For 2,481 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lou Lumenick's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Da Vinci Code
Lowest review score: 0 Dungeons & Dragons
Score distribution:
2481 movie reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Looks great but moves like molasses, is more interesting than truly involving.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A schmaltzy filmed record of a Nashville concert given by the legendary former rocker, who has morphed into the new Kenny Rogers.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The sort of enigmatic movie that many critics embrace because it's open to endless interpretation.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The movie fails to add up to the sum of its laborious parts. There's no emotional investment in any of the characters, and you can see the writer-director's windup con coming a mile away.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Even a great British cast and obscenity-laden gangland dialogue aren't enough to make what amounts to an extended acting exercise into much of a movie.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Many of the kids seem to be social outcasts of one kind or another, but Spellbound, which will show on cable later this year, doesn't dig deep enough to disturb the movie's relentless feel-good tone.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A glossy, empty and ultimately unsatisfying — if undeniably entertaining — movie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Ultimately fails to make its case that five teenagers were sent to jail for a crime they didn't commit solely because of institutional racism.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A chilly, pretentious and talky drama.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Hard-core Hitchcock fans will not find much in the way of revelations.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Needs less talk, more music.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    After a promising start, writer-director Daniel M. Cohen pours on schmaltz straight out of the similarly themed "Diamonds," including the proverbial hookers -- with hearts of gold.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A ho-hum male weepie/road comedy that's worth watching mostly because of a once-in-a-lifetime gathering of England's greatest working-class actors.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Filmmakers Sam Green and Bill Siegel tend to shy from tough questions, allowing their subjects to wax nostalgic about bomb-throwing as yet another youthful folly of the '70s. That's tougher to swallow than some boomers' claims they didn't inhale.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Has its moments, but overall the effect is uneven.
    • New York Post
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Me and You takes a couple of neat swipes at the pretentiousness of the art scene, but as a commentary on the difficulty of connecting in contemporary society, it's too precious by half.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    It may take a scorecard to keep track of the complicated relationships in this sorry clan.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Moves in a predictable path that includes some remarkable coincidences.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Perhaps this year’s timeliest film — as well as, unfortunately, one of the hardest to sit through.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    At best, mildly entertaining.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Treads an awfully thin line between the provocative and the exploitative.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Raja, which is basically a dark comedy about how this odd couple manipulate each other, is extremely well acted, though the direction by Jacques Doillon is on the leisurely side.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A challenging experimental film that will never play in a commercial movie theater and is settling in for a two-week run at the ever-venturesome Film Forum.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A calculating crowd-pleaser aimed squarely at the under-25 crowd, who can feel free to add a star or two to my rating.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    You'll have to look elsewhere than this love letter to the Great White Way to explain why "Wicked" and "Avenue Q" became huge hits, and why "Caroline, or Change" joined "Taboo" as a costly flop.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The Lady and the Duke, which drags on for over two hours, is an experiment in shooting a period film on a shoestring that turns out to be more interesting than actually entertaining.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Schmaltzy and endless.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    What is Inland Empire - which Lynch is understandably distributing himself - about? What is it trying to say? If you figure that out, let me know.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    There are lots of special effects, but sadly, no real magic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    An earnest, if dreary little Canadian domestic drama.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Unfortunately for the film, it's clear from the outset this is a totally one-sided battle that well-connected developer Bruce Ratner is fated to win.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Rather morbid.
