For 1,290 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Toy Story
Lowest review score: 0 I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell
Score distribution:
1,290 movie reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Ultimately, his (Silver) film settles for a queasy mix of high-toned intentions and commercial compromises.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A painfully predictable movie.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Instead of a madcap farce, the movie grinds along into a series of laboured comic bits.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Providing expectations are kept low, there’s some fun to be had in the elaborately preposterous action set-pieces, and especially Jason Patric’s campy performance as the movie’s villain.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Most of the personality work in the film is left to Steve Zahn.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Having seen the TV series "Hogan's Heroes," we already know that a German prisoner of war camp can be cartooned; Hart's War goes further as a cartoon that takes itself seriously.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As it exists, Tenacious D in the Pick of Destiny is strictly for the tenaciously devoted.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Gruesome enough; what it lacks is a distinctive revolting personality of its own.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Overall, Stalingrad is a bizarre concoction, part Putin-era patriotic chest-thumping and part creaky war melodrama, all set in a superbly recreated ruined city.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A try-anything, fitfully amusing muddle that wears its mocking cynicism a bit too proudly.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Great cast, too bad about the movie.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Almost everything about this starring vehicle for Katharine Heigl feels borrowed from some previous romantic comedy.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With its wry tone and mild emotional disturbances, In the Land of Women is less a chick flick than a chick flicker.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A screwball comedy about the abortion issue? First-time writer-director Alexander Payne gives it a college try.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    [The soundtrack] manages to serve up new rock, eighties dance music, rap and Barry Manilow -- a combination custom-made to annoy audiences of all ages.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The larger shell game here is that Edge of Darkness is offered as a political thriller, but with real-world politics removed. What we’re left with is a familiar mechanism for delivering a vicarious, violent, wish-fulfilment fantasy, with Mel in a familiar position, in the driver’s seat, pedal to the metal.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It's the most jumbled and tonally confused movie yet.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Just who is Pixar aiming this movie at? Contemporary children or their great-grandparents?
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The style here is much more in the spirit of the smash and slash of the Conan movies than the banter and computer-generated monsters of the Mummy movies.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    One of those headed-for-cable oddities that must have sounded like a good idea at the time.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Not terribly funny. When it does strain for humour, it opts for Farrelly brothers-style gross-outs -- vomit and chewed food and blocked drains -- which makes the movie itself seem like some kind of undigested expulsion rather than a well thought-out idea.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A bit of a docu-mess.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Certainly, this imagineered version of P.L. Travers’s life provides an orderly drama, but it’s uncomfortably reductive. It may be a small world, after all, but it comes in a lot more shades than Saving Mr. Banks suggests.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Much of Dodgeball feels competent but lazy. The nerds are barely distinguishable, except for one who thinks he's a pirate and says arghh a lot to no humorous effect.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A larger discomfort with Extract is an ambivalent attitude about comedy and social class. Mocking an officious middle-manager is always fair game; ridiculing blue-collar workers who resent their mindless jobs just feels mean.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For a movie aimed at children, Shark Boy and Lava Girl is gloomy.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Actress Kristen Stewart – coolly intense, androgynous, and intelligent – remains the series' strongest asset, as Bela, the emotional centre of the story.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Formula action films don’t come much more formulaic that this.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With its glum litany of naked corpses and mutilations, and understated actors looking bluish under the morgue's fluorescent lights, Nightwatch drains the fun out of horror. [17 Apr 1998]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Rousing? Sort of. Never before, one feels, have so few given so much for so much real estate.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    All of this unfolds with such predictability, the title might as well be The Great Foregone Conclusion.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Notable for its enthusiastic abandonment of any semblance of narrative coherence.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Eccentric and misguided enough to be almost perversely fascinating, the film doesn’t lack nerve; it’s just not very good.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Director Irwin Winkler (Night and the City)is rarely better than pedestrian in handling this story. At worst, the dramatic elements are plain clumsy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    To be very generous toward the filmmakers' intentions, Beowulf & Grendel might be seen as a misguided attempt to lend some modern nuance to a traditional tale of good and emphatic evil. But why pussyfoot? The movie is a lumbering and ludicrous mess.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is sentimental and reliant on bodily-function humour, but it also has a generous spirit, a multicultural rainbow of characters, and a social message about approaching fatherhood responsibly.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Breezy, sleazy and a little bit wheezy, The Big Bounce combines a short running time, a portrait of island-life corruption, and a retro surf-and-scam plot. Throw in a vintage, funky-soul soundtrack and you have the ingredients of ever so many bad television shows.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though the script takes pains to paint George as a passive boy-man, there's just not enough lovable here and too much of the thoughtless lout. Butler beware: In acting as in soccer, if you keep taking dives, sooner or later you pay the penalty.