For 1,252 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Happy-Go-Lucky
Lowest review score: 0 Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd
Score distribution:
1,252 movie reviews
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Ranks as one of the most elaborate, stunt- and effects-filled summer movies currently in the theatres. Unfortunately for its box-office prospects, it's also in Russian, which narrows its audience to action junkies with a foreign film bent.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though it's undoubtedly ingenious, for such a clever movie, it's a shame Rubber couldn't be more fun.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Feels like a bloated mass of data without much coherence.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Truly strange, and often captivating.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Think of it as "Cheers" without the beer, or "Friends'" Central Perk with razors and sharper dialogue.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The first 45 minutes of this film feel like far too much normal and not nearly enough para.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Fortunately, director-writer Marc Lawrence (he also created the Hugh Grant-Sandra Bullock comedy "Two Weeks Notice") manages saccharine saturation by tempering his stars' familiar appeal with enough dry wit to make this low-key romantic comedy a not-too-sticky Valentine's Day offering.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the time we reach the climactic ending, the script clearly calls for an exorcist with a chainsaw to trim back this metaphor run amok.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 100 Liam Lacey
    If nothing else can be said of Dogville, it's a film that is like nothing else.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    While Bettany and Dunst are both appealing, their chemistry lacks much fizz. As it is, the pair seem less like lovers than bouncy transatlantic cousins.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A wildly convoluted, preposterous vampire flick that is understood best as a sardonic social allegory.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A bit of a docu-mess.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The movie's last two minutes, in which they all do goofy dances and have no dialogue or script to get in their way, is easily the highlight. It's the previous 113 minutes of plot that cause problems.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Although a couple of performances here may earn Oscar nominations, by the time you’ve sat through the wreckage, you’re left with the sense that this really must have worked better onstage.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    With more superheroes, more action and more stuff blowing up than ever before, X-Men: The Last Stand has the climactic oomph that suggests a finale, though not the gravitas to suggest a resolution.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The trouble with Cosmopolis, David Cronenberg's faithful-to-a-fault adaptation from Don DeLillo's 2003 novel, is that it's more metaphor than meat.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Richard Curtis, the writer of "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Notting Hill" and "Love, Actually," goes off-shore and out of his depth with Pirate Radio .
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Along with its allegorical elements, The King is also impressively specific in naturalistic detail.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Hard Candy not only trips along a tightrope line between exploitation and art; in some ways, that line is its subject.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What is puzzling is how Edward Zwick has taken an extraordinary real-life story about a handful of people who defied huge odds, and turned it into an utterly conventional war movie.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Exist as extended videos for the accompanying soul and rap soundtrack.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    While Baron Cohen's lanky physical slapstick and verbal manglings are funny, the movie begins to feel like one of the later, worn-out Pink Panther movies.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    When the larger question cannot be answered, the lesser one -- "What would you have done?" -- seems beside the point.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie becomes an American salute to military patriotism, anybody's military patriotism. Think of it as "A Few Good Reds."
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Shot in country fields and interiors of fading Georgian glory, Easy Virtue has enough traces of Coward's wit to keep you hoping for the first hour or so, but then the film collapses under the weight of too many misguided innovations.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    With the bigger story and more fully developed relationships than the previous films, this is the first Twilight film that feels like a real movie in its own right.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Actually a pretty entertaining movie, in a kick-you-in-the-pants kind of way. A relative rarity -- a solid no-brow comedy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Spiritual V-8 juice.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The problem is, there's just not enough Burton in Big Fish.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It attempts to take local history of the illegal whisky trade and raise it to the level of myth.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It tries too hard too early.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    It's difficult to say who is more misguided here: the men (director, screenwriter and producer) who made the movie, or the women who signed on to play the parts.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Prime seems aimed at prime-time television, with endless iterations on the same theme of "frustrated relationship" that will finally get resolved during sweeps week in the season before cancellation. Call it: My Mama, the Shrink.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Musically, it's a mixed bag -- The concert remains more of an historical curiosity than a must-see rock film.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    In this fitfully engaging, but often patience-straining preamble to Hobbit adventures to come, there is one transporting 10 minutes of screen time. It happens when Bilbo meets the freakish, ring-obsessed creature Gollum.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The movie begs for a a third-act showdown but, instead, the dramatic tension is allowed to leak away.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    There's something genuinely exploratory and original here in the depiction of people being pushed into adulthood before they're ready.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The film, shot in black-and-white at canted angles, suggests an R-rated Twilight Zone episode with a twist of Fellini-lite, in a trite film school kind of way. Mickey Mouse is unlikely to be shaking in his big yellow shoes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Schreiber has one major casting coup in Eugene Hutz, the New York-based Ukrainian/Gypsy/Punk musician who plays Alex.