For 2,481 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Lou Lumenick's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Captain Phillips
Lowest review score: 0 Dirty
Score distribution:
2481 movie reviews
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Wants to be a "Last Tango in Paris" for the new millennium, but its flaccid dramatization and hollow moralizing doesn't rise even to the level of last year's "An Affair of Love," let alone Bertolucci's masterpiece.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The two male actors are very good, but Juuso is particularly amusing and touching as the earthy heroine.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Lou Lumenick
    Glossy, big-budget thriller that qualifies as the season's biggest and most rewarding surprise.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    A classic social drama in the proud tradition of "Norma Rae," "Silkwood" and "Erin Brockovich."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    The film is extremely well-acted, and Berri is very good at demonstrating why the relationship is doomed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A fascinating snapshot of contemporary teenagers.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A feast of great acting, although in the final analysis it's a filmed stage play rather than a brilliant movie.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    What we’ve got is a highly entertaining nautical version of “The Towering Inferno’’ (still my favorite guilty pleasure of all time).
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    America Ferrara ("Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants'') turns in an image-changing role as a tough lesbian officer who develops a grudging admiration for our heroes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Gibson sure knows how to shoot a sequence, but he also doesn't know when to stop with the blood, gore and maiming.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Sputnik Mania has a happy ending, thanks to German scientist Werner von Braun, who had been recruited for America after designing Nazi rockets that rained terror on England during World War II.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Thankfully, Tintin is Spielberg at his most playful and unpretentious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Classy old-school horror, James Wan’s The Conjuring depends more on its excellent cast and atmospheric direction than cheap gimmicks to raise hairs on the back of your neck. Which it does, quite frequently.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Sarandon gets great support from a cast that includes J.K. Simmons as a laid-back retired cop who pursues Minnie, and Jason Ritter as the ex-boyfriend whom Minnie desperately plots to reunite with her daughter.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Hopkins' larger-than-life performance as the crusty and crafty Burt rivets your attention for two solid hours in this most entertaining labor of love.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Very much a feminist Western — one painting a vivid picture of how difficult it was for even a strong and determined woman to survive in frontier days.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    In this pretentious art-house downer version of "The Bad Seed," the only surprise is that the folks didn't ship the little monster off to the looney bin before he reached puberty.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The house itself - which walks down the street in one impressive scene - is memorably voiced by Kathleen Turner.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    While highly entertaining and sometimes inspired, Black Mass is more like Scorsese lite. In perhaps the most memorable sequence, Bulger sardonically tests a childhood friend (Joel Edgerton) for loyalty by teasing out a “secret” steak sauce in what’s basically a reworking/homage of Joe Pesci’s famous “I’m funny, how?” scene in “GoodFellas.”
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Only sporadically entertaining.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 25 Lou Lumenick
    The Hateful Eight is basically an expensive vanity project allowing Tarantino to expound on his bizarre theories about race relations.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Lou Lumenick
    Deserved an end-of-the-year prestige release, is a true work of art in a marketplace filled with velvet paintings. It's positively magical, the reason we loved movies in the first place.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Mostly, the gorgeously shot Queen and Country depicts Bill and his more rebellious mate Percy pursuing beautiful women with varying degrees of success — and pulling pranks on their exasperated superiors, hilariously portrayed by David Thewlis and Richard E. Grant.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    For Your Consideration isn't quite in a class with Guest's earlier films like "Waiting for Guffman," "Best in Show" and "A Mighty Wind," which is not to say it isn't uproariously funny.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    An utterly beguiling tale.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A beautifully acted if fairly poky coming-of-age story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Mark Becker's Romantico is beautifully realized on old-fashioned film. And that's only part of its charms.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Highly entertaining.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    Aside from the very occasional stab with a dagger, John prefers to shoot people at point-blank range. It gets old fast.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    He’s great as a celebrity chef who’s forced to re-examine his priorities in this extremely funny and big-hearted comedy that Favreau also wrote.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    It's full of funny stuff, from a hitman forced to drag along his 3-year-old when he can't get a sitter, to one of the goons being asked, "Do you have a Web presence?"