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    An Eddie Murphy comedy that's actually endearing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    While a lot of geography is covered, as a concert film, Conan O'Brien Can't Stop is decidedly thin entertainment.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A comedy about a middle-aged dad who has an affair with his neighbour's daughter, The Oranges does not taste freshly squeezed.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A bland, workaday detective flick that should have been much better than it is.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It’s less startling than it was when the first Sin City was released in 2005, maybe even quaint, like a black-light Jimi Hendrix poster from the ’60s.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Throughout, Terence Blanchard's score swells and sweeps, reminding us, at every moment, what we're supposed to feel. If only we knew what we were supposed to think of this trite mess.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    One of those comedies that is more peculiar than actually funny.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It doesn't take a foolish romantic to hope that Myles and Elisabeth live happily ever after. The world just isn't ready for 20 More Dates.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As a message movie, it's preachy without being serious; for an action movie, there's a lot of racket but not much fun.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though there are a few annoying moments when the actors get in the way of the scenery, mostly it succeeds.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The cast is so oddly interesting you wish you could see them doing something less wasteful
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    One disappointment here is that Patricia Clarkson, the queen of indie film, is missing much of her usual spark. Her performance may be aiming for sensual, but too often it comes across more as listless.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Every stage of the race and chase is announced on a webcast conducted by the secret impresario of the illegal De Leon race, a billionaire car enthusiast known as the Monarch, who “nobody knows.” Actually, the Monarch is clearly visible in a corner of the computer screen and he’s played, with jive-spouting brio by Michael Keaton. Hey, the movie isn’t called Need for Logic.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    So why does Savages feel so calculated, cutesy, free of suspense and trashy only in the uninteresting sense? No doubt, Stone is trying... but it all feels more like flexing atrophied muscles rather than creating a believable experience.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The less you know about Shakespeare, the more you're likely to enjoy Anonymous.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Redford hasn't moved too far here from an earlier political-thriller template: With its skulduggery, late-night meetings and the contemptuous political cabal out to thwart justice, The Conspirator can be thought of as "All the President's Men – The Lincoln Edition."
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Each of the actors has strong moments but the relentless intensity becomes monotonous.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    In a few sound bites, we get the picture and the picture's motto: the smug and selfish coast is an order of disaster-flick toast waiting to burn.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Both Smith and his son are appealing presences, but The Pursuit of Happyness seems to take place in a sociological vacuum. Gardner's insight into his difficulties begins and ends with the thought that, in the pursuit of happiness, there's a lot more pursuit involved than happiness, and unasked political questions seem to dangle ominously over the entire movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    You Kill Me is not so much a bad film as one filled with missed potential and marked by the seams of compromise.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    None of it rings true, except perhaps the presence of an ambitious local TV news reporter (Kyra Sedgwick) who begins recording every macabre moment with relish.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The first 45 minutes of this film feel like far too much normal and not nearly enough para.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is a freakish creature, with lush, painterly animation inspired by Dutch and Flemish masters, attached to a convoluted, gloomy narrative punctuated with scenes of sadism that rival "The Dark Knight."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Less an adaptation of its source material than a therapeutic response to it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Sugary but well-acted little emotional button-presser.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The trouble is that Antichrist feels progressively symptomatic of a director losing heart.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie begins to feel more like a buffet of contrivance than a feast of love.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Sincere performances and the beautiful gold-and-grey Donegal landscape can only go so far in A Shine of Rainbows, a family film that risks drowning in its own syrup.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For all the talent involved, The Eye of the Storm is an incident-stuffed but lacklustre affair – a case of lots of sturm, but not enough drang – that reaches for a satiric sting and emotional depth it never achieves.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There’s a fine line sometimes, as "This is Spinal Tap" reminded us, between stupid and clever. Now You See Me wobbles along that tightrope for much of its running time.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Brainless, but enjoyably over-the-top, the retro gang melodrama, Deuces Wild represents fifties teen-gang machismo in a way that borders on rough-trade homo-eroticism.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Bean falls well short of a work of genius. Indeed, the unbearable slightness of Bean feels like nothing so much as a betrayal of the television series on which it is based.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A sporadically amusing, occasionally off-putting French farce.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    All of this is accomplished with buckets of blood, but almost no sense of flesh: It's hard to recall a more sexless vampire flick.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Playing characters familiar to the fans, we have William Hurt as a blustering general, Tim Blake Nelson as a kooky scientist and Tim Roth as an evil soldier who morphs into a monster. All of them seem to be directing themselves.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie becomes an American salute to military patriotism, anybody's military patriotism. Think of it as "A Few Good Reds."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As anodyne as it is, Timothy Green may represent the last gasp of a genre, the live-action family fable, that has been an entertainment staple for a couple of generations of moviegoers.