Lisa Alspector
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For 529 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lisa Alspector's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Chuck & Buck
Lowest review score: 0 Bless the Child
Score distribution:
529 movie reviews
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Vigilant viewers may spend many of the 101 minutes fixating on tiny holes in the plot, but I was busy being moved by the premise and the filmmakers' confidence in the power of their metaphor: a little boy who's disappointed in the man he grew up to be.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The hinted romance, featuring Aaliyah, makes for some decent drama and some fine comedy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    A mildly psychological suspense thriller with military trappings.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Writer-director Mark Brown ruptures and restores the realism in this romantic comedy with ease, dispensing earnest wisdom with a little tongue in cheek instead of undermining it with a lot of irony.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Even though I appreciate this movie's craft, I wish I hadn't seen it. It's a heady, progressive -- or perhaps elaborately conservative? -- romance, but it's also a tale of terrible suffering.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    A standard mix of performances, interviews, and gimmickry -- the image and sound sometimes loop or jump in a tiresomely literal attempt to translate the techniques of scratching and "beat juggling" into cinema.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    A musical number or two might have balanced the overdetermined politics and spectacle in this version.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This bright noir, with gleaming cinematography by Jeffrey Jur, is as single-minded as a short story, but the premise is almost too clever.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This gently satirical farce is atmospheric when dabbling in religion--the chef turns to spiritual magic to defuse her passion for her husband--and moving during her heart-to-hearts with her friend.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    A pleasure.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Lots of men cry lots of tears in this supremely self-indulgent, supremely moving documentary about making a documentary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The material is powerful--one boxer has been accused of a crime and the trial conflicts with a crucial competition--but much of it feels predigested, the themes inadvertently one-dimensional.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This insidiously complex satire is filled with apparent digressions, and our complete identification with the man occurs so gradually that it's impossible to pinpoint just when our previous disdain becomes a position of relative comfort.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The deliberately obvious equating of knife throwing with sex would be funnier if it weren't so serious, and the undercut eroticism is part of what makes the movie themeless, merely a conceptual exercise.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    There are enough plot points to fill an entire soap-opera season, but writer-director Chi Muoi Lo, who also plays the son, somehow manages to juggle them all, turning seemingly superfluous elements into workable drama and metaphor.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Luc Besson--and Andrew Birkin wrote the pandering, adolescent screenplay for this pseudosubversive hagiography, and nearly every scene screams out its sensationalist intent, though few actually achieve the status of spectacle.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This early-1900s costume drama surely differs from Henry James's source novel.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Writer-director Aiyana Elliott gives her father his due in this evenhanded yet impassioned documentary.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Grisman presents, with a sense of humor, the apparent contradictions of a complex personality.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Includes extensive performance footage but never drags, and it isn't exposé or self-mockery.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Chillingly beautiful cinematography makes the state's landscapes appear timeless as it sets the stage for a grim history told with archival portraits.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The running joke about coffee enemas will date this innocuous, crowd-pleasing adventure comedy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Against the lush backdrop of the Andes, Crowe and Caruso define on-screen cool: good guys in a match of wits and firepower who even talk about their emotions.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    It's hard to tell whether these characters are meant to seem as staunchly symbolic as they do when they deliver some of the back-story-heavy dialogue.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This eerily dry drama bravely attempts to show, without resorting to the literal staging of contradictory scenarios, how much perceptions of the same situation can vary.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Whether the story's bald ironies are historical cliches or just dramatic ones, they convey only platitudes about gender, sexuality, and power.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Sandler is disarming and compelling as Sonny.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The movie, which leans too heavily on the metaphorical value of the two historic events, dives from heady romance into heavy moralizing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    There's little rapport between Duchovny and Driver after their initial meeting. More exciting and suspenseful is the relationship between Driver's confidant (Hunt) and her husband (James Belushi), who can't seem to get all their kids to go to sleep at the same time.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Though it suggests intriguing ideas about the nature of performance, humor, ambition, and the consumption of spectacle, the movie only superficially explores them.

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