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The result is an erratically funny but often frustrating comedy, with an interesting premise hobbled by internal inconsistencies and uneven writing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    So blatantly contrived it could be called The Fast and the Spurious, Crank has the small saving grace of being intentionally ridiculous. The action sequences are more notable for their outrageousness than their visceral power.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The movie ends up exactly what it sounds like: a good film for filling the midnight slot at a review cinema or genre festival.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    At its simple core, Sleeping Beauty is a perfectly pitched chamber piece about the menace of voluntary oblivion.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Some of the later scenes capture the spirit of majestic sweetness of "Close Encouners of the Third Kind" and "E.T: The Extra-Terrestrial" period, but the elevated moments don't last. They're relentlessly undermined by the f-bombs, groin kicks, and anal-probing jokes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    It's a workmanlike, passably engrossing horror flick that copies well from the Japanese original. When it's good, it's not original, and when it's original, it's not so good.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over, is still offbeat, but more in the sense of unco-ordinated than syncopated.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The sickly feeling that Body of Lies leaves at its conclusion isn't just about the brutality of its subject; it's the realization that real-life barbarism translates so easily into adrenaline kicks for the multiplex.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A tart-coated sugar pill of a movie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The plot's larcenous resolution is something of a cheat, tying things up dramatically if unethically.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The lanky action star of the cult television series "Alias" is assigned a tired playbook in this film, but she finds room to manoeuvre in a performance that exceeds expectations.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    For all its generally judicious choices, there's one device in The Boys Are Back that may test the patience of some viewers. Every once in a while, the late Katy pops up in a scene to offer Joe wifely advice.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Although veteran choreographer Yuen Woo-Ping ( Kill Bill, The Matrix) handles the wire action, the camera work is merely okay and the sequences are on the familiar side. Still, it's fun to see Chan resurrect his loopy, staggering "drunken master" fighting style.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    In its second half, the movie tips into familiar Gallic farce territory before settling for a formulaic sentimental kicker. As middling comedies go, the French approach has certain virtues. If good wine and long talks with friends can't prevent the inevitable, at least they make the waiting more tolerable.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Blend sound with sight, though, and the package becomes more difficult to take.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    From time to time, as Alexandre Desplat's insistent score surged yet again while the characters rushed by, I found myself wanting the movie to slow down. Some of these images are too beautiful to disappear so quickly.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Actor Liev Schreiber’s voice-over narration is filled with sonorous urgency, but as the film’s commentators acknowledge, some ideas are a hard sell: How do politicians and regulators convince the public on the benefits of a financial diet when a spending spree sounds much more fun?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    So long as you grit your teeth and keep your eyes on the screen, it’s an enjoyable, if almost academic, exercise in bad taste.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    There are a thousand ways you can imagine My Life Without Me going gruesomely wrong but, somehow, it doesn't.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    No political tract, but it can be surprisingly bold.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With seemingly twice as much action, a whole new complex of villainy, competing Iron Man suits, robots and love interests, Iron Man 2 sequel cashes in hard on the unexpected success of the first Iron Man from 2007 and somehow loses much of its soul in the process.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Just who is Pixar aiming this movie at? Contemporary children or their great-grandparents?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Not exactly a movie in the usual sense, not exactly a ride, Journey is more of a virtual theme-park simulation and possibly a milestone of immersive entertainment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    When it comes to rude comedy, one person's caviar is another's smelly fish gunk. A case in point is Strangers With Candy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Although overplotted and underexplained, the movie is rich in memorable lairs.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Almost a comedy, though not an entirely successful one: It's too acerbic to be funny and too detached to be really moving.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Distinctly middling, London-set romance.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    What's right about Horrible Bosses is less easy to identify, but it comes down to something like esprit de corps. The three principal actors click. The looseness of the structure actually proves a benefit, allowing Bateman, Sudeikis and Day, all trained on television comedy, to bounce off each other, talk over each other and apparently pull lines out of the air.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    After a decade of silence, surely Hollywood can do better.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The problem with Flash of Genius is that a windshield wiper is an awfully thin mechanism on which to hang a feature movie.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Although the film and the actors keep on looking good, this solemn, soppy, fantasy has nothing to say about science or faith.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    As with his other costume farce, "Stage Beauty" (with Billy Crudup and Claire Danes), Hatcher produces more froth than zest.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Bring on the sequel please, because, as fine as Denzel is, director Antoine Fuqua’s The Equalizer is not so good – a self-consciously stylized, stop-and-start hodgepodge of Death Wish street vengeance, Bond-style Russian villainy, and moodily shot Boston locale.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Guy Ritchie's Holmes reboot feels both too complicated and too elementary, dear Watson.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Utterly preposterous but so full of enthusiasm and flashy style that it's entertaining anyway, The Brotherhood of the Wolf is like the platypus of genre films.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Jonathan Demme's potent adaptation of Morrison's novel may be substantial, but it is also engrossing, a movie that plays at times like a combination of “Gone With The Wind” and “The Exorcist.”