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Not only is The Village not credible, its shallowness makes it dislikable, a shopworn gothic plot focusing on stereotypical characters with disabilities, with no ambitions beyond playing a simple-minded audience head game.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The updated Dickensian sensibility of writer Craig Bartlett's story is appealing.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This bare-bones adaptation is more of a sop to the musical’s fans than a fully imagined movie musical.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The whole thing has all the spontaneity of high-school morning announcements.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Audiences can watch any number of similarly talented comics on late-night television or, even better, get close to the action at a downtown comedy club.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the conclusion, the movie turns into the ursine answer to "Free Willy," veering dangerously close to New Age parody: Free your inner bear -- and begin to heal from the last time you got mauled.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Iron Lady is a performance in search of a film.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Once again Anna Faris manages to be the best thing in another not very good Anna Faris movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Full of post-hippie fatalism and cynical macho barroom existentialism, the original film feels very much of its era, and the remake anachronistic.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The result is an erratically funny but often frustrating comedy, with an interesting premise hobbled by internal inconsistencies and uneven writing.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Alig's superficiality seems to have been his only talent. His banality is a problem that the film can't overcome.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For most of its duration, Suicide Kings turns into something like a hoary murder-mystery theatre piece in the Agatha Christie/Clue tradition.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Relentlessly twee as all this is, Wasikowska's warmth and Hopper's off-beat timing (he's the son of the late Dennis Hopper) are appealing to watch.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Vardalos has a talent, and there is one sequence in the movie that works. In the romantic subplot, Connie falls for Peaches' brother Jeff (David Duchovny, as Vardalos's sleepy, hunk replacement for John Corbett in Greek Wedding).
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Waters's rude, lewd and occasionally nude extended skit takes a simple idea and beats it limp.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Continuing directly from where 2010’s "Insidious" left off, Insidious: Chapter 2 follows the further misfortunes of the Lambert family with diminishing insidious rewards.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The old carnival phrase "Close, but no cigar" comes to mind when watching The Brothers Bloom , a globetrotting heist film that starts off terrifically and then progressively deflates.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Perhaps the most regrettable crime here is the way that Mann, trying to do too much, robs himself of a great opportunity. Here was a chance to capture the drama of the Thirties.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For its last third, the entire thing gets a Frankensteinian head transplant, and turns into derivative serial-killer nonsense.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The differences between the two movies are, first, that Scoop is a comedy and, second, unlike "Match Point," it's not very good, as Allen also returns to pre-Match Point mediocre form.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The result is a movie that's both odd and mediocre: not as bad as doing hard time, but not a particularly good time, either.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With its jazzy saxophone noodlings during the opening credits and its bruised black-and-blue look, it's so quaintly and conventionally pulp that you feel like filing a report with the cliché police.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Even if it's accepted simply as glitter-sprayed trash, sophomorically plotted and incompetently acted, Femme Fatale is a uniquely De Palma kind of effluence, an exercise in auteur self-parody.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The trouble is, once you get past the historical information and chummy interviews, you have to put up with the inevitable risk of any ad-hoc jam session: It Might Get Boring.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Spy Kids 3-D: Game Over, is still offbeat, but more in the sense of unco-ordinated than syncopated.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    On the downside, Rosebraugh’s own film is too self-righteous and his attempts to play a humour-challenged, lightweight version of Michael Moore in front of the camera is a misfire. The climate-change deniers are comforting, though obviously wrong. Greedy Lying Bastards is grating, even if it’s right.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Feels stale, bloated and willing to get by on sheer familiarity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    All this holding back is a bad idea, especially as the subject of an entire movie.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As a drama, The Soloist is stuck before it starts.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The dread in the film is so quickly forgotten. What remains is an urge to fly to Italy, rent an apartment in a medieval city and invent your own adventure.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This might be tolerable if Nair hadn't missed the central point, that Becky Sharp isn't sharp like spice, she's sharp like a razor.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A mixed bag of old-school and contemporary horror tricks that occasionally raises a hair prickle of intrigue.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A lot more cutting would have made this movie much funnier – but it should have taken place in the editing room, not on the screen.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A good-looking but anecdotally slight dramedy about life and lifestyles in Los Angeles's hip Silver Lake district.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Quaid and Whitaker, who serve more or less as the designated humans in this clockwork contraption of a film, are capable in corny roles, but otherwise Vantage Point is as stuffed with cardboard performances and expositional speeches as any seventies disaster flick.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The narrative of Lonesome Jim pokes about aimlessly, trying to mine nuggets of amusement.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Awkward in ways both intended and not, the fourth feature from author and director Rebecca Miller is an attempt at a comic change of pace for the usually earnest Miller.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The pervasive gore overpowers the few clumsy attempts at wit here, though the film does have one funny line. As one of Poe's literary rivals watches a razor-edged pendulum slice into his abdomen, the man screams in protest: "But I'm only a critic!"
