For 1,255 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 The Artist
Lowest review score: 0 The Mod Squad
Score distribution:
1,255 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    A movie that gets wonderfully under your skin.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Compelling, disturbing.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Ghoulishness and innocence walk hand-in-hand in Tim Burton's Corpse Bride, a movie that digs into Hollywood's past to resurrect the antique art of stop-motion animation and create a fabulous bauble of a movie.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The feeling is like a warm homecoming.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Death, torture, humour and even budding eroticism -- now this is more like it.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Can a little-read 18th-century literary masterpiece be food-spittingly funny? Can it also include contemporary English actors riffing about their bad teeth, getting drunk and kissing their personal assistants? The answer is yes, as long as you agree that the best way to adapt an original book is with a correspondingly original film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Sensual and scary, the movie is so visually textured you feel as though you're brushing against the screen.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Iraq in Fragments already stands up as a classic war documentary, in its unusual poetic form and by its extraordinary access to the lives of ordinary Iraqis.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The first 20 minutes of the South Korean film The Host represents one of the most entertaining movie openings in memory. It's the same kind of pop-culture thrill provided by Steven Spielberg's "Jaws," with the same sense of astonishment, fear and pleasure at something genuinely new.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Forman's treatment is another matter entirely - infinitely more subtle and, using the intrinsic bias of film, far more naturalistic. [18 Nov 1989]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    A film rich in paradoxes. Much of the film's style is dreamy, from the snow-covered Ontario landscapes suggestive of a blanket of forgetfulness, to Julie Christie's pale, intoxicating beauty, to the ambient musical score.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    A French rat as a master chef? Absurd. But a brilliant French chef with an American accent? C'est grotesque!
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Both the most bewildering of the three movies and also the most brutally compelling.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    That's not to say that There Will Be Blood isn't something exceptional; it's just that the movie is jarringly erratic, ranging from moments of delicacy to majesty to over-the-top bombast.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Though Burton's version is faithful, the filter of his sensibility has turned it into another of his necrophilic creepshows.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Relentlessly dark but expertly rendered, it shares its cinematographer and quality of aggrieved compassion with another recent Romanian art house hit, "The Death of Mr. Lazarescu."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Much of what happens in Silent Light can feel painstakingly mundane: milking cows, harvesting wheat, a long drive at night in and out of shadows. Yet throughout, there's a sense of something ominous impending, and while it remains gentle, the ending is genuinely startling.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Tense car chases, action scenes handled with crisp panache and Canadian actor Ryan Gosling channelling Steve McQueen as an existential wheel man add up to make Drive one of the best arty-action films since Steven Soderbergh's "The Limey."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    In the entrancing frames of Career Girls, nothing extraordinary happens and everything is revealed. [26 Sep.1997, p.E8]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Captain Phillips manages to expose us to a few things that are unusual in a thriller, including sympathy for the enemy and, in Hanks’s performance, the frailty that is the other side of heroism.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The winner of Cannes’s top prize, the Palme d’Or, and the international critics prize at the same festival, the film was hailed as a breakthrough, a graphic and emotional love story, the first same-sex feature ever to win the Palme, in the week after France legalized same-sex marriage.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Her
    Phoenix, for long scenes, is onscreen by himself, lost in his thoughts and those of the operating system moulded to fit his psyche. With his wounded awkwardness and boyish giggles, he seems authentically vulnerable, but the character’s emotionally arrested development also begins to weigh the film down.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    The character of Rosalyn – a mash-up of Carole Lombard, Lady Macbeth and maybe even Regan from The Exorcist – is by far the most hair-raising phenomenon in a movie bristling with high hair.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    From the start, it’s clear Anderson is working with a new sophistication both in the vocabulary and structure of the film’s voiceover narrations.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Only Lovers is so fluidly edited and thinly plotted that it feels almost off-hand; yet, it’s also made with great care, beautifully lit and set-designed to an eyelash.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Here’s another word for Gone Girl: “meta.” It’s a word Flynn uses, which means it’s a thriller about thrillers, and a narrative about narratives, especially the form of domestic violence relished by current-affairs television shows.

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