Lisa Alspector

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For 529 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lisa Alspector's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Chuck & Buck
Lowest review score: 0 Jawbreaker
Score distribution:
529 movie reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Its depiction of teenage behavior appears calculated to seem irreverent while satisfying expectations.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Even as you're wincing at what you thought was misguided earnestness, it's being subverted by filmmakers who've turned many of the genre's weaknesses into tiny triumphs.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Visually imaginative and even persuasively spiritual.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Sex and JFK's assassination are intertwined in this puerile, pseudodark story about a wacky family--an adaptation of Wendy MacLeod's play that uses the medium of cinema mainly to exploit archival footage.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Danny Glover and Mel Gibson make a gently contrasted (and nicely self-reflexive) odd couple in this action-comedy sequel.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Instructive comedy, which is marvelously neutral toward a type of sexual and domestic relationship that's often exploited or overblown.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The running joke about coffee enemas will date this innocuous, crowd-pleasing adventure comedy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    There's tenderness, humor, a gratuitous body double, and splashy lighting in this ho-hum action drama, which takes itself at times too seriously and at other times not seriously enough.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Much of the three-hour movie takes place in the prison, but the resonant characterization, expansive plotting, and judicious use of exterior locations and flashbacks remove any sense of claustrophobia or sluggishness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This bright noir, with gleaming cinematography by Jeffrey Jur, is as single-minded as a short story, but the premise is almost too clever.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    It's hard to tell whether these characters are meant to seem as staunchly symbolic as they do when they deliver some of the back-story-heavy dialogue.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    It's all very impressive without being particularly enthralling.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    As an undiscovered beauty who frequents open-stage night at the local performance-art club, her rack hidden under paint-spattered overalls, her chiseled face obscured by glasses, Rachael Leigh Cook is charming and sincere, and ultimately so is Prinze, whose character's realization that he's not as shallow as he'd thought is convincing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    There are moments of high hilarity in the slapstick that results when the characters attempt to minimize mucus-membrane contact during sex.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    A standard mix of performances, interviews, and gimmickry -- the image and sound sometimes loop or jump in a tiresomely literal attempt to translate the techniques of scratching and "beat juggling" into cinema.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Beautifully regenerates the Jay Ward TV show its characters were based on.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This gently satirical farce is atmospheric when dabbling in religion--the chef turns to spiritual magic to defuse her passion for her husband--and moving during her heart-to-hearts with her friend.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    The connection between his boasting about killing and killing so he can boast about it -- is made beautifully insidious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    An admirable if frequently soporific 1992 adaptation of Norman Maclean's account of life in Missoula, Montana.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    It's marvelous or unwatchable.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Isn't terribly frightening or gory, and at times it's even atmospheric. It also has a sense of humor, and the digs at the prequels hit pay dirt.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Though it suggests intriguing ideas about the nature of performance, humor, ambition, and the consumption of spectacle, the movie only superficially explores them.
    • 11 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    But the most stimulating, satisfying aspect of this action fantasy is the theme music.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    It's always at least a little disingenuous to attack the medium that's your bread and butter; this media-bashing movie tries to get around the problem by restricting its critique to television, specifically the news.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    A musical number or two might have balanced the overdetermined politics and spectacle in this version.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Chillingly beautiful cinematography makes the state's landscapes appear timeless as it sets the stage for a grim history told with archival portraits.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    Plotted densely enough to make the lulls forgivable, this movie concerns a contract killer (Bruce Willis) who employs several small-business owners to craft his super-high-tech weapons and the many accessories that enable him to assume multiple identities.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This special-effects animal-action comedy is for heavily identified pet owners.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    There are enough plot points to fill an entire soap-opera season, but writer-director Chi Muoi Lo, who also plays the son, somehow manages to juggle them all, turning seemingly superfluous elements into workable drama and metaphor.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Lisa Alspector
    This eerily dry drama bravely attempts to show, without resorting to the literal staging of contradictory scenarios, how much perceptions of the same situation can vary.

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