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A huge hit in China — where it was released in 3-D IMAX — the handsomely filmed Journey To the West deserves better than the token 2-D theatrical release it’s getting in the United States to support its simultaneous arrival on video-on-demand.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Stands in stark contrast to the quickie political documentaries that have flooded into specialty venues since last year.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Doesn't sugarcoat the difficulties faced by this family, but this small gem has a very satisfying ending.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Aniston's best on-screen performance since "The Good Girl."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    As irresistible as movie-theater popcorn - a lavish, reasonably intelligent, well-acted sequel with kick-butt effects that outdoes its predecessor, 2000's "X-Men," in almost every department.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Despite some plot holes, Delirious, hits the bull's-eye with razor-sharp performances and dialogue.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Like legendary producer Val Lewton in the '40s, director Oren Peli, who shot "Paranormal" in seven days in his own home, understands that what's most frightening is what you don't see but merely suggested.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    Basically a carefully airbrushed and authorized portrait of the Gray Lady during 14 months when there was serious speculation about the paper's impending demise.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Filmed largely in black and white, The Cool School includes interviews with one of the gallery's founders, Ed Kienholz, as well as with Dennis Hopper, Dean Stockwell and architect Frank Gehry.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Arguably the darkest episode in the entire series (and the first to carry a PG-13 rating) the visually stunning "Sith" is also the fastest-paced and most accessible.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    A gorgeous snooze, somewhere between imitation Terrence Malick and a feature version of star Brad Pitt's notorious Vanity Fair layout with Angelina Jolie and their faux kids.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    This is a slickly entertaining package, beautifully photographed on well-chosen locations with an unerring sense of pace by Gregory Hoblit.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Accurately described as an Icelandic version of Pedro Almodovar's gender-bending black comedies -- but it's also reminiscent of early Woody Allen movies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Watching The Italian Job in a theater makes you long for a fast-forward button - to skip past 90 eyeball-glazing minutes of generic caper plotting and cut to the chase, as it were.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Even in support of the noblest of causes, manipulation is manipulation.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Holy ship! Crowe’s grumpy Noah and his dysfunctional clan help God reboot the too-wicked world in this imaginative (but hardly sacrilegious) and visually spectacular elaboration on Genesis.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Sweet without being sticky and funny without getting silly, Whip It introduces Barrymore as a director with a keen eye, a good ear for tone and an inspired touch with actors.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    Even an engaging performance by Margot Robbie as the proverbial last woman on Earth isn’t enough to save Z for Zachariah from becoming yet another ploddingly pretentious Sundance dud.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 25 Lou Lumenick
    A real head-scratcher that somehow won the grand jury prize at this year's Sundance Film Festival.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Should make Polley, memorable in "The Sweet Hereafter" and "Go," into a bona-fide star.
    • New York Post
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    So smooth and satisfying it makes the similar "Ocean's Eleven" look like a game of three-card monte.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    This film is so funny it may be beside the point to complain that, as in many Apatow productions, the writing and direction are still in something of a state of arrested development.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Plays like a very good TV movie. Short on visual flair and starpower, Thirteen Days is not the definitive story of the Cuban missile crisis, but it's an engrossing historical lesson nonetheless.
    • New York Post
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    An enthralling 3-D IMAX documentary.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The feature directorial debut of Jake Schreier, has a smart script by C.D. Ford and an impressive supporting cast.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    As formulaic in its own way as anything mainstream Hollywood turns out, In Bruges is also a fish-out-of-water comedy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    It's got more imagination than half a dozen movies combined; there's nothing else out there like this, and to me that's a very good thing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Sporadically entertaining, occasionally quite funny.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Rogers gives a brave performance, but there isn't much chemistry between Bridges and Basinger, who were teamed to better effect in 1987's "Nadine."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Holds your attention for a while, but fails to build much suspense as it races toward a predictable climax. It probably would have worked better as a series of Webisodes, which reportedly was the original plan.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Excellent performances by a good cast and a fairly authentic look at working-class struggles go only so far.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    An intoxicating attack on the homogenization of wines around the world - a "Fahrenheit 9/11" for the oneophile set.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Norton, returning to cracking form, doesn't try to make the selfish and smug Monty sympathetic -- but he lights up the screen, especially in two fantasy sequences.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Basically a two-hour argument for regime change that isn't half as incendiary or persuasive as its maker would have you believe.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Harden and Pantoliano (especially) can be two of the most over-the-top performers in the business, but they don't strike a false note in Canvas - and neither does this heartbreaking movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Leguizamo knocks it out of the park as an armored car driver in The Take.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 25 Lou Lumenick
    The bottom line of Last Days seems to be, fame's a bitch. Yes, Gus - now start making movies again that tell stories, please.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Bracing and stylish thriller.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    I'm not generally a huge fan of movies with two-or three-person casts -- they tend to resemble filmed plays -- but The Business of Strangers is a knockout.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Besides terrific performances, it boasts terrific cinematography by Giles Nuttgens that contrasts stunningly beautiful and grimly ugly Scottish landscapes - complementing the hunky Joe's ugly soul, which manifests itself in a truly nasty sex scene involving pudding, catsup and Cathie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Lou Lumenick
    Pure magic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Walken was largely typecast in quirky roles as a result of playing the title character's brother in "Annie Hall," so it's something of a delightful irony that 35 years later, Walken finds his most rewarding role leading a terrific ensemble in what amounts to one of the best Woody Allen movies that Allen wasn't involved in making.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Newcomer Friend, a Leonardo DiCaprio lookalike who can also be seen in small roles in "The Libertine" and "Pride & Prejudice," has a winning manner, but Mrs. Palfrey at the Claremont is a terrific, long-overdue vehicle for Lady Olivier.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Sophisticated entertainment of the less-is-more school.
