Lisa Alspector
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For 529 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lisa Alspector's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Chuck & Buck
Lowest review score: 0 Bless the Child
Score distribution:
529 movie reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    Political incorrectness, gross-out humor, references for their own sake, and some real wit are distributed over the 85 minutes with an unusually consistent sense of timing and proportion, and the tone is just right.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    The lush, emotional scenes are enhanced by the sound track.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    Drew Barrymore's virtuoso performance smooths over the plot holes.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    For the sake of more irony--the movie is lousy with it--the precocious characters have an infantile response to the discovery that their parents are missing: all want their mommies after a night of junk-food excess.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    A wizard at manipulating time, Kitano introduces staccato elements that interrupt the meditative pace even as they help set it.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    Entrancingly lurid live-action fantasy.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    Scenes that should have been uproarious are weaker than many of the movie's smaller moments.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    This bleak vision directed by Darren Aronofsky ("Pi") is pointless with good reason.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    A hallucination sequence and a scene set in a Vegas nightclub are so engrossing you forget they're animated; even the showiest techniques don't detract from the story.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    But Peter Hyams, who's both director and director of photography, forces us to constantly strain to see what isn't there, until ultimately the screen explodes in welcome light, a cathartic finale in broad visceral terms even if the drama hasn't inspired much emotion.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    Even the melodramatic score can't ruin the essentially serious tenor of this old-style non-self-referential horror story, whose characterizations are unassailable--stereotypical shtick you buy because the performers are working so hard and their faces are so skillfully lit.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    The music's great, but frequent tight shots of actors ostensibly blowing their horns look phony enough to be distracting.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    Subplots are woven stealthily into the story, taking the pressure off the central drama, allowing it to be affecting rather than melodramatic, and heightening the atmosphere of the lush Louisiana setting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    Their blossoming love is thwarted at every opportunity by wicked stepmother Anjelica Huston, whose practical motive -- she wants her own daughter to become queen -- is part of an unusually nuanced characterization.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    Set in an expressively underlit environment, this rivetingly moody drama is enhanced by the restrained use of incidental music.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    It's all very clever but not really provocative - though a layer of political subtext may make the scenario seem funnier and more meaningful.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    A sparing use of exterior shots during the mesmerizing buildup to the match heightens their impact, while invasively tight close-ups put the actors to the test.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Lisa Alspector
    The wavering style and tone fragment the movie, undermining both characters' development, though each retains her power as a symbol.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This buddy movie grows on you.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Many of the gags rely on the incongruity of Grant's nervous, cultured character posing as an Italian-American stereotype, but they're subverted by his earnest relationship with his fiancee, whose affection hardly seems worth the trouble.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    A realist mode that strains credibility; it's tenuous and inflexible -- and easily ruptured by the contrived irony in Jimmy McGovern's screenplay.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The material is powerful--one boxer has been accused of a crime and the trial conflicts with a crucial competition--but much of it feels predigested, the themes inadvertently one-dimensional.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Lots of men cry lots of tears in this supremely self-indulgent, supremely moving documentary about making a documentary.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Writer-director Mark Brown ruptures and restores the realism in this romantic comedy with ease, dispensing earnest wisdom with a little tongue in cheek instead of undermining it with a lot of irony.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    A standard mix of performances, interviews, and gimmickry -- the image and sound sometimes loop or jump in a tiresomely literal attempt to translate the techniques of scratching and "beat juggling" into cinema.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Instructive comedy, which is marvelously neutral toward a type of sexual and domestic relationship that's often exploited or overblown.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    There are enough plot points to fill an entire soap-opera season, but writer-director Chi Muoi Lo, who also plays the son, somehow manages to juggle them all, turning seemingly superfluous elements into workable drama and metaphor.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Images about imagery can be diverting, even insightful, but this painterly 1999 feature piles up studies in elaborately choreographed motion that are their own reason for being.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    There's little rapport between Duchovny and Driver after their initial meeting. More exciting and suspenseful is the relationship between Driver's confidant (Hunt) and her husband (James Belushi), who can't seem to get all their kids to go to sleep at the same time.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Grisman presents, with a sense of humor, the apparent contradictions of a complex personality.

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