For 54 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 12% same as the average critic
  • 40% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Maggie Lee's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 Gangs of Wasseypur
Lowest review score: 10 The BreakUp Guru
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 27 out of 54
  2. Negative: 6 out of 54
54 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Maggie Lee
    The Tale of Princess Kaguya is a visionary tour de force, morphing from a childlike gambol into a sophisticated allegory on the folly of materialism and the evanescence of beauty.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Maggie Lee
    The love child of Bollywood and Hollywood, Gangs of Wasseypur is a brilliant collage of genres, by turns pulverizing and poetic in its depiction of violence.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Maggie Lee
    Anthony Chen is remarkably astute in his depiction of the class and racial tensions within such a household, his accessible style enabling the characters’ underlying decency and warmth to emerge unforced.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Maggie Lee
    Such is the finesse of Kore-eda’s script that it builds to neither the vehement confrontation nor the comforting reconciliation that melodrama decrees. Instead, it imparts those rare, liberating moments when characters revert to their most honest selves and pluck up the courage to express their deepest, albeit unattainable wishes.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Maggie Lee
    Heartbreaking in its depiction of ordinary lives affected by political upheaval, this ode to the fundamental values that survive even under such dire circumstances has an epic gravity that recalls another great historical romance, “Doctor Zhivago.”
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    On the one hand, the film is a gripping whodunnit, exemplified by a scene of classic Hitchcockian suspense, when Jong-gu makes a frightening discovery while snooping around the Japanese man. At the same time it treads into supernatural territory through nightmarish dream sequences that feel unnervingly real.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    It’s the nerve-racking situation that faces our hard-luck protag, with its heady black humor, social satire and a touch of surrealism, that keeps audiences on the edge of their seats.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Maggie Lee
    It’s sybaritic, cruel and luridly mesmerizing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    The director retains his controlled style even as he moves toward a more traditional narrative mode.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    Koreeda’s sensitive yet lucid helming keeps the performances precise yet natural.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Maggie Lee
    Train to Busan pulses with relentless locomotive momentum. As an allegory of class rebellion and moral polarization, it proves just as biting as Bong Joon-ho’s sci-fi dystopia “Snowpiercer,” while delivering even more unpretentious fun.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    Stephen Chow’s The Mermaid defies the time-worn nature of its material, concocting pure enchantment with the director’s own blend of nutty humor, intolerable cruelty and unabashed sweetness.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Maggie Lee
    Beguilingly simple, relaxed in its mastery and enhanced by Isabelle Huppert’s impeccable poise.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Maggie Lee
    Dutch helmer Maurice Dekkers devotes most of his film to the celebrity chef’s extensive foraging, while his abstemious staff harps on about the onerous pursuit of perfection; one crucial missing ingredient, however, is the joy of eating or cooking.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    As in most of the director’s repertoire, he portrays working class family relations with unpretentious warmth. Boasting a simple, coherent plot shot with real-time, handheld verismo, it’s a work of understated confidence.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Maggie Lee
    This directing debut by helmer-scribe Shim Sung-bo echoes Bong’s trademark cynical vision of human nature, but the characters lack dimensionality and psychological depth.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    The film’s strength really lies in its thrilling pace and robust action, elaborately choreographed and executed to involve a large ensemble of characters in a gripping way.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Maggie Lee
    Despite its magnificent natural vistas and some pulse-pounding action in stunning 3D, Wolf Totem boils down to a familiar environmentalist allegory that doesn’t move or provoke too deeply.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Maggie Lee
    Less offensively nationalistic than the second installment but falling short of the glowing humanity, genial Cantonese humor and visual flair of the first, the pic is somewhat tarnished by its pedestrian plot and limp characterization.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    The pic plays like a bonus track to the Thai auteur’s Palme d’Or winner, “Uncle Boomee Who Can Recall His Past Lives,” its esoteric symbiosis of Thai folk culture, spiritualism and current sociopolitical conditions simplified, but no less mystifying.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Maggie Lee
    Slow to heat up yet quick to burn out, police procedural-thriller Cold War 2 dramatizes internal strife and conspiracy among Hong Kong’s police force and ruling elite, adding some new twists in a narrative framework that ultimately can’t support the film.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    Although the pacing is more laidback than in “Au revoir Taipei,” the humor more rooted in believable (if bizarre) real-life situations than in slapstick shenanigans, the comic timing remains spot-on and the jokes fetchingly offbeat in an utterly Taiwanese way.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    Lost in Thailand is a boisterous, joyously hokey comedy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Maggie Lee
    Kawase embraces nature worship and pompous philosophizing in her indulgently mannerist style, which, over the course of two hours, overwhelms a small yet potentially moving story of two teenagers dealing with separation within their families.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    The Berlin File boasts knockout action setpieces that provide an impressive big-budget showcase for Ryoo Seung-wan's technical smarts.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Maggie Lee
    Notwithstanding some sentimental beats, Peng achieves a delicate balance between bleak realities and a life-affirming attitude, capped by a predictable but necessary catharsis.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Maggie Lee
    There’s little in the way of drama, character depth or mise-en-scene to distract from Tiger Chen’s technically dazzling display of human combat in Keanu Reeves’ helming debut.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    Fans of Kurosawa’s earlier psycho-thrillers may desire more eeriness and visual panache, but those who’ve accepted the helmer’s conscious change of tune and pace should be gently touched.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Maggie Lee
    Lam’s darkest work to date, one where violence is not just graphic but ugly, and Hong Kong symbolically comes to resemble a charnel house.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Maggie Lee
    The film reaches a narrative and emotional impasse once it gets past the will-they-or-won’t-they stage.

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