    • New York Post
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    It's a drawn-out look at politics that's largely devoid of the trademark humor that long ago got New Wave veteran Chabrol labeled the Gallic Hitchcock.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Open Range could easily have lost 20 minutes in the editing room, but its very casual pacing and beautiful vistas - gorgeously photographed in British Columbia by James Munro - are a soothing alternative in a season of movies seemingly aimed at sufferers of attention deficit disorder.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Provides a fascinating tour of the city's past.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    It's not up to the high standard of the Clooney-Heslov script for "Good Night, and Good Luck,'' or what you'd imagine that, say, Aaron Sorkin could have done with this premise (for starters, sharper dialogue). Or what Elaine May did with the similarly themed "Primary Colors" 13 years ago.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    This is a gifted director who actually has something to say and knows how to say it. We'll be hearing from him again.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The acting is first-rate, and remarkably there's no sense that the sometimes tough material (which barely skirts an R rating) has been watered down to make it more palatable for a wider audience. I just wish Chbosky had changed that terrible title for the movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The eloquent narration forSaint of 9/11 is delivered by Ian McKellen.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    It's an engaging piece of filmmaking on its own, beautifully shot and acted.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    There's little sense of the Carol Channing beneath the overdone makeup - if there is one.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Given the rarity of such movies, and such opportunities for an actress like Clarkson, Cairo Time earns some indulgence for a pace that Westerners may find languid.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Basically "Jumanji" in outer space -- and even without Robin Williams, this is still a singularly loud, charmless and overbearing family movie that could use a hit or two of Ritalin.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Good grief! This painfully sincere animated feature seems aimed less at contemporary kids than nostalgic adults who might buy toys marketed for what is being billed as the 50th anniversary of the Peanuts gang for their children and grandchildren.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    Though it boasts excellent performances by Anna Friel and Michelle Williams as bosom buddies whose lives meander over three decades, it plods on with a wearying predictability and some truly terrible dialogue.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Much more rewarding than its earnest title or its very modest production values -- it's basically an ambitious home video -- would suggest.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    A head-clearing, mind-blowing blast from the past - one of the year's best.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 25 Lou Lumenick
    Hard-core Hollywood haters will best appreciate Maps to the Stars, a campy poison-pen letter to Tinseltown that makes “Sunset Boulevard’’ look like a tourism infomercial by comparison.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 25 Lou Lumenick
    Neither a concert film nor a documentary but a ghoulish “event” offered just in time for Halloween, This is It is sadly -- and reprehensively, if you ask me -- the movie equivalent to the National Enquirer’s infamous post-mortem shot of Elvis Presley.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Had me watching through misty eyes, at least for the first half.
    • New York Post
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Eloquent testimony about the moral ambiguity of war from veterans, human rights officials and Iraqi refugees, several of whom worked as extras on "Three Kings."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A cut above the season’s other belated sequels like “My Big Fat Greek Wedding 2’’ and “Zoolander 2.’’
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The documentary was filmed in the 1990s by Denny Tedesco, whose father Tommy is credited as the most recorded guitarist in history, including the instantly identifiable themes to “Bonanza” and “Mission: Impossible.”
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Once in a Lifetime, which is being released at the peak of World Cup fever, is the sort of sports documentary that will appeal even to nonfans. It's a quintessential only-in-New York story.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Mr. Holmes, derived from a novel by Mitch Cullin, isn’t quite as deep or as poignant, but amply rewards McKellen and Holmes fans willing to go with its leisurely pace.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    If Ruby were more of a person than a character, we might care more for her plight. But like Calvin, Kazan has written herself into a corner that can only lead to embracing the sappy romantic clichés that Ruby Sparks tries half-heartedly to mock.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A rousing, garage-band-style documentary.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Well worth seeing for its acting and its tempting cinematography. Don't be surprised if you find yourself wanting to book a vacation in Cobh.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The stunning visuals in DreamWorks Animation’s Kung Fu Panda 3 surpass the high standards set by its predecessors, but storywise, the latest adventures of goofy Po the panda break no new ground.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A physically impressive, well-acted, sometimes emotionally powerful - and mostly apolitical - re-creation of that awful day that has some conservative pundits praising Stone as some sort of born-again patriot.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A star is born in In Good Company, which showcases Topher Grace.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Some advice: Don't even bother trying to figure out what's going on in Ghost in the Shell 2: Innocence -- just sit back and enjoy the lush, trippy visuals.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Fairly suspenseful.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A gritty, well-acted, documentary-style drama.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    An entertaining documentary.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 25 Lou Lumenick
    Pointless and mind-numbing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    There's very little doubt in my mind that somewhere, culinary legend Julia Child is fuming about being consigned to a double bio-pic with a whiny, self-centered cooking blogger.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    For maximum enjoyment, see this on the enormous classic IMAX screen.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    For me, the movie's high point comes when Tony auditions for a role in a Martin Scorsese movie. Tony learns not to try so hard -- a lesson that Garcia also seems to have absorbed from City Island.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    A lot more stupid action - and a lot less heart - than the character-driven original, as Stuart ends up rescuing Margalo from Falcon.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Schrader's strongest movie since "Affliction," is another meditation on American masculinity powerfully told with great wit and style.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Through it all, Clayman struggles to keep himself, and OC87, on track - and it's easy to cheer his ultimate triumph.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Solid family entertainment, a handsomely crafted and well-acted new film version of Natalie Babbitt's classic 1975 children's book.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Gorgeously detailed animated adventure.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    More amusing than laugh-out-loud hilarious, but is never boring.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Ken Marino of "Dawson's Creek," who wrote the somewhat autobiographical script, plays one of Rudd's pals.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Short, sweet, raunchy and often screamingly funny.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A surprisingly upbeat look at that Middle East hotspot.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Fight Club badly wants to be "A Clockwork Orange" for the millennium - and succeeds to a surprising extent until director David Fincher ends up sucker-punching the audience.