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Thanks for Sharing might best be described as being like Steve McQueen’s sex-addiction drama, "Shame," if it were rewritten by Neil Simon at his most schmaltzy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The shipwreck comes too late to rescue movie from endless banalities. [02 Feb 1996]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There's plenty here to keep summer comedy fans satiated, if not entirely satisfied.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It might better be titled The Awkward.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though it is shaped as a woman-in-peril thriller about obsession, Cherish is about being winningly kooky, not violently insane.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Fascinating, even when it's fascinatingly bad.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Shot in country fields and interiors of fading Georgian glory, Easy Virtue has enough traces of Coward's wit to keep you hoping for the first hour or so, but then the film collapses under the weight of too many misguided innovations.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Feels like a period film in clumsy modern-day dressup.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With seemingly twice as much action, a whole new complex of villainy, competing Iron Man suits, robots and love interests, Iron Man 2 sequel cashes in hard on the unexpected success of the first Iron Man from 2007 and somehow loses much of its soul in the process.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Rarely have I seen a movie which made me feel more skeptically Canadian. Please -- it's not true that you can do anything. Stop trying. You might make things worse.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The script's attempt to splice together a fumbling love story with a portrait of toxic personality disorder feels incongruous, like a serving of porridge flambé au whisky.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the final act, involving possibly the most far-fetched scheme since Dr. Evil aimed his death ray at Earth in "Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me," the indifference has become completely contagious.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Big Fat Liar becomes a progression of increasingly elaborate slapstick stunts, in the brutal, noisy "Home Alone" vein, in which the complexity of the pranks rarely yields a commensurate comic reward.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the time we reach the climactic ending, the script clearly calls for an exorcist with a chainsaw to trim back this metaphor run amok.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Sporadically funny, twisted for sure, it risks becoming as repetitive and shrill as the kinds of programs it satirizes.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Otherwise, Brody, Scott and Jenifer Lewis (as Montana’s imperious oft-married mom) give this formulaic material maximum comic spin.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It might be called "It's Kind of a Thin Movie."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A potentially appealing story about a rescued disabled dolphin gets smothered with inspirational family values guff.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A discordant mix of melodrama and chaotic farce.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Bedtime Stories does divide into two types of comedy: There's the story comedy, in which Skeeter dresses in costume when he performs slapstick and insults people, and then there are the real-life scenes, when he does the same things in regular clothes.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A shrill and silly affair, bordering at times on camp.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is no religious fringe event. It’s from a major studio (Sony), with an Oscar-nominated star (Greg Kinnear), adapted for the screen by "Braveheart" screenwriter Randall Wallace.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Although the film and the actors keep on looking good, this solemn, soppy, fantasy has nothing to say about science or faith.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Mangold's larger problem is trying to hold together a movie that jerks about in tone as much as it does location, veering between grisly humour and cutesy sentiments.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Marks the emergence of a talented young actress. Not Britney -- who has the amateur's tendency to stand looking awkward after delivering her lines -- but Manning (Crazy/Beautiful), who plays Mimi with the gusto of a young Holly Hunter. Though she has little competition here, when she's on the screen she pretty much owns it.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Whether you fully embrace the Harry Potter phenomenon or simply live with it, there's no question that J. K. Rowling is an imaginative story-spinner. The trouble is that she has ruined the field for the legions of the second-rate.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The film only really has a pulse when it switches to live action in a few brief archival snippets, most memorably in John Cleese's appropriately outrageous eulogy for his late friend, an offering in the name of "anything for him, but mindless good taste."
