assistants? The answer is yes, as long as you agree that the best way to adapt an original book is with a correspondingly original film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Sensual and scary, the movie is so visually textured you feel as though you're brushing against the screen.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Iraq in Fragments already stands up as a classic war documentary, in its unusual poetic form and by its extraordinary access to the lives of ordinary Iraqis.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The first 20 minutes of the South Korean film The Host represents one of the most entertaining movie openings in memory. It's the same kind of pop-culture thrill provided by Steven Spielberg's "Jaws," with the same sense of astonishment, fear and pleasure at something genuinely new.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Forman's treatment is another matter entirely - infinitely more subtle and, using the intrinsic bias of film, far more naturalistic. [18 Nov 1989]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    A film rich in paradoxes. Much of the film's style is dreamy, from the snow-covered Ontario landscapes suggestive of a blanket of forgetfulness, to Julie Christie's pale, intoxicating beauty, to the ambient musical score.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    A French rat as a master chef? Absurd. But a brilliant French chef with an American accent? C'est grotesque!
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Both the most bewildering of the three movies and also the most brutally compelling.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    That's not to say that There Will Be Blood isn't something exceptional; it's just that the movie is jarringly erratic, ranging from moments of delicacy to majesty to over-the-top bombast.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Though Burton's version is faithful, the filter of his sensibility has turned it into another of his necrophilic creepshows.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Relentlessly dark but expertly rendered, it shares its cinematographer and quality of aggrieved compassion with another recent Romanian art house hit, "The Death of Mr. Lazarescu."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Much of what happens in Silent Light can feel painstakingly mundane: milking cows, harvesting wheat, a long drive at night in and out of shadows. Yet throughout, there's a sense of something ominous impending, and while it remains gentle, the ending is genuinely startling.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Tense car chases, action scenes handled with crisp panache and Canadian actor Ryan Gosling channelling Steve McQueen as an existential wheel man add up to make Drive one of the best arty-action films since Steven Soderbergh's "The Limey."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    In the entrancing frames of Career Girls, nothing extraordinary happens and everything is revealed. [26 Sep.1997, p.E8]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Captain Phillips manages to expose us to a few things that are unusual in a thriller, including sympathy for the enemy and, in Hanks’s performance, the frailty that is the other side of heroism.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The winner of Cannes’s top prize, the Palme d’Or, and the international critics prize at the same festival, the film was hailed as a breakthrough, a graphic and emotional love story, the first same-sex feature ever to win the Palme, in the week after France legalized same-sex marriage.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Her
    Phoenix, for long scenes, is onscreen by himself, lost in his thoughts and those of the operating system moulded to fit his psyche. With his wounded awkwardness and boyish giggles, he seems authentically vulnerable, but the character’s emotionally arrested development also begins to weigh the film down.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The character of Rosalyn – a mash-up of Carole Lombard, Lady Macbeth and maybe even Regan from The Exorcist – is by far the most hair-raising phenomenon in a movie bristling with high hair.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    From the start, it’s clear Anderson is working with a new sophistication both in the vocabulary and structure of the film’s voiceover narrations.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Only Lovers is so fluidly edited and thinly plotted that it feels almost off-hand; yet, it’s also made with great care, beautifully lit and set-designed to an eyelash.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Here’s another word for Gone Girl: “meta.” It’s a word Flynn uses, which means it’s a thriller about thrillers, and a narrative about narratives, especially the form of domestic violence relished by current-affairs television shows.

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