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Kingdom is a barely coherent compendium of Middle East fantasies, fears and doubts.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Imperfect, but certainly provocative.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The Corruptor is visually lively and filled with gratuitous destruction. [12 Mar 1999]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Morlando's approach, influenced by interviews with the real Boyd in his old age, is cerebral and melancholic. The tone is more foreboding than suspenseful.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Human Nature's zigzag ingenuity wears out some time before the farce bounces slowly to an uneven conclusion. For all its highfalutin title and corkscrew narrative, the movie turns out to be not much more than a shaggy human tale.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Every hero needs to be revitalized by a little humiliation, and for at least the first 40 minutes of Die Another Day, Bond's dressing-down seems to do him and the movie franchise a world of good.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie meanders on and on, like a bad sexual dream, until you finally wake up mumbling: Stella, please: leave that groove thang alone.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Waters's rude, lewd and occasionally nude extended skit takes a simple idea and beats it limp.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    On the downside, Rosebraugh’s own film is too self-righteous and his attempts to play a humour-challenged, lightweight version of Michael Moore in front of the camera is a misfire. The climate-change deniers are comforting, though obviously wrong. Greedy Lying Bastards is grating, even if it’s right.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Like the writings of William Burroughs or Quentin Tarantino's "Pulp Fiction," Watchmen falls into the category of what might be called meta-pulp, a multilayered fiction that serves as a parody and commentary on our collective bottom-feeding fantasies.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Leatherhead's a comedy of stock setups and kooky digressions in which nothing really comes to a head, and running at close to two hours, it lacks the essential brevity of the form.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    For all its treacly excesses of the post- "Full Monty" era, British comedy hasn't entirely lost its teeth yet.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    The film moves from cliché to cliché and hemorrhages blood and logic at an alarming rate.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It's a combination that seems ideal for 10-year-old boys who adore violence, and could well be the cornerstone of the next DreamWorks franchise.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The art of the classic Hitchcockian thriller is about style, pace and misdirection – and though Unknown is occasionally baffling and involves running and car chases, the film rarely manages to thrill.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Essentially an affectionate and personal project to honour Thompson's memory, The Rum Diary occasionally strains to evoke the journalist's surreal black humour.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Hereafter is unpredictable enough to be consistently watchable.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There's plenty here to keep summer comedy fans satiated, if not entirely satisfied.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Like the comic stars of the silent era, Mr. Bean's character transcends language barriers.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Like a lot of things about Zack and Miri, the porn title feels like it's trying too hard.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The larger shell game here is that Edge of Darkness is offered as a political thriller, but with real-world politics removed. What we’re left with is a familiar mechanism for delivering a vicarious, violent, wish-fulfilment fantasy, with Mel in a familiar position, in the driver’s seat, pedal to the metal.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Exuberantly campy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Whom is this movie for, really? It's too tame for the whooping crowds of women who made hits of the "Sex and the City" movies and "Bridesmaids." And for sure it isn't for parents with kids. You can probably find them, diaper bags in the aisles and toddlers on their laps, watching "Dr. Seuss: The Lorax."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Here are a few adjectives that do not apply to the new Superman movie: Beguiling. Frisky. Nuanced. Quiet. Even the title, Man of Steel, sounds too flighty for this film. Man of Lead, or Man of Plutonium, maybe.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Yes
    Ultimately, Potter's fable is about how a catastrophe forces us to ask what we believe and why.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Feels like one of those misguided high-school-teacher exercises in making literary history sound contemporary.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For all the talent involved, The Eye of the Storm is an incident-stuffed but lacklustre affair – a case of lots of sturm, but not enough drang – that reaches for a satiric sting and emotional depth it never achieves.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The old carnival phrase "Close, but no cigar" comes to mind when watching The Brothers Bloom , a globetrotting heist film that starts off terrifically and then progressively deflates.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Even at three hours, the film feels truncated, which raises the question of whether the entire adaptation exercise might have chosen the wrong form. Stretched out to 10 or 12 hours on cable television, Cloud Atlas, the series, would be the talk of the fall television season, and the stories, rather than the thematic scaffolding, would be the right focus of attention.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The title – Hugh Hefner: Playboy, Activist and Rebel – is fine as far as it goes. But if you leave out "octogenarian mammophile" and "calendar fetishist," you leave something essential out of the story.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    In the end, Eagle vs. Shark represents a convincing triumph for Dumb.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    An efficiently engineered piece of studio product, enjoyable enough at times, but with an unmistakable assembly-line quality.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    There's no doubt the cast is driven and talented; some day, it might be interesting to watch a film about what such kids are really like.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 88 Liam Lacey