    • New York Post
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Like the Master of Suspense's best films, Double Take (which makes great use of Bernard Herrmann's haunting "Psycho" score) is an intellectual puzzle that also works as a thoroughly accessible entertainment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 25 Lou Lumenick
    If I weren't already being paid to watch this movie, I'd feel entitled to compensation for having to sit through this many product plugs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Truth also ignores Rather’s famous showboating, pettiness and hubris. He’s worked in lower-profile gigs since, but trust me, there’s a good reason why no news organization will touch Mapes with a 10-foot pole.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    an overstuffed, overlong epic with a tongue-in-cheek approach.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    This wacky former Andy Warhol superstar more than holds your interest in an offbeat documentary.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A blood- freezing German thriller, a very stylish variation on "The Silence of the Lambs" and "Seven."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    At heart a rather chilly and clinical portrait of four very selfish people.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The poster art for Nanette Burstein's American Teen, which follows five students through their senior year at a high school in Indiana, is modeled after the one for "The Breakfast Club." So, to a large extent, is this ultra-slick and predictable documentary.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 25 Lou Lumenick
    I've had root canals that were more enjoyable than Margot at the Wedding, Noah Baumbach's hugely pretentious, ugly and annoying follow-up to "The Squid and the Whale."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Strikingly photographed, Maelstrom, which explores its nautical themes in non-linear fashion, is not for all tastes. But I, for one, was hooked by this fish's tale.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Rambling, mildly engaging micro-budgeted indie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    Overlong and grim to the point where some scenes are virtually unwatchable.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Overall, it's a hand-tailored job in a marketplace filled with off-the-rack movies.
    • New York Post
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    The Good Dinosaur is no instant classic like its sublime predecessor “Inside Out,” but is modestly pleasing in its own way.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A visually dazzling summer treat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Thanks to the extraordinary performance of Cotillard, who expertly lip- syncs to Piaf recordings and disappears into the part, few will regret seeing La Vie En Rose, named after a famous Piaf tune. Just brace yourself for a film of unvarying intensity that seems longer than its 140-minute running time.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    There are probably enough moments to satisfy hard-core fans, but for the rest of us, this amounts to the Middle Earth equivalent of “Star Wars: Episode II — Attack of the Clones,’’ a space-holding, empty-headed epic filled with characters and places (digital and otherwise) that are hard to keep straight, much less care about.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Even with a clever final twist straight out of "The Twilight Zone," this crummy-looking two-hander is a tough sit.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Although director Lee Daniels dials things down a bit here, subtlety is not what he does. That strategy worked for “Precious’’ but turned his more recent “The Paperboy’’ into a feature-length howler.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Smart, scary -- and at times very funny -- horror movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Has enough heart and smarts to recommend it as one of the season's worthier family entertainments.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A muscular, endlessly twisty homage to film noir capers like "The Asphalt Jungle."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Combines big laughs, a big heart and thoroughly winning characters to become the first big surprise of the fall season.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Full of action and silliness that will delight rug rats, but it's still hip and absurd enough to entertain grown-ups, too.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Though the story may be cut from the same cloth as the female-empowering "Divine Secrets of the Ya-Ya Sisterhood," it's never as cute, cloying or overbearing as that movie eventually became.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The recent trend in political documentaries is for filmmakers to heap ridicule and sarcasm on people they don't agree with, a la Michael Moore. Waiting for Armageddon (which has nothing to do with the 1998 Michael Bay movie) demonstrates that sometimes it's far more devastating to simply point the camera at your subjects and let them talk.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Fairly entertaining, if hardly surprising, results.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Though dated and unsophisticated compared to the much cooler Bourne spy thrillers, M:i:III will probably hit the sweet spot at the box-office - and give Cruise a whole new reason to start jumping on couches.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Basically a watered-down collage of scenes from "Heathers," "Clueless," "Sixteen Candles" and numerous other teen flicks.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Sometimes dull and mostly uninspired, it's much less a satisfying reboot like "Batman Begins'' than a pointless rehash in the mode of "Superman Returns.''
