For 1,232 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Liam Lacey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Another Year
Lowest review score: 0 Batman & Robin
Score distribution:
1,232 movie reviews
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Surf's Up is that rarity in a children's movie, a comedy that's actually exciting.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    On the positive side, it's still four back-to-back Simpsons episodes, which is still better than most of what either television or the movies have to offer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    For audiences tired of summer sequels that grind through the familiar motions, Stardust provides a dizzying antidote.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Like the comic stars of the silent era, Mr. Bean's character transcends language barriers.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Sington's smartest decision was to let 10 of the astronauts speak for themselves. The film juxtaposes their personal stories, both their doubts and machismo, with the titanic achievement of the lunar landings.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Instead of the typical John Grisham-style connect-the-dots legal thriller, we get a film that's idiosyncratic, with a time-shifting structure, a surfeit of subplots and characters.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The winner of this year's audience award for best documentary at Sundance has it all: heartless media, art fraud and a four-year-old painting prodigy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    As an epic, American Gangster doesn't cut it. The reputations of Francis Ford Coppola's "The Godfather," Brian De Palma's "Scarface," Martin Scorsese's "Goodfellas" or Michael Mann's "Heat" are safe. At best, American Gangster is no better than a workmanlike imitation of its betters.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Even with new information provided in the film, however, his personality remains not so much elusive as cantankerous, particularly in contrast with the expansiveness of his songs. That gap gives I'm Not There something of a hollow centre.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    This is a human-sized drama about people with contradictory motives, trying to help or use each other.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    A demanding blend of spectacle, drama and exposition of ideas.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    A conventional mixture of thriller and moral drama, the film is unsettling in both intentional and unintentional ways.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    There are zombie movies and then there are George Romero films.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The strengths of Fugitive Pieces are its fluidity and subtlety. Emotional repression may be one of the most difficult conditions to portray honestly, and Dillane's performance of Jakob is a study in the art of creating sympathy by not asking for it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The film walks the fine line between exploitation and empathy to cast a chilly, memorable spell.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The phrase in the title "wanted and desired" is offered by a producer friend of Polanski's who describes him as "wanted" in the United States, but "desired" in Europe, where sexual behaviour is treated more honestly and artists' dark sides are celebrated.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Overnuanced, a world of delicate cruelty, where most of the wounds take place without breaking the skin or even a sweat.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    George W. Bush is hammered for doubling the debt load with his high-spending, low-taxing ways.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    An innovative romantic comedy that is a mixture of British spice and American sugar.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The movie's title proves to be not entirely a case of bait-and-switch. The film really is a homage to vintage Hollywood comedy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Unlike "Being John Malkovich," which JCVD sometimes resembles, there is no secret portal to the star's head; instead, the audience gets a fleeting glimpse through the smeared window of his soul.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Fortunately, there's always the fascination of watching actor Toni Servillo, who does a brilliant job of playing Andreotti (known as Beelzebub) as a kind of devil with a clown's exterior.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    An absorbing and not-too-uncomfortable experience, so long as you remember there's a camera lens and a big distance between you and the film's violent subject.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Though Three Monkeys feels conventional compared with Ceylan's other work, it maintains its auteurist imprint, especially the rich colour palette and suggestive HD camerawork that helped Ceylan take the best-director honours at Cannes this year.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Though there are moments when the drama turns into intellectual debate, the film is also emotional, moving with a fluid, mounting tension and moments of anguish and strange, startling humour.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    The End of the Line's most topical hook is its exploration of bluefin tuna, which, as a sushi delicacy, is sometimes called the "most expensive meat on the planet."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    Well-spoken but humorously self-deprecating, Berg admits that, between the hours spent writing, rehearsing and performing, she spends more of her life as Molly than she does as herself.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    For all its ballyhoo'd full access to Vogue's inner workings, the movie's cinéma-vérité approach feels perilously close to advertorial.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    A kind of stealth political film that confronts issues of ethnic tension and American xenophobia.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Liam Lacey
    What makes Crude worthy of the overused term “epic” is the way the case symbolizes a host of contemporary issues: the iron-fistedness of multinational corporations; environmental despoliation; the disappearance of indigenous cultures; and the power of celebrity and the media to influence justice.