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The result is that, rather than tragedy, this unfolds like a plodding morality tale in which Wrath and Cowardice play out their respective parts.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A Master Builder really doesn’t work, hampered by odd casting, theatrical performances and a reductive interpretation of Ibsen’s play.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Big, lavish and dumb as camel spit -- is proof that sometimes it's better to let sleeping genres lie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    RED
    The star turns are Red's raison d'être, with the winking performances filling the place of any credible dramatic tension.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This parade of admiration is almost as exhausting as the experience of a Motörhead concert.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Running Scared's relationship to "The Cooler" is roughly that of industrial metal to a quaint torch song.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Mostly feels as hackneyed as the first film felt fresh. It's a loud, puffed-up exercise in computer-generated heroics and battles that follows a pattern.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    After the first hour or so of strained puns and wisecracks, you start feeling that the sooner the ending comes, the happier it will be.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The result is an offence-free, mild entertainment in which everyone from cast to scriptwriter seems to be winging it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Hereafter is unpredictable enough to be consistently watchable.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It tries too hard too early.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A paint-by-numbers vigilante movie with the usual rogue cop, murdered wife and trail of vengeance.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Seems overstuffed and, in its own way, preachy.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Love Ranch bounces between tongue-in-cheek wackiness and soapy melodrama while rarely hitting a true note.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As for De Niro, he seems to have licence to do what he wants here, without much help from the writers.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Plays out like a 1950s B-movie with a fat special-effects budget. Brain-numbing dialogue, incoherent action and glaring improbabilities aside, it's a bearable combination of sci-fi paranoia and historical fantasy that drags modern viewers, and the robotic hero of "The Fast and the Furious" movies, Paul Walker, back to the centre of the Hundred Years War.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Exuberantly campy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Though competent in its B-movie way, Terminator Salvation lacks the humour, heart-tugging moments and visual pleasure that made the first two movies of the series modern pop masterpieces.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The script’s occasional gestures toward making this an allegory of the failed American dream are extremely unconvincing in the context of a movie that revels in the excesses of macho culture while laughing at the hapless and stupid who can’t get it right.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Finally, an Adam Sandler comedy that you can sit through without wanting to throw a mallet through the screen.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Like its characters, That Awkward Moment has commitment issues: It lacks the courage of its bad taste.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    An efficiently engineered piece of studio product, enjoyable enough at times, but with an unmistakable assembly-line quality.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The French director’s follow-up to his Oscar-winning silent movie comedy, "The Artist," is everything "The Artist" was not: long, unoriginal and heavy-handed.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Feels a little like the new "Pirates of the Caribbean" -- a similar wet fizzle of a sequel for sequel's sake -- but what do we know?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Lush, loud and sparkling, and not nearly as innocent as you might imagine.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    I can’t pardon Labor Day’s mush, not just because it’s mush, but because it comes with an unappetizing side order of condescension and contempt.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Unassuming only in its title.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The script, despite doses of irreverent humour, feels manipulative, and the music is oblivious to nuance, with a spectacular misuse of Johnny Cash singing "Hurt."
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Without a thin tether to credibility, this fussy, morbid fantasy simply slides off into the void.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Director David Dobkin, best known for comedies such as "Shanghai Nights" and "Wedding Crashers," demonstrates his serious intent mostly by paint-by-numbers psychology and a ponderous pace.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Kingdom is a barely coherent compendium of Middle East fantasies, fears and doubts.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The music, at least, is welcome.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A big bloated bore-o. Think of a combination of "Wild Wild West" and "Spy Kids."
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    As far as story is concerned, the whole thing feels like a rerun of a raucous Saturday-morning television show aimed at hell-raising five-year-olds.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This mix of titillation and sentimentality can pass as family entertainment because 17 Again is so weightless, a succession of one-liners, sincere monologues and logical absurdities.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Like "Little Miss Sunshine," the movie stars Toni Collette and Steve Carell in a story about a dysfunctional family trip, though like "Adventureland," it’s really about a teenager finding acceptance at a local theme park.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What big ambitions you have, Grandma. And what a disappointingly modest follow-through.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Loss of Sexual Innocence is not bad, as in the sense of inept; it's artful enough to show how truly trite it is.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The art of the classic Hitchcockian thriller is about style, pace and misdirection – and though Unknown is occasionally baffling and involves running and car chases, the film rarely manages to thrill.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Pimenthal's script consists of the scantiest storyline, framed around a succession of strained Farrelly Brothers-style gags that feel as though they were peeled off the floor of the editing room for "There's Something About Mary."
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Between a string of post-Friends dismal rom-coms, Aniston has succeeded in these kinds of grownup roles every few years. Here, she negotiates the character’s quirks and contradictions competently, but nothing short of a rewrite from scratch could make Cake palatable.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Aside from Jones’s broadly entertaining performance as the egotistical Supreme Commander, the movie, directed by Peter Webber (The Girl with the Pearl Earring), is a dud.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Without either the effect of a full concert spectacle, or up close and personal backstage intimacy, This Is It is neither one thing nor the other.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The problem lies with Williamson's script, which feels as if it has been torn from different places and glued back together like a ransom note.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Pandora’s Promise is less an exploration of the subject than a well-constructed sales pitch.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The word "arachnid," as it's said so contemptuously in the movie, begins to sound suspiciously like "Iraqi," and indeed, we soon see the elite bugs are hunkered down in their desert fortress, resisting the mighty air assaults of the Federation. The conclusion of our story involves unearthing the chief bug.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It's not so much a movie as a joint promotion for the National Basketball Association and teenaged rap and adolescent poster-boy Lil' Bow Wow.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Rather than invoke sympathy, the technique creates annoyance with Harris's writing: Sure, these characters may be clichés, but haven't they suffered enough?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Yes, Final Destination 3 is a roller-coaster ride of a movie from start to -- well, only about 10 minutes later. The fun part is over and we settle down to watch a sadistic assembly line of characters making premature exits.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    If you're going to a no-frills action film, though, at least you want the action to be entertaining, which is where Transporter 3 falls down.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There's an easy familiarity and charm in the creased, middle-aged faces of Nimoy, Shatner and DeForest Kelly (the perpetually irascible Dr. McCoy), all of whom now play their parts with an ever-present twinkle. Their behavior rarely has anything to do with the motives provided by the plot; rather, they wear their characters like old habits, as they boldly go where they've always gone before. [26 Nov. 1986, p.C5]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    A movie about a robot policeman given a childlike conscience, Chappie is one of those incongruous Franken-films that’s simultaneously bombastically brutal and treacly. Like E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial crossed with Transformers, or RoboCop starring Jar Jar Binks, it’s a recipe guaranteed to produce aesthetic indigestion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Richard Curtis, the writer of "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Notting Hill" and "Love, Actually," goes off-shore and out of his depth with Pirate Radio .