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The Infiltrator satisfyingly builds to an improbable but ripped-from-the-headlines climax.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Hope Springs could have been unbearably schmaltzy or crude. Instead, in the hands of these expert actors and filmmakers, it's a warm and wryly affecting mid-summer treat.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    This absorbing documentary, which has already been shown on cable, is getting a theatrical run to capitalize on the Broadway musical "Taboo."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Aimed squarely at the under-6 crowd, is basically the pilot for a Nickelodeon series with an already heavily merchandised character.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Does a solid job of documenting the life and art of the drag grand dame, whose life has been almost as tumultuous as the characters played by the Hollywood divas he channels.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Perhaps the most fascinating vintage footage...depicts what happened in 1961 when the city sent police into Washington Square Park to stop the longtime Sunday practice of singing without a required permit.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Sticks to reporting. Unlike most political documentaries, it doesn't preach - to the choir or to anyone else.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    This is one of those movies that's too cool to have a plot.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Not always totally credible and it cheats a bit on the fixed point of view. But a terrific and brave performance by Talancon makes this far superior to the generic thrillers churned out by the big studios.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Pulls no punches - blood flows very freely (including the ear-cutting scene) and black humor abounds.
    • New York Post
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    It's a far more effective leftist argument than the bombastic "Fahrenheit 9/11."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    An impeccably acted and directed - but quite icy - portrait of deception and betrayal.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    There are touching interviews with a couple of former inmates...The most riveting part of The Decomposition of the Soul is their return to the prison, which was closed in 1989 and turned into a memorial to its victims.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Theron is very good as a woman struggling for respect in a sexist environment. There are also small but telling performances by Susan Sarandon as Hank's worried wife, and Frances Fisher as a topless bartender who aids in the investigation.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Formulaic but entertaining, My Best Friend climaxes with a lengthy, surprisingly heartfelt sequence set on the French version of "Who Wants To Be a Millionaire."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The Good Lie may not be anything like Witherspoon’s version of “The Blind Side” (as the ads also imply), but it’s a heart-tugger that’s definitely worth seeing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    There's an air of extreme predictability and inevitability in the script - which takes liberties like moving the climactic debate from the University of Southern California to the grander precincts of Harvard.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 25 Lou Lumenick
    The Oscar-winning director of "Rain Man" - whose last film, the abysmal documentary "PoliWood" never went much further than the Tribeca Film Festival - demonstrates he can make a shakycam found-footage horror movie every bit as fake-looking, clumsy and unscary as your average college student working on a $200 budget.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    Relentlessly mediocre cartoon.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The acting is OK, but none of the leads has the kind of sizzle that might have turned this into something as special as another film set roughly in the same era, "Diner.''
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    The Conjuring 2 belongs to Wilson and Farmiga as the sincere, loving, slightly square Warrens, with Wan tightening the screws for a rousing series of cliffhangers that should have audiences screaming. Expect another sequel for sure.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Clearly a labor of love for all involved. Listen carefully on the soundtrack and you’ll hear the voice of Joanne Woodward as Ellie’s mom. Woodward is one of the executive producers of this lovely little film, which is dedicated to her late husband, Paul Newman.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The Depp sequence is especially poignant, apparently rewritten with references to other celebrities who died before their time -- Rudolph Valentino, James Dean and Princess Di -- and who will remain "forever young" in our imaginations.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Brilliantly playing doomed '50s sex bomb Marilyn Monroe, Michelle Williams gets under the skin of the troubled yet vulnerable icon in a way no one else ever has.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    It’s much more lively than “On the Road,” last year’s snoozy adaptation of the Kerouac novel that presented fictionalized versions of some of the same characters.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Often thrilling, sometimes charming, occasionally clunky family entertainment that perhaps wisely doesn't attempt to scale the heights of "Raiders of the Lost Ark."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    It's a welcome alternative to the homogenized Hollywood releases that proliferate during the holiday season.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Fairly shapeless story.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Except for a couple of isolated, mildly subversive moments, Hanks is basically playing the genial host of “The Wonderful World of Disney’’ rather than an actual person.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Sally Hawkins is the heart and soul of Made in Dagenham, but another actress to watch for is the equally wonderful Rosamund Pike. She steals every scene she's in as the sympathetic wife of Rita's sexist boss (Rupert Graves).
