For 1,321 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 42% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 55% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 WALL-E
Lowest review score: 0 Vacation
Score distribution:
1321 movie reviews
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    This is a no-cable, no-wake-up-call, cash-only dump of a film, where you breathe through a hankie and bring your own Lysol.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 0 Liam Lacey
    Just how dumb is Senseless? So dumb it even takes the fun out of stupid.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 0 Liam Lacey
    About as much fun as being given a wedgie and hung from the camp flagpole, Daddy Day Camp is an unnecessary sequel.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    George Huang's Swimming With Sharks purports to give us the goods on the big bad egos who run Hollywood, but it lacks both credibility and coherence. [06 May 1995]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The movie seems much, much longer than its 90-minute running time. [15 June 1998]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    All the silliest racist cliches are perpetrated: the dark people with their dark magic; British actress Cathy Tyson, as a Haitian psychiatrist who is occasionally possessed by demons and lapses into frenzied love-making; evil third world politics hand-in-hand with black sorcery. [5 Feb 1988]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    One of those non-stop jabbering cartoons in which most of the lines sound like the spontaneous riffs from a couple of comics sitting around a diner.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The result is as off-putting as biting into a confection in which the sugar has been replaced by salt.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Old Dogs is offensive mostly because it wastes time.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    This is a movie that was made not because the director had anything to say, but because she wanted to get a movie made. Even at that, the script is slapdash. Only one character has any dimension (Frances O'Connor's Mia), the plotting is the usual sub-screwball comedy with obligatory pranks and misunderstandings, and the overall tone is bland, smug and connivingly cute. [11 Apr 1997, p.C6]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    It's difficult to say who is more misguided here: the men (director, screenwriter and producer) who made the movie, or the women who signed on to play the parts.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    The film moves from cliché to cliché and hemorrhages blood and logic at an alarming rate.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    There's no doubt the cast is driven and talented; some day, it might be interesting to watch a film about what such kids are really like.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The movie's dated, stereotypical comedy often contradicts its wholesome intentions, coming across as laboriously cutesy and occasionally perverse.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Through it all, actress Posey strikes attitudes and preens across the glib surface of the film, and though her campy excesses are tolerable for a brief time, the performance becomes an exercise in overkill. [13 Oct 1995]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    At 70 minutes, this groin and groan comedy seems almost dismissively short, but don't believe the myths you've been told: longer is not always better.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The problem is that director Wayne Wang seems deaf to the tonal differences between coming-of-age, magic realism and children's comedy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    There's are nagging problems with the script, which feels like it has lost a few pages during its rewrites. Instead of an orderly, inexorable pressure of events, we get a surfeit of red herrings, followed by the rather uninteresting killer simply stepping out of hiding.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The script is definitely mediocrity mixed with complication.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    They are singing the jingle in the bath, in bed, in the car, ready to send you, like George, smack into a tree.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Call it Nancy Drew and the Case of the Confused Adaptation.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The results are so listless, dated and characterless.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    While the pale skin tones (bronzer is selectively applied) and haphazard mix of American and British accents is distracting, it barely scratches the surface of Exodus’s ungainly artificiality.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    A determined romantic comedy with a theme, and damned if it won't see it through.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    After a while, it begins to feel like a confused comedy: How to explain to the neighbours that your dead husband has moved back home?
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    The film is a mawkish mess, only occasionally alleviated by the performances or Shange's poetry.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Some movies just bring out your inner Matlock: a desire to grab young punks by the lapels, smack them against a wall, knock their cigarettes to the ground and wipe the sneers off their faces. Such is the case with the callow and cynical The Rules of Attraction.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Every character is like the hyperactive rat-squirrel Scrat, and the audience is bounced around like his elusive acorn.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Though Lillard's excitable tone keeps promising wild comic adventures, the sequences are uniformly flat and humour-free.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    So what's Hanson exploring this time? His boring side, apparently.

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