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    By the film’s end, one can’t help thinking that the story would be better served by a well-researched documentary on the real-life MFAA division (monuments, fine arts and archives.)
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The new heist movie Takers is surprisingly okay.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Distinctly middling, London-set romance.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    When Queen of the Damned knows it's ridiculous, it's moderately entertaining fun; when it tries to be serious, it's truly ridiculous.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Invisible isn't the formulaic horror film that the studio is selling it as but surely it wasn't supposed to be an accidental comedy either.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Unfortunately, this reverent and old-fashioned biopic is a prime example of the kind of inspirational movie that is, itself, uninspired.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The terror sequences (not only animals but monsoons and earthquakes and quicksand) are scary until they get monotonous: after a while, you have a sense you're watching a clip reel from every Hollywood disaster flick ever made.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The Rock is just typical big American dumb fun.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is the stage experience documented on film, from the perspective of someone sitting front row centre watching actors pitching for the back rows of the balcony.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    From time to time, as Alexandre Desplat's insistent score surged yet again while the characters rushed by, I found myself wanting the movie to slow down. Some of these images are too beautiful to disappear so quickly.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Isn't really a dull film so much as an oddly quaint one that seems to find a comfortable perspective about drastic circumstances.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The characters don't stay still long enough for the audience to worry about them. The high-priced actors (Freeman is especially wasted) are so much flotsam in the big water-tank action scenes.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The principle suspense is wondering when the suspense is going to start, as you scan the darkly-lit screen looking for any hint of imminent horror.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    It's the same package with new wrapping.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Directed by Brian Percival, best known for his work on "Downton Abbey," the film has the similar quality of a well-appointed historical soap opera.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Begins audaciously but goes to extremes to assert conventional wisdom about grownup life, that what is called "normal" is about just holding on.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The movie is a competent formula kid flick stuffed to the dimples with movie deja vu, a sop to those Hollywood-bashing politicians who want old-fashioned family values on their celluloid. [17 Nov 1995]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The narrative, cobbled together from various Pooh stories by an army of writers, is held together reasonably well by John Cleese's soothing narration.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    There are scenes that may make your stomach feel uncomfortable for a moment but rarely stories that will upset your equilibrium.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    This is one of those ludicrous, semi-offensive, semi-entertaining potboilers that feels as if the script were dragged out from someone's naughty-book stash.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Prime seems aimed at prime-time television, with endless iterations on the same theme of "frustrated relationship" that will finally get resolved during sweeps week in the season before cancellation. Call it: My Mama, the Shrink.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    World-weariness is not really the energetic star's best driving gear. Nor are declarations of menace intended to identify Jack Reacher as a modern-day mythic avenger. When he tells an enemy, through his clenched choppers, "I mean to beat you to death and drink your blood from a boot," the effect is, unintentionally, popcorn-spitting funny. Talk about overreaching.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Fitfully interesting, occasionally cringe-worthy, this is the sort of stagy production that mixes ribaldry and campy overacting that evokes summer theatre productions.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The film, shot in black-and-white at canted angles, suggests an R-rated Twilight Zone episode with a twist of Fellini-lite, in a trite film school kind of way. Mickey Mouse is unlikely to be shaking in his big yellow shoes.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The sickly feeling that Body of Lies leaves at its conclusion isn't just about the brutality of its subject; it's the realization that real-life barbarism translates so easily into adrenaline kicks for the multiplex.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Throughout, Wilson and Byrne play these parts straightforward and there's an undercurrent of real anguish in the struggle of parents coping with a child's long-term care.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    For a screwball comedy, it takes a long time to wind up, and Kline's Frenchman is an outright cartoon. But Ryan manages to hold attention. [6 Oct 1995, p.C2]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Whatever glimmers of cleverness Martian Child offers, it all comes to Earth with a thud in the shamelessly manipulative climax.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    The stunt work is top-notch; the dialogue and drama often food-spittingly funny. I can hardly wait for Extreme Ops II, perhaps set atop a South Sea island volcano, with North Korean agents and parasailing.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Sad news for Bard watchers: Julie Taymor's adaptation of William Shakespeare's The Tempest is not such stuff as dreams are made on.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    Remember Pam? Lost in the Himalayas of big egos and overacting, she's the invisible character here. If they create a special Oscar for the most thankless part in an ensemble comedy, Teri Polo is a shoe-in.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    With his heavy features and grimacing shyness, Dante provides the best entertainment in Swimfan.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Liam Lacey