    • 65 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    The best evidence of this troubled man's genius is provided by ample samples of his music, much of which will be familiar to fans of Warner Bros. cartoons from the '30s and '40s.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A wonder to look at, even as its increasingly pretentious manga-inspired story line outstays its welcome.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Less an awful movie than a totally uninspired one. The under-5 set may find it funny, though I suspect their parents will be checking their watches a lot, as I did.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Rambles on for nearly two hours with subplots that go nowhere -- and half-baked leftist political commentary -- before focusing in for a quietly devastating climax.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Acceptably diverting Saturday night at the movies, especially if you're willing to check your brains at the popcorn stand.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Merely a passably amusing excuse to pass a couple of hours in an air-conditioned theater.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Though Water Lilies endlessly teases the audience with its sapphic subtext and young female flesh, Sciamma seems most interested in showing how extremely cruel adolescent girls can be to each other.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Tender and often extremely funny.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The film's most memorable performance is by Eamonn Walker, who is scarily good as the singer known as Howlin' Wolf.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Find Me Guilty belongs to the odd couple of Dinklage and Diesel, whose volatile performance finally proves he is much more than an action star.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    At times, writer-director Cedric Klapsich seems to be trying to copy the frestyle of "Amelie," but L'Auberge achieves only a fraction of its charm.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Beautifully shot but a soulless cash machine, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 delivers no dramatic payoff, no resolution and not much fun. Hopefully we'll get that in the final installment next summer.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The posthumous campaign to polish Michael Jackson's tarnished reputation continues apace with this Spike Lee infomercial, commissioned by Sony and the money-grubbing Jackson estate to promote the 25th anniversary of his 1987 album "Bad.''
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    What is Dick's excuse for outing one cable news anchor but not a rival counterpart who is far better known? The anchor isn't antigay, but Dick likes the other network's politics better. Hypocrisy? Your call.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    There isn't a surprising moment, and it's an affirmation for hard-core fans and pretty much everyone else of William Shatner's immortal exhortation to Trekkies: "Get a life!"
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    There's nothing startlingly original about Estevez's screenplay, yet it has a modesty you seldom see when Hollywood tackles spiritual subjects.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Altman and Rapp skirt the fine line between satire and caricature, stopping just short of ridiculing the women who pack Dr. T's office.
    • New York Post
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Thanks to Hudson and the other women, it's a moderately beguiling date movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A collection of such dazzling digital illusions you can't wait for it to hit DVD so you can freeze individual images.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Refreshing for its simplicity and its originality in a marketplace dominated by soulless blockbusters.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Weds half-hearted thriller elements to the self-absorbed, no-budget mumblecore films pioneered by Katz in efforts like "Dance Party, USA."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Lou Lumenick
    There’s no shortage of brains, brawn, eye candy, wit and even some poetry in this epic battle between massive lizard-like monsters and 25-story-high robots operated by humans.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Genuinely creepy Southern Gothic thriller that once again proves that in horror movies, sometimes less is actually more.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Adoration, which hinges on a number of coincidences, contains some really fine performances.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Weitz keeps the schmaltz in check, but it's clear pretty much from the outset that this immigrant family is fated never to find A Better Life north of the border.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Disappointingly skin-deep and almost shockingly wholesome, Mary Harron's The Notorious Bettie Page lives up to neither its title nor its advertising slogan, "the pin-up sensation that shocked the nation."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Strictly a love it-or-hate-it proposition, it requires viewers to work at a movie with a narrative that could support at least half a dozen interpretations.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Williams triumphs by exceeding both in sheer actor's craft - and the depths he plumbs in his character's tortured soul.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Though there are moderately interesting interviews interspersed throughout, Deadheads will want to see the numbers, in which Grisman's more formal style complements Garcia's looser approach to his music.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    If you were wondering what “12 Years a Slave” might have been like as a two-part episode of “Masterpiece Theatre,” you might want to check out this unsatisfying but not uninteresting oddity. It renders another historical story about race with exquisite taste but not much in the way of passion.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The most gut-bustingly funny movie so far this year.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Michael Caine and Harvey Keitel do some of the best work of their careers playing longtime friends navigating their twilight years in Paolo Sorrentino’s witty, wise and swooningly beautiful dramatic comedy Youth.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Works its way to an improbably cheerful ending, but getting there is a slow trip.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The kind of small gem that's becoming increasingly rare in American films.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    "Love, Actually" meets "Trainspotting" in Intermission, an edgy Irish romantic comedy that deftly juggles a dozen interconnected story lines.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    It's the best role in years for Leoni, but You Kill Me really belongs to Kingsley, whose character's deadpan reactions to his new environment are priceless. He really kills.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Cam (based on the director’s real-life father) is so charming and gifted in various ways that it’s easy to enjoy this fanciful look at a bohemian mixed-race family.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Don Cheadle gives one of the best performances of his career as jazz legend Miles Davis in Miles Ahead, even if his debut as a director ends up being an unfocused disappointment.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A real old-fashioned crowd-pleaser.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Clever, racially and sexually provocative variation on "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?"
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    One of our best actors, Turturro surpasses his past fine work as Alexander Luzhin.