    Forman's treatment is another matter entirely - infinitely more subtle and, using the intrinsic bias of film, far more naturalistic. [18 Nov 1989]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    With a multiracial cast, an international spy-caper flick with "Mission Impossible" and John Woo overtones, and a series of comic turns, fantasy sequences and sly humour, it should be a fresh delight. Unfortunately, it's not.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There are the usual gaggle of embarrassing friends, a lot of voice-over and montages, a wedding, a funeral and wait … something’s missing. Oh, right. Hugh Grant.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The movie's dated, stereotypical comedy often contradicts its wholesome intentions, coming across as laboriously cutesy and occasionally perverse.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As it exists, Tenacious D in the Pick of Destiny is strictly for the tenaciously devoted.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Hoary, rather than whore-y, Irina Palm is shameless only in its mawkish sincerity.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Overall, it pushes its "love is good" message with such insistence, so many cheery pop tunes, airport hugs, coincidences and teary smiles, that it feels like one long commercial. Surely love is a desirable enough commodity that it doesn't require such a hard sell.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    There are flashes of excitement in this film, mostly from the verbal play and sulphurous humour of Welsh's perspective, but there's a lot that makes you wonder why you're sitting through it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    There's a surprising sweetness in the bond between the two cops. The gay subtext of the partnership is used for humour but it's never sniggering or mean.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Promised Land is a low-budget effort, far too awkward and contrived a drama to change many hearts and minds.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    While paying lip service to the spirit of invention and adventure, the movie doesn’t do much for the evolution of children’s animated entertainment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    In its mocking but acutely observed style, Hobo is a well-designed cinematic mess: There are whiplash jump cuts, patches where the sound almost disappears, and the whole thing is projected in a queasy, faded Technicolor.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The whole thing has all the spontaneity of high-school morning announcements.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Through it all, actress Posey strikes attitudes and preens across the glib surface of the film, and though her campy excesses are tolerable for a brief time, the performance becomes an exercise in overkill. [13 Oct 1995]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    In the world of pulp movies, where horror, westerns and Asian exploitation borrow and blend with each other, there's a point where the cross-genre mishmash begins to feel like gobbledegook. That's definitely the case with Sukiyaki Western Django.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    In a few sound bites, we get the picture and the picture's motto: the smug and selfish coast is an order of disaster-flick toast waiting to burn.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Redford hasn't moved too far here from an earlier political-thriller template: With its skulduggery, late-night meetings and the contemptuous political cabal out to thwart justice, The Conspirator can be thought of as "All the President's Men – The Lincoln Edition."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Rarely have I seen a movie which made me feel more skeptically Canadian. Please -- it's not true that you can do anything. Stop trying. You might make things worse.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Invincible lacks Herzog's usual visual and intellectual panache, and is afflicted by weak English-language acting, which makes it more of a career curio than a major work.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It might better be titled The Awkward.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Grandly overblown and deeply cornball.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A painfully predictable movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Much of Dodgeball feels competent but lazy. The nerds are barely distinguishable, except for one who thinks he's a pirate and says arghh a lot to no humorous effect.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Artistic originality is not so common a commodity that you can afford to get too fussy about the details.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    These Stooges-like antics are more about showing what good sports his stars are than honing any real satiric edge.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    One distraction is that everything feels smothered in an extra helping of déjà vu sauce: another movie featuring a middle-aged misanthrope with a dewy younger woman; another film with stage magic as a theme.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Director Joel Schumacher has pulled no mawkish punches, wringing every drop of emotional potential from the script (adapted by screenwriter Akiva Goldsman from John Grisham's popular novel) down to the last manipulative glance and close-up. Call it A Time to Overkill.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Though it's a good-looking flick with some smart acting and a few flashy runs, it barely breaks even dramatically, and feels, overall, like a good chance wasted.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The current postcard from abroad is not great, but not grating.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    An Eddie Murphy comedy that's actually endearing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The narrative of Lonesome Jim pokes about aimlessly, trying to mine nuggets of amusement.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Thanks for Sharing might best be described as being like Steve McQueen’s sex-addiction drama, "Shame," if it were rewritten by Neil Simon at his most schmaltzy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Pandora’s Promise is less an exploration of the subject than a well-constructed sales pitch.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The director veers off course and heads straight for mediocrity. It's a disappointing ride.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Near the end of the movie, Django jokes that, after the protests, people may still not know what the WTO is, but "they know it's bad." That's a fair summation of how much insight Battle in Seattle provides for its viewers.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Full of falling rain, fluttering silk, John Williams's music and whispery voiceover, Memoirs of a Geisha is one long oxymoronic exercise in attempting to show delicacy through overkill.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Allen's best effort since 1999's "Sweet and Lowdown," but that's not saying a lot.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Mixes broad slapstick and off-hand one-liners in a sometimes surprisingly funny mixture.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    As a psychological thriller, it's not so much either thrilling or psychological as it is wonderfully absurd. [25 Mar 1982]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Fascinating, even when it's fascinatingly bad.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    At 70 minutes, this groin and groan comedy seems almost dismissively short, but don't believe the myths you've been told: longer is not always better.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Iron Lady is a performance in search of a film.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    But it is bright, smart, sometimes wickedly funny, and crisply performed to the point where the acting seems richer than the script.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Somewhere between profound and ludicrous, kind of like a cross between "Waiting for Godot" and "Dude, Where's My Car?"
