For 1,291 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Boyhood
Lowest review score: 0 Daddy Day Camp
Score distribution:
1,291 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Abramovic is a sensationally attractive narcissist and the filmmakers are clearly smitten with her, but the film goes a long way to establish the intellectual seriousness and dedication involved in her ambitious series of art stunts.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The Runaways captures the sleaze and innocence of the era and has some still-relevant things to say about the conflict between girl-rocker empowerment and exploitation.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Sure, it's a bit mechanical, but what did you expect? The important thing is that the characters and jokes don't prevent you from grooving on the pleasures of the moving parts.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    While the story, shorn of its supernatural elements, is mired in abuse and tragedy, its effect is sensual and superficial.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Kimberly Reed’s debut documentary, Prodigal Sons, would make a terribly contrived novel, but is a compelling and sensational real-life story.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Ten
    Ten may strain your patience but that's the high-stakes gamble of this provocative project.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    A demanding blend of spectacle, drama and exposition of ideas.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    At its simple core, Sleeping Beauty is a perfectly pitched chamber piece about the menace of voluntary oblivion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    With the bigger story and more fully developed relationships than the previous films, this is the first Twilight film that feels like a real movie in its own right.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    A father-son academic rivalry provides fodder for this caustic comedy set in the Talmud Department of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The title comes from prosecutor Ferencz, who compares his work to that of the 16th-century astronomer Tycho Brahe, who said he watched the sky so future generations could use him as their foundation.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    An odd and irresistible documentary.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    By the end of the The Spectacular Now, you’re not quite ready to let these characters go. Instead, like director François Truffaut did with his character Antoine Doinel in a series of films, you want to check back with them every few years, to see how how they’re getting on.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    A twofold story of heroic achievements and personal failings.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Both an homage to his dad and a backstage story rich in Hollywood lore.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Director Scott, flashy, fluid and at his best in the steely-blue claustrophic battle-training scenes, immerses the viewer in the process.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    You have to feel pleased just for the existence of a film like Tim Burton's Frankenweenie. A 3-D, black-and-white, stop-motion animated film, it's a one-man blow for cinematic biodiversity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Alps, in spite of its title, is a very flat film, from the shallow focus photography, to the actors' monotone delivery.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The excesses are easy to forgive, both for the humour and charisma of Rourke's outsized performance and Aronofsky's canny low-key direction, which make for a combination that is irresistible.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Surprisingly touching and funny.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Somewhere between profound and ludicrous, kind of like a cross between "Waiting for Godot" and "Dude, Where's My Car?"
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Subtly crafted and compelling, but it suffers from a case of split personality.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The voice that jerks out from Levy's throat suggests Lazarus waking from the dead.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Korean-American actor and former model Yune (who played a similar role in "Die Another Day," the last Pierce Brosnan James Bond film) makes a colourful villain – handsome and insufferably assured, and also an unchivalrous sadist who kicks around the Secretary of Defense (Melissa Leo in a pageboy wig) as though she’s a hacky sack.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Like Martin Scorsese's "The Departed" or James Gray's "We Own the Night," The Town is a deliberately old-fashioned melodrama that echoes the pulpy mix of violence and romanticism of gangster films of the Thirties and Forties.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The focus of Invictus is less on Mandela's psychology than his willpower and political astuteness.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Like the blues, you feel it first, and think of the meaning later.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Go
    Like circus acrobats who bounce up smiling, the characters end up on their feet, and you realize in retrospect that they survived because somebody, finally, stopped to think. A final thought on Go: Go.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    What's before our eyes suggests we share the planet with some amazingly strange beings.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The strengths of Fugitive Pieces are its fluidity and subtlety. Emotional repression may be one of the most difficult conditions to portray honestly, and Dillane's performance of Jakob is a study in the art of creating sympathy by not asking for it.

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