Maitland McDonagh

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For 2,229 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Maitland McDonagh's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Blood Tea and Red String
Lowest review score: 0 The Hottie & the Nottie
Score distribution:
2229 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Though ultimately flawed, the film's depiction of velvet-gloved cruelty and matter-of-fact betrayal is surprisingly potent, and it's pure pleasure to watch Bacall prowling the corridors of power, tossing her golden mane and tossing off world-weary observations in a voice pitched somewhere between a purr and a growl.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Eminently worth seeing, even if it leaves you wishing it were as consistently inventive as Aardman's first feature, "Chicken Run" (2000).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    There are no laughs to be had here, though, unless you count nervous titters and frat-boy sniggers at the very thought of, you know.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The minutiae of Carter's book tour isn't always enthralling, but his personality drives the film: pious, stubborn, devoted to his wife, curious, professional, warm and yet slightly removed from the fray, conciliatory, meticulous, self-effacing, funny, decent, intellectually rigorous and firmly committed to his positions.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    There's always been a wide streak of the tediously naughty little boy in Besson, and all the seductively stylized images in the world can't hide it.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    There are no surprises for anyone who's seen the earlier version, and younger horror fans may find the modest body count and restrained gore unsatisfying.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The story delivers enough twists and turns to be engaging without feeling like work, and the overall vibe is dangerous and flirty rather than brutal or excessively graphic.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Danish writer-director Ole Bornedal delivers up a stylish thriller whose murky, shot-through-pond-scum cinematography is its most distinctive feature.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While snowboarding enthusiasts will eat up every minute of its two-hour running time, it's thin stuff for the unconverted.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Though the raw material is juicy stuff, the details and the larger picture never come together and the cast is uneven.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Has a certain silly, kid-friendly charm.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Overall, it's like watching a home movie of a charming relative.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Television director David Von Ancken's metaphorical revenge Western wears its influences on its sleeve, but adds nothing to the genre that hasn't already been explored in the quietly demythologizing films of Anthony Mann and Budd Boetticher, the baroque, operatic Italian Westerns of Sergio Leone and his less-familiar peers, and even in Sam Fuller's deranged, post-Civil War psychodrama "Run of the Arrow"(1956).
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Rios is the glue that holds Johannesson's neither-fish-nor-fowl film together.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Ryan Schifrin's first film is a pleasant surprise, an old-fashioned monster movie that relies more on genuine suspense than bare breasts and blood.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The story is complex enough to be absorbing, but its pedantic quality makes it -- and its lessons -- all too easy to forget.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The cast is little more than the sum total of golden skin, firm flesh and blindingly white teeth, but in a film that demands them to be half-naked and soaking wet most of the time, looks trump technical acting skill every time.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    A window into bygone morals and mores.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Director/cowriter Adrian Garcia Bogliano's self-conscious throwback to the kind of gritty black-and-white gore films that used to play drive-in theaters and urban grind houses is a short, sharp shocker that gets surprising mileage out of the oldest formula in the book of the dead.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    A combination of muddy sound mix and players with heavy accents (particularly Chinese superstar Gong, who seems to have learned her lines phonetically) renders large swaths of dialogue incomprehensible, but the details of what's being said and done don't really matter.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Veterans Danner and Wilkinson effortlessly make Anna and Stephen more interesting than all the youngsters combined.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    This is not a film for neophytes: It proceeds from the assumption that the viewer is familiar with the events and people of Jesus' life, and is probably right in doing so: Its intended audience is seriously Christian.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's dramatically unsatisfying.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Efficient if uninspired documentary.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Jackman and McGregor are a delight to watch.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Nat comes off as flat-out crazy and more sad than amusing or heroic.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    And yes, that is Salma Hayek in the chorus line of sexily sinister nurses, perhaps repaying Taymor for lending her dramatic credibility with "Frida."