    What is puzzling is how Edward Zwick has taken an extraordinary real-life story about a handful of people who defied huge odds, and turned it into an utterly conventional war movie.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    A lazy, hasty effort that offers little beyond a few jack-in-the-box startles and a high body count, including Hewitt's bouncing about in a shirt half-unbuttoned over a bikini top.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Though Lillard's excitable tone keeps promising wild comic adventures, the sequences are uniformly flat and humour-free.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Distinctly humdrum, The Last Legion, a boy's adventure story that seems to have been dragged out of the vaults of some early-sixties TV series.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    A determined romantic comedy with a theme, and damned if it won't see it through.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Director Adam Shankman pushes together scenes with little rhythm or flow. Writers Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant ignore credibility, throw in pointless sight gags, treat humiliation as comedy and use tiresome ethnic stereotypes. In short, Diesel doesn't get the help he needs.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    [Lange] does give the movie the only excitement it possesses -- the frisson of a hideous thrill -- but it's still an excruciating embarrassment.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Well-intended but maladroit, with a clever premise and cute animation that are undermined by the trite sci-fi parody plot and manic, unfunny banter.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The high point might be the opening scene, before the stars arrive on screen.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The intriguing thing about The Peaceful Warrior is that nothing else in the movie feels haphazard.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Brick Mansions is a non-starter: It chokes on its déjà vu, the hyperactive Mixmaster editing is exhausting and the characters’ banter is so leaden it might violate federal emission standards.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The most disturbing aspect of Cold Creek Manor -- a predictable, disjointed "Cape Fear" knockoff -- is that a script this disjointed and unoriginal could actually get the Hollywood green light.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Refn’s expectation-defying choice is laudable in theory, but Only God Forgives is a pretty awful drama.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The movie's dated, stereotypical comedy often contradicts its wholesome intentions, coming across as laboriously cutesy and occasionally perverse.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The lower orders seem to have been left out of The Lost City -- there just aren't any poor characters -- which for a movie about a workers' revolution seems downright slipshod.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    All the borderline pantomime acting and wigged buffoonery is deliberate and silly, but The Three Musketeers remains charmless, a romp brought down by its lead-footed script.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    A twisted, but not particularly clever, black comedy.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    With its stilted dialogue, fragments of voice-over and over-busy camera, Red Riding Hood feels off-kilter from the start.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Some of the most memorable performances from great actors are also their worst: Add to that list Anthony Hopkins's turn as a sinister old Jesuit.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    After six years in development, this comedy starring and produced by Adam Sandler feels as slapped together one of the comedian's live-action buddy movies.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The United States of Leland has a resonance of "Elephant" without the visual poetry or structural sophistication, or "American Beauty" without the leavening comedy, but it's neither an insightful nor well-made film.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    By comparison to this effort, "Pineapple Express" seems like a model of thoughtful maturity.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Runner Runner is a bad run of cliché clichés.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The movie seems much, much longer than its 90-minute running time. [15 June 1998]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 26 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    For about 20 minutes, Phantoms, based on Dean Koontz's bestseller, keeps you guessing. After that, it barely keeps you awake.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    It's difficult to say who is more misguided here: the men (director, screenwriter and producer) who made the movie, or the women who signed on to play the parts.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    A plot so preposterous it could only have emerged from the underground comic world.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Stallone's sequel has almost nothing to do with the original film except that it's about dancing; otherwise, it's Rocky IV with legwarmers. [16 Jul 1983]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    They are singing the jingle in the bath, in bed, in the car, ready to send you, like George, smack into a tree.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The devil is back in Exorcist: The Beginning, and he is more disgusting than ever. Not more scary, just really yucky, in a kind of maggots-on-a-pizza-slice way.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    None of this is funny enough to justify stealing 90 minutes of your viewing time.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    While the pale skin tones (bronzer is selectively applied) and haphazard mix of American and British accents is distracting, it barely scratches the surface of Exodus’s ungainly artificiality.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The problem is that director Wayne Wang seems deaf to the tonal differences between coming-of-age, magic realism and children's comedy.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    This briefly inspired bit of surreality quickly descends into gratuitous bondage, mayhem and dumb humour, marking the usual progression from mildly absurd premise to gratingly idiotic conclusion.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Dull Blade just doesn't cut it.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Both syrupy and scatological, this is a typical family-dividing Sandler comedy: Parents will hate it but the kids will delight in its rudeness.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Norbit is pretty much a bad-taste sinkhole.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Very little of it works.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Before immediately handing the movie an F and sending it off to summer school, give the filmmakers, and especially co-star Jason Schwartzman, credit for their anarchic willingness to try anything to shock a laugh loose from an audience.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Both cautionary and comforting (yes, some kids today prefer conversation to cybersexting), Men, Women & Children is as anxious to seem contemporary as any after-school special.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    After a while, it begins to feel like a confused comedy: How to explain to the neighbours that your dead husband has moved back home?