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    One of those comedies that is more peculiar than actually funny.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The problem is that director Wayne Wang seems deaf to the tonal differences between coming-of-age, magic realism and children's comedy.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    This is a no-cable, no-wake-up-call, cash-only dump of a film, where you breathe through a hankie and bring your own Lysol.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    There's are nagging problems with the script, which feels like it has lost a few pages during its rewrites. Instead of an orderly, inexorable pressure of events, we get a surfeit of red herrings, followed by the rather uninteresting killer simply stepping out of hiding.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The script is definitely mediocrity mixed with complication.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Gospel music not only saves Darrin's plastic yuppie soul -- Praise the Lord -- it also gives an otherwise wasted hour and a half some warmth and buoyancy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The principle suspense is wondering when the suspense is going to start, as you scan the darkly-lit screen looking for any hint of imminent horror.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A mixed bag of old-school and contemporary horror tricks that occasionally raises a hair prickle of intrigue.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is a freakish creature, with lush, painterly animation inspired by Dutch and Flemish masters, attached to a convoluted, gloomy narrative punctuated with scenes of sadism that rival "The Dark Knight."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The result is an offence-free, mild entertainment in which everyone from cast to scriptwriter seems to be winging it.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    To be very generous toward the filmmakers' intentions, Beowulf & Grendel might be seen as a misguided attempt to lend some modern nuance to a traditional tale of good and emphatic evil. But why pussyfoot? The movie is a lumbering and ludicrous mess.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Hathaway may be in a royal rut, but the tiara seems to fit.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    They are singing the jingle in the bath, in bed, in the car, ready to send you, like George, smack into a tree.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Directed by Brian Percival, best known for his work on "Downton Abbey," the film has the similar quality of a well-appointed historical soap opera.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Call it Nancy Drew and the Case of the Confused Adaptation.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Brooks is always a dry vintage, so the lack of outright laughs is to be expected. But Looking for Comedy is more depressing than funny.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Give Quarantine credit: Without resorting to computer-generated monsters or supernatural explanations, it uses consistent logic and confinement to find new ways of being scary.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the final act, involving possibly the most far-fetched scheme since Dr. Evil aimed his death ray at Earth in "Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me," the indifference has become completely contagious.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Rather than invoke sympathy, the technique creates annoyance with Harris's writing: Sure, these characters may be clichés, but haven't they suffered enough?
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Piranha 3D is more funny than disgusting, even when screen fills with half-nude swimmers, bobbing like human dumplings in a roiling vat of borscht. This isn't just sick, it's clas-sick!
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This might be tolerable if Nair hadn't missed the central point, that Becky Sharp isn't sharp like spice, she's sharp like a razor.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Less “amazing” than persistent.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Rent, for all its good intentions and sensitivity, is easy to forget but easy to forgive. The music and direction feel generic but the cast deserves credit for squeezing every possible drop of emotion out of the material.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With the two American actresses miscast, and the two young British lads behaving like a couple of "Brideshead Revisited" rejects, most of the dramatic heavy lifting is left to veteran English actor Wilkinson.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Silly, and unashamedly second-hand, the movie is essentially a Jack Black movie without Jack Black, which is, arguably, an improvement.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is nothing if not anxious to please. There's a big, diverse, celebrity voice cast – Maggie Smith, Hulk Hogan and Dolly Parton as well as Caine and Osbourne.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    All in all, Australia is so damnably eager to please that it feels like being pinned down by a giant overfriendly dingo and having your face licked for about three hours: theoretically endearing but, honestly, kind of gross.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    All this holding back is a bad idea, especially as the subject of an entire movie.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The results are so listless, dated and characterless.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Touchy Feely seems poised to explore the same issues of embarrassing intimacy Shelton mined in her two last films, Humpday and Your Sister’s Sister. But here there’s a new fantastical element, the kind of magical device that might pop up in a minor Woody Allen film.