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    This scrappy, ultra-low budget comedy, made in 19 days for $70,000 by North Carolina School of the Arts graduates Jody Hill, Danny McBride and Ben Best, comes with its own Cinderella tale: It debuted at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival but failed to find distribution until comedian Will Ferrell and his business partner, Adam McKay, championed it.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Philippe Diaz's controversial documentary about the legacy of the brutal 1991-2002 civil war in Sierra Leone -- widely considered the poorest country in the world, despite its rich mineral resources -- suggests that the rebel faction RUF (Revolutionary United Front of Sierra Leone) was not alone in terrorizing civilians and committing atrocities, most famously the amputation of limbs with machetes.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Seriously flawed and not for every taste, the film was shot quickly and on the cheap, and is driven by Argento's slurred, scratchy voice and Bette Davis eyes.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    B-movie stalwart Michael Madsen turns in a no-holds-barred, road-wreck performance in this nihilistic crime thriller, which plays out a variation on the old maxim that there's no honor among thieves -- even if they're cops.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    There's something disheartening about seeing real-life stories and their inevitable complexities put through the Hollywood sausage machine and transformed into bland parables about a privileged, wayward young bucks redeemed by wise, infinitely patient mentors and the self-abnegating spirit of team sports.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Her heavy-handed montage of war, civil rights demonstrations, revolutions and KKK gatherings, intercut with Shicoff's delivery of the opera's devastating fourth-act aria, is so amateurish it very nearly succeeds in trivializing the power of his performance.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Lepage maintains a leisurely pace and lets the narrative wander, but ultimately lands on the right side of the line between contemplative noodling and aimless navel-gazing, ending with an image that's simultaneously melancholy and playful.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Little Acuna -- who looks even younger than 11 -- gives a sweetly unaffected performance as the beleaguered child.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Egoyan drains the life right out of the material, and the result is a chilly, complicated thriller that's neither thrilling nor a "Through the Looking Glass" head spinner.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While it doesn't miss a cliche, it also invests every one with vigorous conviction.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Edward Zwick brings unimpeachable good intentions to his film about the bloody underbelly of the international diamond trade, but when social conscience jockeys for attention with movie-star glamour, glamour always wins. The result is a rip-snorting adventure set against the backdrop of African misery.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Malkovich pulls out all the gaudy stops.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    A perverse mixed-martial arts film in which talk trumps action.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Johnny Depp's coruscating, rigorously uningratiating performance as debauched, self-destructive 17th-century aristocrat John Wilmot, the Earl of Rochester, is the glue that doesn't quite hold together first-time director Laurence Dunmore's adaptation of Stephen Jeffreys' 1994 play.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Polished but oddly lifeless heist thriller.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    But the movie is long and didactic, undermined by the faintly pious air of an educational slide show.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Too long and its tone is disconcertingly uneven, but Perry never betrays or condescends to his characters.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While Kudlacek lets some of the elder statesmen ramble, their recollections are a vivid, firsthand window into a bygone era of American art.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The payoff fizzles, but the buildup is intriguing until it topples under its own weight.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    If only the wit weren't overwhelmed by lame jokes about body parts, functions and fluids.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Affleck's gloomy, one-note performance exacerbates the problem, but the stellar supporting cast helps compensate.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    But for all the sound, fury and spectacle, the film feels vaguely hollow and unsatisfying.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Who knew the rock 'n' roll life could be so mild?
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Fergus' thriller benefits from Pearce's high-strung performance and the stark New Mexico landscapes, but the story is familiar and the pacing much too measured for a slight tale of ineluctable fate.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's earnest, well-intentioned and scrupulously even-handed, in the style of made-for-TV problem movies.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Were there more meat on the bones of this fable about hypocrisy and spiritual hollowness, Marsh's pacing might seem deliberate rather then merely slow.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Matheson's bitterly ironic ending -- which pivots on the nature of Neville's legend -- is gutted and turned into formulaic pap.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Often rings painfully true, but would have benefited from judicious editing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    This candy-colored animated fable is an awkward mix of corny bee puns, clever sight gags, kid-friendly action, adult-centric workplace angst and Seinfeld's distinctive navel-gazing wit. And what's up with those four-legged bees?