    • New York Post
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A soufflé that begins promisingly but never quite rises.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    In their overly earnest attempt to flesh Sendak’s story out to 100 minutes, Jonze and his co-screenwriter, novelist Dave Eggers, have laboriously spelled out motivations (divorce is bad!), elaborated back stories -- and added reams of less-than-inspired dialogue.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The Sketches of Frank Gehry will appear this fall on PBS' "American Masters," which seems a more appropriate venue than theaters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Suffers even more than the Harry Potter films from a compulsion to be faithful to the source material, including cramming in a head-spinning assortment of characters and subplots.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Disappointing, curiously uninvolving.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Deeply mediocre and ultra-predictable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Amusing without being particularly biting.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A determinedly raunchy holiday comedy about a libidinous, larcenous and perpetually soused St. Nick with a nonstop potty mouth.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    District B13 looks great, but don't let those subtitles fool you. At heart, it's every bit as proudly dumb as its American counterparts.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Science fiction movies don't come much more ponderous than the beautifully filmed Never Let Me Go, which reduces the debate over genetic engineering to a mild, moist romantic soap opera.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    This lavish coffee-table-book of a movie gradually reveals itself as an uninvolving, crashing bore.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Overall, The Last September is a real snooze.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Chicago 10 has interesting moments, but basically it's a teaser for Steven Spielberg's upcoming feature on the trial.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Wants to be a "Last Tango in Paris" for the new millennium, but its flaccid dramatization and hollow moralizing doesn't rise even to the level of last year's "An Affair of Love," let alone Bertolucci's masterpiece.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Gibson sure knows how to shoot a sequence, but he also doesn't know when to stop with the blood, gore and maiming.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Only sporadically entertaining.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A beautifully acted if fairly poky coming-of-age story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Watching The Italian Job in a theater makes you long for a fast-forward button - to skip past 90 eyeball-glazing minutes of generic caper plotting and cut to the chase, as it were.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Even in support of the noblest of causes, manipulation is manipulation.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    As formulaic in its own way as anything mainstream Hollywood turns out, In Bruges is also a fish-out-of-water comedy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Sporadically entertaining, occasionally quite funny.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Rogers gives a brave performance, but there isn't much chemistry between Bridges and Basinger, who were teamed to better effect in 1987's "Nadine."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Holds your attention for a while, but fails to build much suspense as it races toward a predictable climax. It probably would have worked better as a series of Webisodes, which reportedly was the original plan.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Excellent performances by a good cast and a fairly authentic look at working-class struggles go only so far.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    It's a drawn-out look at politics that's largely devoid of the trademark humor that long ago got New Wave veteran Chabrol labeled the Gallic Hitchcock.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Basically "Jumanji" in outer space -- and even without Robin Williams, this is still a singularly loud, charmless and overbearing family movie that could use a hit or two of Ritalin.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Good grief! This painfully sincere animated feature seems aimed less at contemporary kids than nostalgic adults who might buy toys marketed for what is being billed as the 50th anniversary of the Peanuts gang for their children and grandchildren.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    If Ruby were more of a person than a character, we might care more for her plight. But like Calvin, Kazan has written herself into a corner that can only lead to embracing the sappy romantic clichés that Ruby Sparks tries half-heartedly to mock.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A surprisingly upbeat look at that Middle East hotspot.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The poster art for Nanette Burstein's American Teen, which follows five students through their senior year at a high school in Indiana, is modeled after the one for "The Breakfast Club." So, to a large extent, is this ultra-slick and predictable documentary.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Rambling, mildly engaging micro-budgeted indie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Even with a clever final twist straight out of "The Twilight Zone," this crummy-looking two-hander is a tough sit.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Basically a watered-down collage of scenes from "Heathers," "Clueless," "Sixteen Candles" and numerous other teen flicks.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Sometimes dull and mostly uninspired, it's much less a satisfying reboot like "Batman Begins'' than a pointless rehash in the mode of "Superman Returns.''
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Aimed squarely at the under-6 crowd, is basically the pilot for a Nickelodeon series with an already heavily merchandised character.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The acting is OK, but none of the leads has the kind of sizzle that might have turned this into something as special as another film set roughly in the same era, "Diner.''