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The shipwreck comes too late to rescue movie from endless banalities. [02 Feb 1996]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Again, as with "Star Wars," the interest lies at least as much in the set design and costumes as the narrative.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    [The soundtrack] manages to serve up new rock, eighties dance music, rap and Barry Manilow -- a combination custom-made to annoy audiences of all ages.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Formula action films don’t come much more formulaic that this.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The movie is a series of ever more elaborate fight sequences and increasingly more and larger opponents.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Tilting between a teen sex comedy and a more sensitive tale about male bonding, The Wood is too anxious to please to quite make up its mind what it is.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is one of those ludicrous, semi-offensive, semi-entertaining potboilers that feels as if the script were dragged out from someone's naughty-book stash.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Though superior to the original Blade, the superiority is mostly in the myriad ways the "suck-head" enemies can be blown up, melted and dismembered.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Bean falls well short of a work of genius. Indeed, the unbearable slightness of Bean feels like nothing so much as a betrayal of the television series on which it is based.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A sporadically amusing, occasionally off-putting French farce.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There are scenes that may make your stomach feel uncomfortable for a moment but rarely stories that will upset your equilibrium.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Ultimately, the performances carry the film.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    He [Salles] has managed to create a movie that's pretty bleak for a Hollywood -- especially Disney -- thriller. His theme, as a director, is the indignities of poverty and, in his way, he pays more attention to that agenda than he does in generating any real thrills.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Queen Latifah's energy may be winning and her self-reliance message righteous, but Last Holiday grossly overextends her credit
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Throughout, Wilson and Byrne play these parts straightforward and there's an undercurrent of real anguish in the struggle of parents coping with a child's long-term care.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The important things first: It's always a relief to come out of an Adam Sandler movie without a case of hives, and you can comfortably attend Anger Management without prophylactic antihistamines.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    One of those headed-for-cable oddities that must have sounded like a good idea at the time.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    A determined romantic comedy with a theme, and damned if it won't see it through.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    While the pale skin tones (bronzer is selectively applied) and haphazard mix of American and British accents is distracting, it barely scratches the surface of Exodus’s ungainly artificiality.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A well-cast drama that switches between sweetness and menace, the film goes down easily, thanks to a talented cast.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though competent in its B-movie way, Terminator Salvation lacks the humour, heart-tugging moments and visual pleasure that made the first two movies of the series modern pop masterpieces.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the film’s end, one can’t help thinking that the story would be better served by a well-researched documentary on the real-life MFAA division (monuments, fine arts and archives.)
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is the stage experience documented on film, from the perspective of someone sitting front row centre watching actors pitching for the back rows of the balcony.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is a comedy at cross-purposes -- by turns low-key, bombastic, mildly amusing, manically slapstick. At least there are the fart jokes as a connecting thread.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    While both the scenery and star Diane Lane are highly watchable, the movie is pure froth, a plate-sized helping of zabaglione.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Too silly to be taken seriously, it's not silly enough to overcome skepticism.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A movie with a double-crossing intelligence plot that's so generic it's an irritating intrusion in a lively chase through the streets and shantytowns of Cape Town, South Africa.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Even with dyed hair, heavy makeup and a cigarette dangling from her bottom lip, Portman still looks like a schoolgirl pretending to be somebody's mom.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    I can’t pardon Labor Day’s mush, not just because it’s mush, but because it comes with an unappetizing side order of condescension and contempt.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Sincere performances and the beautiful gold-and-grey Donegal landscape can only go so far in A Shine of Rainbows, a family film that risks drowning in its own syrup.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Though this RoboCop can’t come close to capturing the clever-silly audacity of the original, one area in which the current film easily surpasses it is in the quality of the cast.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Filmmaker Evan Jackson Leong, who began following Lin when he played for Harvard, also emphasizes the importance of Lin’s tight bonds with his family and the importance of his evangelical Christianity (“I only play for God,” Lin says).
