For 1,281 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Mr. Turner
Lowest review score: 0 I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell
Score distribution:
1,281 movie reviews
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Mixing Chaplinesque delicacy with the architectural grandeur of a Stanley Kubrick film, director Andrew Stanton recycles film history and makes something fresh and accessible from it without pandering to a young audience.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    It's one modern film worthy of being called a contemporary classic.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Faithful to Chekhov, Ceylan spells out nothing except that unhappiness unrecognized is unhappiness compounded, and despite the film’s wintry chill, there’s a thrilling warmth in this struggle to shine a light on life.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The story may stretch credibility until it's ready to pop its seams, but Patel conveys the simple confidence of a prodigy who has learned everything important in life, except how to lie.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    At heart, though, every moviegoer can recognize a love story, no matter how unusual the context.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    A simultaneously realistic and absurdist examination of police work.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    A great film about a good man.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    As refreshing as it is to find a movie that leaves you smiling, it's something much rarer to discover a film that makes you think about what a commitment to happiness really means.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Extracting big drama out of small events is Mike Leigh's forte, and with his latest little masterpiece, Another Year, the English director pushes himself to the extreme.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    There's something about this story, and this war, that brings out the stripped-down conceptual artist in her (Bigelow): Against blank canvases of desert sand and rubble, explosive wires are linked to nerve ends, and everything that matters depends on the twitch of a muscle or a finger on a button.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Their excitement is infectious and the entire endeavour both mind-bending and tremendously human: Near the end, Peter Higgs, the recent Nobel Prize-winner and one of the scientists who first predicted the particle back in 1964, is seen in Switzerland watching the data results come in, while a tear trickles down his cheek.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Linklater’s film is very much its own hybrid creature. While the dramatic scaffolding is lightly drawn, it becomes apparent that Linklater has organized his material along certain themes, most notably that of the passage of time and the dream life of childhood.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    As with his previous film, director Chang nurses a compelling drama from a multilayered cultural reality, at once intimate and unfathomably large in implications.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Funny, fascinating, utterly unclassifiable film.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Gravity, a weightless ballet and a cold-sweat nightmare, intimates mystery and profundity, with that mixture of beauty and terror that the Romantics called the sublime.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Hornby is a fine craftsman and his dialogue sparkles, though occasionally the scenes are too calculated.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The triumph of Foxcatcher is not in the subject but in its art. The clear-eyed compassion and moral intelligence of Miller’s film brings sense to the senseless, and finds the human pulse behind the tabloid shock. It’s not a movie to make you feel good, but, at moments, it reminds you what goodness is.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    If nothing else can be said of Dogville, it's a film that is like nothing else.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The documentary of the year may also be its most hair-raising thriller.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Shot in Louisiana, with non-professional actors and apparently set-designed from a junkyard, Beasts of the Southern Wild marks one of the most auspicious American directorial debuts in years.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    The adjective “inspirational” doesn't do justice to the quality of Schnabel's film.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    There's a giddy, absurd charm to the story, in which the strange setting only enhances the comfortable familiarity of the narrative and characters.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Dive into a masterpiece.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Once in a rare while a film comes along that is boldly original, communicates an important idea in an elegantly simple fashion and happens to be highly entertaining. Such is the case with Moolaadé.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Mostly, Nebraska impresses for its sure rhythms and artful balance of comedy and melancholy, resulting in Payne’s most satisfying film since "About Schmidt."
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Sissako’s point, while never heavy-handed, is hard to miss: Traditional Muslims are among the world’s biggest victims of Islamic militarism.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Mostly, though, A Dangerous Method is a suave chamber piece: a series of glimpses of two 20th-century intellectual titans, in friendship and separation, and the story of a remarkable woman who history had swallowed up, brought into the light again.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Like Stanley Kubrick's "Eyes Wide Shut," Anderson's latest is enigmatic. But if you have eyes and can see, The Master it is unmistakably some kind of wonder. At least, it's an exhilarating demonstration of big-screen moviemaking in dreamlike colours and a sense-heightening 70-mm format.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    As well as an engaging fable about a homeless orphan living in a train station, Scorsese's film is a richly illustrated lesson in cinema history and the best argument for 3-D since James Cameron's "Avatar."
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    Performances are still the heart of Leigh’s work, and at the heart of this film is an extraordinary performance by Leigh’s frequent collaborator, the British actor Timothy Spall.

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