    • New York Post
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Vastly more explicit (be warned) and intelligent (than "Angel Eyes"). It also leads to much darker - and more interesting - places.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A thorough but highly entertaining documentary details the making of the notorious 1972 film, the series of legal battles that helped make it immensely popular and the flick's considerable cultural legacy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    The Road to Guantanamo is a missed opportunity. This is a subject that deserves a more thoughtful documentary or docudrama, not a hastily thrown together amalgam of the two.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Veteran character actor Dennis Farina gives one of the best performances of the year in a rare lead part as an aging, down-on-his luck small-time hood in The Last Rites of Joe May.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    Hopefully Jennifer Lawrence will actually be given something worthwhile to do next time around. That would actually be worth paying to see.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Documents the Nixon administration's failed, almost comically inept attempt to deport the most political of The Beatles and his wife, Yoko Ono. Given the latter's cooperation with the filmmakers, it comes as no surprise the Lennons come off as saints.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Mock didn't find room for any of the many critics who accuse Kushner of being an anti-Zionist - and the film unfortunately ends in 2004, just before its subject began working on his controversial script for Steven Spielberg's "Munich."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Lee hasn't given an interview in 45 years, and even her 99-year-old sister (still practicing as a lawyer) only hazards a guess in Mary Murphy's old-school documentary: Her younger sister had nothing to prove, and nowhere to go but down after her astonishing debut novel.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A bittersweet confection that few holiday filmgoers will be able to resist, thanks to melt-in-your-mouth performances by Juliette Binoche, Alfred Molina and Judi Dench.
    • New York Post
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    It's basically a Middle Eastern version of "The Princess Bride" with an assisted-suicide subplot.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Frequently hilarious, occasionally sweet and often graphically violent, Pineapple Express may not be the greatest stoner movie ever made, but it will do perfectly well until we get another hit of Harold and Kumar.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The crowd-pleasing St. Vincent provides Murray with his first comic vehicle in years. It’s a tour de force and a cause for major celebration.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Beautifully photographed by Dean Semler, Appaloosa is the best Western since "Open Range" and shows there's still life in this most unfashionable of genres.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    As in genuine porn, most of the acting (except for Skarsgard, who deliberately tries to be funny and sometimes succeeds) is as flat and uninteresting as the script — even when the older Joe narrates a montage of flaccid penises.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The ruefully funny Jack Goes Boating, which, refreshingly, takes a generous view of its flawed characters, is a must for us many Hoffman fans.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Overall, though, this new Peter Pan does really soar.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    It's an intriguing setup, filled with colorful characters, lots of humor and well-developed scenes.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Mitchell's adventurous, big- hearted, pansexual mosaic of New Yorkers looking for love and orgasms (not necessarily in that order), is a rare example of a nonporn film that doesn't exploit graphic sex as a gimmick.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Achieves the odd distinction of being the first post-9/11 NYPD corruption movie - complete with a shootout in the Criminal Courts building. Cool.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Story of Tobias Schneebaum, a gay New York artist famous for living with, sleeping with - and, gulp, eating with - cannibals in New Guinea.
    • New York Post
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Though it comes from a director whose résumé includes "Flashdance" and "9 ½ weeks," these smoke-filled interludes are less erotic than today's average car commercial.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 25 Lou Lumenick
    The only thing remotely scary about Monsters is that Magnolia is releasing this boring scare-, suspense- and gore-free horror movie (which reportedly cost less than $100,000) on Halloween weekend.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Return comes briefly to life when John Slattery of "Mad Men'' turns up as an acerbic yet sympathetic reclusive drunk whom Kelli meets during court-mandated rehab. But it's not enough for a film that limps along to a pretty much preordained climax.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Godardian title not withstanding, Zeina Durra's not-uninteresting slice of the downtown Manhattan demimonde is too concerned with being cool to work up much in the way of political outrage, much less narrative drive.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Quirky and sometimes hilarious Canadian comedy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Steamy and solidly entertaining.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    It's a tribute to the sheer professionalism of this crossover charmer that it holds your interest for two solid hours.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Twohy serves up a hard-to-swallow second-act twist and an unconvincing back story, but the slightly overlong A Perfect Getaway recovers with a pulse-pounding climax.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    I loved both "Walk the Line" and "Ray," but it will be hard to watch either one with a straight face again after the skewering they get in this Judd Apatow production, which quotes scene after scene to hilarious effect.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    It goes down as smoothly as a milkshake thanks to an impressive cast.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Not even a compelling performance by Al Pacino as Shylock can make The Merchant of Venice work in its first major big-screen adaptation.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A rousing, politically correct, Muslim-sympathetic, $140 million take on the Crusades.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Sarah Silverman: Jesus is Magic works best when this equal-opportunity offender is on the stage.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Slight and unremarkable.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Covers three years in the Public Defender's office with a fast-paced, tabloid gusto.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Out of the Furnace is much longer on style and belligerence than actual substance.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    As cleverly adapted by Tom Stoppard, this is an Anna Karenina that's pretty much guaranteed to polarize audiences.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Demonstrates that not only is sisterhood powerful, it can be awfully entertaining.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    The movie is a visual feast, with Oscar-caliber sets and costumes that for many will justify the trip to the Paris Theatre.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Chemistry is the usually misfiring engine that drives romantic comedies, so it's a pleasure to report that Justin Timberlake and Mila Kunis are practically combustible together in Friends With Benefits.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The 3-D effects are among the most effective ever shot.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Despite some remarkable unembedded footage, Andrew Berends' is yet another disappointingly superficial, unfocused and one-sided documentary on the conflict in Iraq.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    There's not a moment of true wildness in It's Kind of a Funny Story, which never gets any more outrageous than projective vomiting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    What makes Storm Surfers 3-D mesmerizing is jaw-dropping footage shot inside brute waves that’s unlike any I’ve ever seen before.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    While type-A Pierson worries about his projectionist showing up and a break-in at his family's home, his wife frets that the mass importation of American films will contaminate the local culture.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    This multi-pronged labor of love doesn't always work, but it often does, sometimes in ways that take your breath away.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    It's worth seeing the movie for Hathaway alone.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A raunchy, endearing and often hilarious cross between “Back to the Future” and Reagan-era cheese-fests such as “Hot Dog: The Movie.”