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Embry and first-time actress Sparks have charming chemistry, but Christopher's slight screenplay wears out its welcome long before the film - which runs a scant 80 minutes - is over.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Clearly a labor of love and a call to action, but it's undermined by the sheer volume of topics it tackles in addition to the main subject.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Cheerfully gross, deliberately retro horror picture pays tongue-in-cheek homage to the kind of genre movies Charles Band and Roger Corman's companies turned out in the 1980s.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The narrative is cluttered with backstory, and the endless digressions overwhelm the efforts of a generally strong cast.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Anime enthusiasts will want to take a look, but the film is too uneven to serve as a good introduction to the form.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Despite the edifying square-up -- moral lessons about family, the legacy of violence and the tenacious power of love -- the appeal is freak-show all the way.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Jodie Foster's fiercely intelligent performance drives this disappointing thriller, whose taut, carefully constructed first half is sadly negated by its implausible and -- worst of all -- unengaging conclusion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Ti West's affectionate homage to no-frills fright flicks keeps it simple and succeeds on its own stripped-down terms.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Despite solid performances from the leads, it comes shrouded in a heavy cloud of ethics-class complications that makes it feel like a "dilemma of the week" TV movie.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Frankly, it's dumb, but no dumber than "Transformers."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Though the film verges on hagiography, Angio unearthed a treasure trove of fascinating clips, from the bored-looking writer-director leafing through his program at the 1971 Tony Awards.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Grabsky's meticulous and frequently monotonous documentary about the life and music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart comes to vivid life whenever one of the many world-class musicians who sat for interviews simultaneously describes and demonstrates exactly what's so special about particular compositions.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's an entertaining diversion whose clever structure gives pulp-crime cliches a welcome twist.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Light and sweet, comfort food dressed up with a dash of exotic spice.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's a light, silly instantly forgettable comedy peppered with action set-pieces and affectionate nods to its fondly remembered predecessor, including a gracious end-credits dedication to the late Don Adams and Edward Platt.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The goofy use of animated, Flubber-like blobs aping Robert Palmer's "Addicted to Love" video (by way of illustrating the irresistibility of desire itself) makes it hard to take the science seriously, which is the BLEEP problem in a nutshell.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    This dumbed-down spin on Jules Verne's classic adventure tale was devised as a kid-friendly roller-coaster ride, and it delivers the goods. Whether anyone over the age of eight wants the goods is another matter altogether.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The bad news is that Seitz's protagonists are almost all insufferable: Smug, self-important, opinionated and relentlessly convinced that they're far more sensitive, intelligent and interesting than they are.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    When Cox is performing, the movie is firing on all cylinders.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While Canadian writer-director Eric Nicholas has no fresh thoughts about the voyeuristic nature of movie going, he knows enough to make sure when high-tech peeper Doug (Colin Hanks, son of Tom) conceals his camera in a bag, its lens pokes out of the zipper like the big, fat metaphor it is.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's hard to watch two fine actors working themselves into a lather for so little reward.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Hugely ambitious and driven by Julianne Moore, Samuel L. Jackson and Edie Falco's fine, intense performances, Richard Price's adaptation of his own sprawling novel about a racially charged kidnapping that turns a volatile New Jersey town into a powder keg tries to tell too many stories in too little time.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's main attractions are the Charlottes, but the price of watching their eerie psychological pas de deux is to endure muddled metaphors and goofy gadgetry.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The movie has a monster problem -- the more you see of them, the less scary they are -- most of the characters are standard-issue types, and Harden seriously overdoes the pious psycho bit.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Slow, solemn going, despite its best efforts at thundering soldiers and comic-relief kings.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Donnie Yen is famous for combining martial arts traditions into his own unique fighting style and Collin Chou, who studied with Sammo Hung, is up to the task of holding his own.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    That there's precious little chemistry between buffed-and-tanned stars Parker and McConaughey is only the first of this slight, overly busy film's problems.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    If not precisely poetic in its elaborate offensiveness, it's certainly imaginative. Unfortunately, that's not the same as interesting or engaging, unless you're a dyed-in-the-wool fan.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The key to enjoying the fourth installment in this testosterone-fueled franchise is accepting that it's a live-action cartoon that makes no effort to conform to the laws of gravity, plausibility or common sense.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The product of this ingenuity is a slight spin on an obscure motion-picture artifact, but it's surprisingly artfully done.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Endearing without being especially engaging.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Baldwin dominates the screen with his slick, beefy swagger, and if Prinze is less than convincing as a kid from Brooklyn, Caan and Ferrara nail Carmine and Bobby with such assured economy that it hardly matters they're one-note roles.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's pared-down narrative is anything but aimless, and it pays off in a haunting final last scene scored with Gang of Four's "Damaged Goods."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Beautifully encapsulates the film's sensibility, a bizarre mix of reverse cool and childishness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    However fact-based the material may be, Jordan's salt-of-the-earth characters, with their bluster and pride and rough-edged loyalty, are all too familiar, and their travails feel formulaic, right down to the life-affirming climax.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Sivan's film is well acted, beautifully photographed and oddly reassuring. It comes perilously close to suggesting that the injustices of colonial rule were the product of morally weak and misguided individuals rather than a system that empowered and enriched foreign interests at the expense of locals.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    If you don't care about the characters, then everything's just a big, dumb joke.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Ultimately, Bubble is less important as a film than as an experiment in simultaneous cross-platform film distribution.