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The problems with First Sunday extend well beyond the hokey premise and predictable performances to the fundamentals of script, direction and tone.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Reign of Fire never comes close to recovering from its demented premise, but it does sustain an enjoyable level of ridiculousness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The result is as off-putting as biting into a confection in which the sugar has been replaced by salt.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    If you thought "300" was silly, think of 10,000 BC as 33.333 times sillier.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The results are so listless, dated and characterless.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    It's the sort of visual joke you would wince at in a 1940s movie; to see it nowadays, you're tempted to dismiss it as unintentional.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Just my luck that I saw the trailer for the film several times and already knew all of this, which made the long-form version of the movie redundant.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    A vigorously cross-marketed product, with comics, collectable cards, games and a television series.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The plot's not so hot -- it feels like it was jotted down by someone on an after-dinner napkin.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Serving Sara, which often feels more like serving time, is one of those tortured Hollywood romantic comedies that starts with a passable premise and turns into an inventory of flat gags and weak lines set against a travelogue backdrop.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    You leave Stolen Summer with the feeling that you have watched acrobats stumble on a tightrope with no net below. Not a great show, but at least nobody got badly hurt.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Call it Nancy Drew and the Case of the Confused Adaptation.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Talky, crude and sexist, Mallrats is significantly less funny, a flatulent sequel to the director's small start.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    A semi-intriguing abomination, the movie The Cat in the Hat takes a piece of classic childhood Americana and turns it into something garish, dumb, ugly and senseless.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Feels like a five-year-old with a megaphone, excitedly yelling about his latest bulldozer-soldier-dinosaur smash-kill-squash-everything game.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Is Kazaam racist? In effect, yes. But it'sracism linked to bad marketing: You can't really mix a black-pride rap film with a revamped version of "Free Willie" and expect them to magically jibe.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Riding that fine line between misjudged and deliberately anti-p.c., Get Hard is lewd, crude and rude but, despite its disastrous reception at SxSW, not entirely unfunny.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    An Adam Sandler movie without Adam Sandler, it turns out, is not necessarily an improvement.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The script is definitely mediocrity mixed with complication.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    This time the action takes us out of the usual campgrounds and girls in underwear into the realm of outer space, where no one can hear you screaming "Enough already."
    • 31 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    The filmmakers have altered the premise from the unlikely to the ridiculous.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Mostly, the plot is busy and incomprehensible and the action sequences directed with all the art of a detonation.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    There's no doubt the cast is driven and talented; some day, it might be interesting to watch a film about what such kids are really like.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    General Boredom meets Major Tedium on the Civil War fields of Virginia.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Liam Lacey
    Through it all, actress Posey strikes attitudes and preens across the glib surface of the film, and though her campy excesses are tolerable for a brief time, the performance becomes an exercise in overkill. [13 Oct 1995]
    • The Globe and Mail (Toronto)
    • 50 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Some movies just bring out your inner Matlock: a desire to grab young punks by the lapels, smack them against a wall, knock their cigarettes to the ground and wipe the sneers off their faces. Such is the case with the callow and cynical The Rules of Attraction.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Isn't just ordinarily lame, it easily exceeds any normal requirements for witless sleaze.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Perhaps the best that can be said for Year One is that it aims low and hits the mark.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    This one is headed straight for star Tommy Lee Jones's career-blooper reel.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Sparks’s preposterous approach has crystalized into cliché.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Phantom still an auditory lobotomy.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    The paradox here is that the message of respect for animal life is outweighed by the lack of respect for human beings.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Somewhere in literary afterlife, dear reader, Jane Austen has just rolled over and reached for her musket.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 25 Liam Lacey
    Land of the Lost is one of those films so caught up in its concept it has forgotten its audience.

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