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Don't you hate movies where one character is so much smarter than everyone else? That's only one problem with Spy Game, a glossy, suffocatingly predictable star vehicle for Robert Redford and Brad Pitt.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Another remarkable addition to Eastwood's directorial canon.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    Zoo
    A bizarre quasi-documentary that more or less tries to rationalize bestiality as a harmless quirk.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Rob the Mob, which is more fun and more tightly constructed than “American Hustle,’’ romanticizes the clueless couple, whom the columnist dubs “Bonnie and Clyde,” and moves their inevitable Christmas Eve date with fate from Ozone Park to a far more attractive location.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Trimming half an hour from this bloated, 143-minute blockbuster would have highlighted the film's treasures, not the least of which is Johnny Depp's endearingly eccentric performance as Captain Jack Sparrow.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    The Congress doesn’t fully live up to its lofty ambitions, but it does attempt something most filmmakers wouldn’t even dream of — a dystopian blend of live-action and animation that acidly comments on some of Hollywood’s touchiest issues before drifting off into an existential fog.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 12 Lou Lumenick
    This time out, Broomfield comes up with maybe enough halfway decent material for a 10-minute segment on a second-rate tabloid TV show.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Mixes fact and speculation in a way that's already raised the ire of some on the right as well as on the left.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Screenwriter Steve Kloves still seems overly dedicated to cramming in every detail of J.K. Rowling's novel - while tacking on a schmaltzy Hollywood ending.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Perhaps the most sobering statistic in The 11th Hour: Some 50,000 species a year are disappearing. Someday, it might be humans.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    I adore Frances McDor mand, but she's seriously miscast in a title role Emma Thompson could play in her sleep.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Lou Lumenick
    Admittedly, I’m far from a fan of Korine’s “Gummo,’’ “Julien Donkey-Boy’’ and the absymal “Trash Humpers.’’ But that he is proud of making intentionally sloppy and tedious movies doesn’t make them any easier to watch. Or all that much fun, for that matter.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Unfortunately, director Marc Foster (who co-wrote the screenplay) never allows anyone except Mitchell to play more than a one-dimensional character.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Their often touching stories of how their lives - and livelihoods - were disrupted are effectively intercut with excerpts from press conferences in which Attorney General John Ashcroft.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A solid documentary that examines the art's roots, from ad-libs by black preachers to "toasts" delivered by Jamaican immigrants over instrumental tracks in the '70s South Bronx.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Rio
    The only character who makes much of an impression is a crazed, cannibalistic cockatoo voiced by Jemaine Clement ("Flight of the Conchords"), who gets the best of the handful of musical numbers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    A small-scale charmer that provides a tailor-made role for Malkovich, who is always fun to watch.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Sweet, funny, well-acted and nicely shot on locations in the south of France -- but on the dull side overall.
    • New York Post
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    Binder has allowed Allen, a brilliant actress, to go overboard with Terry's obnoxiousness, just as Brooks (his apparent role model) did with Téa Leoni in "Spanglish."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    One of the 10 best American movies released so far this year, Kit Kittredge: An American Girl is the surprisingly satisfying first theatrical film inspired by a long-running series of historically themed dolls.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    It's not exactly going to be on PETA's 10-best list.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    So full of solid performances and appealing characters that I wished writer/director/producer Preston Whitmore (“The Walking Dead") had considered the dictum “less is more."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    A dispiriting return to the tired, star-driven, pop-culture-ridden formula that DreamWorks Animation ran into the ground before its best feature in years, this spring's "How to Train Your Dragon."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Scorsese has great fun with a story that in the final analysis does not really demand to be taken any more seriously as history than "Inglourious Basterds."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 88 Lou Lumenick
    Pays off with emotional dividends well worth the time investment.
    • New York Post
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    Disappointing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Lou Lumenick
    Truth is, this story of the out-of-control director and his inexperienced, enabling studio heads -- who allowed Cimino to lock them out of the editing room, hoping he would deliver another Oscar winner like "The Deer Hunter" -- is more compelling than Cimino's long-winded epic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Lou Lumenick
    The overlong Amigo has its heart in the right place, but its approach to complex issues is too simplistic to win over unconverted minds.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Lou Lumenick
    I have to confess that this surreal departure by the iconoclastic filmmaker tried my patience more than a bit.

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