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What promised to be a teen screwball comedy with a supernatural twist soon descends into special-effects overkill and camp acting from the overqualified supporting cast.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    A demanding blend of spectacle, drama and exposition of ideas.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though it is shaped as a woman-in-peril thriller about obsession, Cherish is about being winningly kooky, not violently insane.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie begins to feel more like a buffet of contrivance than a feast of love.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The word "arachnid," as it's said so contemptuously in the movie, begins to sound suspiciously like "Iraqi," and indeed, we soon see the elite bugs are hunkered down in their desert fortress, resisting the mighty air assaults of the Federation. The conclusion of our story involves unearthing the chief bug.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    While it’s fine for a director to explore his childhood inspirations, you hope he would bring something a bit more personal to it. Instead, Jack the Giant Slayer, while well-crafted, feels entirely generic.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Feels like a period film in clumsy modern-day dressup.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Taken for what it is – a fluffy, intergenerational farce as a frame for some seventies musical nostalgia – Mamma Mia! just gets away with it, in spite of director Lloyd's lack of cinematic inexperience.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Simultaneously salacious and sugary.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    After a while, it begins to feel like a confused comedy: How to explain to the neighbours that your dead husband has moved back home?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    If you're going to a no-frills action film, though, at least you want the action to be entertaining, which is where Transporter 3 falls down.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A good-looking but anecdotally slight dramedy about life and lifestyles in Los Angeles's hip Silver Lake district.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Audiences can watch any number of similarly talented comics on late-night television or, even better, get close to the action at a downtown comedy club.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The film walks the fine line between exploitation and empathy to cast a chilly, memorable spell.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As angst-filled as if it were "Amadeus" and "Lust for Life" rolled into one.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A meditation of life, death, reincarnation and biblical symbolism that feels peculiarly like a head-shop poster, blown up to feature-movie size.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    This fluffy escape flick, directed by Ivan Reitman, is a TV sitcom plot grafted onto a travel brochure.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Ultimately, the movie is not, to paraphrase the U.S. Army slogan, all that it could be. The climax is uninvolving generic eye candy, and the sequel-friendly coda is unconvincing.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Once again, perhaps the most impressive effect is Patrick Stewart as Captain Picard, using his Shakespearean training to make long mouthfuls of nonsense sound almost persuasive.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For its last third, the entire thing gets a Frankensteinian head transplant, and turns into derivative serial-killer nonsense.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The less you know about Shakespeare, the more you're likely to enjoy Anonymous.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The Human Scale uses plenty of globe-hopping examples to make up for what it sometimes lacks in depth.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For a screwball comedy, it takes a long time to wind up, and Kline's Frenchman is an outright cartoon. But Ryan manages to hold attention. [6 Oct 1995, p.C2]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Duke rarely operates at more than a TV movie-of-the-week level of originality, but Hoodlum is still an easy movie to enjoy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Periodically, thanks to the 3-D, a long and pointy object emerges from the screen, threatening to impale the viewers through their eyeballs, enhancing the movie's guilty pleasure by reminding us that we, too, are made of vulnerable flesh and bone.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    The film is a mawkish mess, only occasionally alleviated by the performances or Shange's poetry.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Some movies just bring out your inner Matlock: a desire to grab young punks by the lapels, smack them against a wall, knock their cigarettes to the ground and wipe the sneers off their faces. Such is the case with the callow and cynical The Rules of Attraction.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A passable romantic dish, a good-looking, old-fashioned date movie set in an idealized Greenwich Village, evocative of the better Woody Allen films.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The script's attempt to splice together a fumbling love story with a portrait of toxic personality disorder feels incongruous, like a serving of porridge flambé au whisky.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Every character is like the hyperactive rat-squirrel Scrat, and the audience is bounced around like his elusive acorn.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    More entertaining than Mission: Impossible or the last Bond film, Goldeneye, it brings back the humour and sang-froid that makes the genre work.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The question is, is the interspecies wrestling match really worth the ineptly acted spy antics, the big flatulence jokes and Steve-o's endless grandstanding? Not without a handy remote control with a mute button, it isn't.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Not terribly funny. When it does strain for humour, it opts for Farrelly brothers-style gross-outs -- vomit and chewed food and blocked drains -- which makes the movie itself seem like some kind of undigested expulsion rather than a well thought-out idea.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    World-weariness is not really the energetic star's best driving gear. Nor are declarations of menace intended to identify Jack Reacher as a modern-day mythic avenger. When he tells an enemy, through his clenched choppers, "I mean to beat you to death and drink your blood from a boot," the effect is, unintentionally, popcorn-spitting funny. Talk about overreaching.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Most of the cast range from tolerable to appealing (especially Molina and Pena), with a conspicuous exception. Debra Messing, as the career-driven outsider, is consistently stilted.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Though Lillard's excitable tone keeps promising wild comic adventures, the sequences are uniformly flat and humour-free.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    This is the kind of film where the audience has to sort through the sequences, like visiting the green grocer's: liked that bit, can do without those.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    By the head-scratching dénouement, the "perfect" in the title seems particularly misplaced. How about Dial M for Muddle.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    As the careening cars go splat, splat, splat, the director's vision of the future looks like a cheerfully mindless combination of two extremes of carnival entertainment: demolition derby and whack-a-mole.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Whatever the narrative shortcomings, these characters have the warmth of antique painted storybooks, unlike the eerie plastic simulation of Pixar characters.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There’s a fine line sometimes, as "This is Spinal Tap" reminded us, between stupid and clever. Now You See Me wobbles along that tightrope for much of its running time.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What doesn't work so persuasively is Elkoff's script, particularly the overuse of voice-over.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Low, mean and depressingly plausible.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    So what's Hanson exploring this time? His boring side, apparently.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Seems overstuffed and, in its own way, preachy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    With a curiously stubborn kind of integrity, Tron: Legacy follows what did and didn't work the first time – another weak story with sub-B-movie dialogue, partly compensated for by intensely conceived geometric design and special effects.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    It's no great thing, just a better Thing than expected.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 0 Liam Lacey
    This is the sort of movie that ends up awash in sincere revelations, and not a moment of it feels remotely believable.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Awkward in ways both intended and not, the fourth feature from author and director Rebecca Miller is an attempt at a comic change of pace for the usually earnest Miller.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Performances, over all, are a mixed bag; Zeta-Jones does a fair, if incongruous, impersonation of a forties vamp, while Chandler and Pepper do well with limited screen time. As usual, Wright, as a Machiavellian police commissioner, transcends so-so-material to establish himself as the most complex character in the film.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The cast is so oddly interesting you wish you could see them doing something less wasteful
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There are so many events here but no real story. Perhaps that is what's making the drowned kabuki ghost so irate: She's desperate to find a coherent script.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The trouble is that Antichrist feels progressively symptomatic of a director losing heart.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A high-pedigree, low-interest affair that serves mostly as an exercise in postmortem speculation: Why is a project with so many prominent names attached to it so sterile and lifeless?