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Fairly shapeless story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Except for a couple of isolated, mildly subversive moments, Hanks is basically playing the genial host of “The Wonderful World of Disney’’ rather than an actual person.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A wonder to look at, even as its increasingly pretentious manga-inspired story line outstays its welcome.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Less an awful movie than a totally uninspired one. The under-5 set may find it funny, though I suspect their parents will be checking their watches a lot, as I did.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Rambles on for nearly two hours with subplots that go nowhere -- and half-baked leftist political commentary -- before focusing in for a quietly devastating climax.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Merely a passably amusing excuse to pass a couple of hours in an air-conditioned theater.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    At times, writer-director Cedric Klapsich seems to be trying to copy the frestyle of "Amelie," but L'Auberge achieves only a fraction of its charm.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Beautifully shot but a soulless cash machine, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 delivers no dramatic payoff, no resolution and not much fun. Hopefully we'll get that in the final installment next summer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The posthumous campaign to polish Michael Jackson's tarnished reputation continues apace with this Spike Lee infomercial, commissioned by Sony and the money-grubbing Jackson estate to promote the 25th anniversary of his 1987 album "Bad.''
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    What is Dick's excuse for outing one cable news anchor but not a rival counterpart who is far better known? The anchor isn't antigay, but Dick likes the other network's politics better. Hypocrisy? Your call.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    There isn't a surprising moment, and it's an affirmation for hard-core fans and pretty much everyone else of William Shatner's immortal exhortation to Trekkies: "Get a life!"
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Weds half-hearted thriller elements to the self-absorbed, no-budget mumblecore films pioneered by Katz in efforts like "Dance Party, USA."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Disappointingly skin-deep and almost shockingly wholesome, Mary Harron's The Notorious Bettie Page lives up to neither its title nor its advertising slogan, "the pin-up sensation that shocked the nation."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    If you were wondering what “12 Years a Slave” might have been like as a two-part episode of “Masterpiece Theatre,” you might want to check out this unsatisfying but not uninteresting oddity. It renders another historical story about race with exquisite taste but not much in the way of passion.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Works its way to an improbably cheerful ending, but getting there is a slow trip.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    It's basically a Middle Eastern version of "The Princess Bride" with an assisted-suicide subplot.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Though it comes from a director whose résumé includes "Flashdance" and "9 ½ weeks," these smoke-filled interludes are less erotic than today's average car commercial.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Return comes briefly to life when John Slattery of "Mad Men'' turns up as an acerbic yet sympathetic reclusive drunk whom Kelli meets during court-mandated rehab. But it's not enough for a film that limps along to a pretty much preordained climax.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Godardian title not withstanding, Zeina Durra's not-uninteresting slice of the downtown Manhattan demimonde is too concerned with being cool to work up much in the way of political outrage, much less narrative drive.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Quirky and sometimes hilarious Canadian comedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Not even a compelling performance by Al Pacino as Shylock can make The Merchant of Venice work in its first major big-screen adaptation.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Sarah Silverman: Jesus is Magic works best when this equal-opportunity offender is on the stage.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Slight and unremarkable.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Out of the Furnace is much longer on style and belligerence than actual substance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The 3-D effects are among the most effective ever shot.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Despite some remarkable unembedded footage, Andrew Berends' is yet another disappointingly superficial, unfocused and one-sided documentary on the conflict in Iraq.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    There's not a moment of true wildness in It's Kind of a Funny Story, which never gets any more outrageous than projective vomiting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Don't you hate movies where one character is so much smarter than everyone else? That's only one problem with Spy Game, a glossy, suffocatingly predictable star vehicle for Robert Redford and Brad Pitt.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Trimming half an hour from this bloated, 143-minute blockbuster would have highlighted the film's treasures, not the least of which is Johnny Depp's endearingly eccentric performance as Captain Jack Sparrow.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    I adore Frances McDor mand, but she's seriously miscast in a title role Emma Thompson could play in her sleep.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Unfortunately, director Marc Foster (who co-wrote the screenplay) never allows anyone except Mitchell to play more than a one-dimensional character.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Sweet, funny, well-acted and nicely shot on locations in the south of France -- but on the dull side overall.
    • New York Post

Top Trailers