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Short, flashy and about as complex as a beer belch, Men in Black II is also brisk. The film clocks in at 88 minutes total running time, and it's loaded with new special effects and monsters.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The major problem with Around the World is that there's just not quite enough Chan, or at least the Chan we want to see, which is the acrobatic clown.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the conclusion, the movie turns into the ursine answer to "Free Willy," veering dangerously close to New Age parody: Free your inner bear -- and begin to heal from the last time you got mauled.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Overall, Stalingrad is a bizarre concoction, part Putin-era patriotic chest-thumping and part creaky war melodrama, all set in a superbly recreated ruined city.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    One of those international co-productions full of good intentions and blandly polished results.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Lyrical, dreamy and too complicated for its own good.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Unassuming only in its title.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Having seen the TV series "Hogan's Heroes," we already know that a German prisoner of war camp can be cartooned; Hart's War goes further as a cartoon that takes itself seriously.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Has a deliberately minimalist, retro look to it as well.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The superiority of the musical sequences, and laziness of the writing, creates a dynamic where you find yourself wishing the characters would shut up and dance.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The differences between the two movies are, first, that Scoop is a comedy and, second, unlike "Match Point," it's not very good, as Allen also returns to pre-Match Point mediocre form.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Director David Dobkin, best known for comedies such as "Shanghai Nights" and "Wedding Crashers," demonstrates his serious intent mostly by paint-by-numbers psychology and a ponderous pace.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Too often, the script collapses into what feels like improvisation, in which the characters find a kind of common ground: Infantilism.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A spring-autumn romance that comes with side helpings of local colour and melodramatic backstory.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    A high-school talent show, no doubt, but, at its best, well worth glorifying.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    At almost 21/2 hours, Divergent is repetitiously brutal and drab, with sets that resemble warehouses and industrial junkyards; the action rarely emerges into the daylight before the climactic gun battle.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is a preholiday trifle that’s mildly risqué and a lot sentimental.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Ultimately, his (Silver) film settles for a queasy mix of high-toned intentions and commercial compromises.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    At each stage of the romance, the movie digresses with a series of swing-and-miss gags, often with an abusive twist.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    At least as perplexing as it is creepy, with a time-jumping narrative, a chain of barely connected characters and an enraged shape-shifting ghost.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With its jazzy saxophone noodlings during the opening credits and its bruised black-and-blue look, it's so quaintly and conventionally pulp that you feel like filing a report with the cliché police.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Aside from Jones’s broadly entertaining performance as the egotistical Supreme Commander, the movie, directed by Peter Webber (The Girl with the Pearl Earring), is a dud.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    The problem is that Chicken Little settles for what's expedient and safe and, over all, lives down to its title.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Chloe is director Atom Egoyan’s foray into the realm of what might be called artful trash. This is a high-toned erotic thriller, handled with style and some emotionally raw scenes, aiming for an effect that’s pleasingly unnerving, if not outright arousing.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Frankly, if I were Mrs. Claus, I might be looking for Santa Clause 3, outlining the grounds for annulment.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Big, lavish and dumb as camel spit -- is proof that sometimes it's better to let sleeping genres lie.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    The only pressing burden in this deep interior world is the question: What in or on Earth is a cast this good doing in a movie this ridiculous?
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Unlike Sacha Baron Cohen's rude semi-documentary satires (Borat, Bruno), I'm Still Here never finds a satiric justification for all this grotesque behaviour.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Pretty limp, and works far better in theory than practice.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though complete redemption of Brown's fiction may not be possible, Howard's new film at least represents an upgrade from a mortal to a venal movie sin.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    Though Sandler's resemblance to a pro athlete is indiscernible, his mockery of authority and his penchant for buffoonery and slapstick violence make him more of an heir to Reynolds than might be expected.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Liam Lacey
    A first film from director Mark Palansky, written by sitcom veteran Leslie Caveny (Everybody Loves Raymond, Mad About You), and the two are obviously indebted to the fanciful imagination of Tim Burton.

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