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Barnes, now in his seventies and relocated by the Witness Protection Program, is shot only in silhouette, but there's plenty of footage of him in his heyday, dressed to the pimpalicious nines and playing to the cameras like a movie star.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The fact that it was shot at the picturesque Utah resort is a huge plus and the film is so unabashedly eager to please.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Bello is phenomenally good as the embittered Marcia, while Stuart and Christensen do their best with their less complex roles, but they're all undermined by Alfieri's shrill, mannered dialogue and cliched backstories that wouldn't be out of place in a dysfunction-family-of-the-week movie.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Simultaneously gorgeous and forgettable, sentimental and prurient.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Canadian-born choreographer Alison Murray draws on her own experiences as a 15-year-old runaway living in squats and on the streets, in her feature-filmmaking debut, which is a clear-eyed look at the pleasures and price of abandoning conventional mores for experimental lifestyles.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's a show we don't see, presumably because of issues with music rights, and while "much ado about nothing" might be overstating things, after more than an hour and a half of buildup, it would have been nice to see Wu-Tang perform.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Director Stephen Purvis and writer Chris Haddock never rise above the material's inherent pulpiness, but they keep the twists coming until the very end.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Shelly was murdered before she could continue developing as a writer and director, and while this, her last film, is extremely uneven and undermined by an excess of quirk, Keri Russell's performance as a pregnant pie-guru is a charmer with a bracing streak convincingly desperate determination.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Formulaic though it is, the story hits the right emotional buttons and promises that hope and dogged work trump despair.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    For parents who were unable to secure tickets for the young fans in their households, it's nothing short of a godsend.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Katzir's documentary is as much a labor of love as Spaisman's theater, and it's often rough around the edges.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Mukherjee's charm keeps the child-like Geeta from being thoroughly annoying, and the musical numbers are pleasant, if not particularly memorable.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Lurie's film never fully reconciles the story about newsroom ethics with the sentimental drama about bad dads and bereft sons.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The screenplay is blessedly free of mediocre songs and light on flashy pop-culture in-jokes.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    There's a terrific movie buried in Woody Allen's tale of two American girls broadening their horizons in Barcelona, and every once in a while tantalizing glimpses penetrate the twee narration and mannered performances.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The acting is flat, and the scientist's ideological speeches too bluntly designed to mirror post-9/11 rhetoric. But there's a dreamy fascination to the iconic images of machines fighting a perpetual war for the human creators they'll inevitably outlast.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Surprisingly compelling, if not up to dealing with the larger political issues it raises.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Wongpim pays tribute to classic Italian Westerns in his face-hugging close-ups, but his film is more silly than existentially anarchic, and its exotic quirkiness wears thin quickly.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    A risky, not entirely successful comedy about mental disability, based on the novel by Sherwood Kiraly.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Could as easily be called "Spurlock: Cultural Learnings Of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation Of America."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Barber's screenplay is mired in cliches that got old in 1935.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Packs five films' worth of drama, crises and revelations into one, and often lapses into sitcom triteness.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The film gets off to a slow start and runs long, but Gold and Helfand effectively stake out their own piece of a large and complicated issue.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Though rooted in broad stereotypes and sassy platitudes, the film's feisty cast and generally sunny outlook make for warm and reassuring comfort viewing, the equivalent of a straight-from-the-box dish of mac and cheese.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Biopic cliches hamstring producer-star Jennifer Lopez's pet project.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Equal parts "Mad Max" and "Day of the Dead," this third and supposedly final entry in the Resident Evil franchise is no less derivative than its predecessors but moves along at a brisk clip.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    A painfully slow psychological thriller.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    McCormack and Cochrane can't transcend the clichéd, meandering dialogue, so Brad and Lexi's dilemma never feels like anything but a didactic contrivance.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Newcomer Gregory never captures the mercurial charisma for which Jones was famous (and which Jagger notoriously channeled in his movie debut, "Performance"), without which his story is just another cautionary tale about fast times, intemperate passions and bad dope.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Thank goodness for Pfeiffer's Lamia, a harridan who's lived long enough to get the face she deserves and will do anything to hide it. She's a wicked delight.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    LaPaglia and Davis deliver top-notch performances that go a long way toward offsetting the material's didacticism.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This DIY oddity is both quirkily funny and strangely poignant, and does justice to the same themes that underlie the far more lavishly produced "A.I.: Artificial Intelligence."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Actress-turned-writer/director Asia Argento's angry, outspoken, semi-autobiographical rant of a film is strident and occasionally juvenile, but it packs an undeniable wallop.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Would be as tedious as a home movie if the couple, Edward DeBonis and Vincent Maniscalco, weren't gay men and their nuptials not colored by the clash between their personal faith and their rejection by the mainstream church.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The cast, a mix of beauty-contest winners, models, veteran actors and newcomers, is as diverse as the characters they play and work together surprisingly smoothly.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Rather than rage, Peosay's film radiates sadness over a singular way of life in danger of imminent obliteration.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The film is never dull -- no mean feat, given that it spends two hours telling a story whose end is widely known -- and features performances that range from coarsely effective to phenomenal.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Though ultimately the film is all smoke and mirrors, the sensibility it reflects is rich and exciting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This loving parody is steeped in comic book trivia and lore: The more you know, the more heartfelt your response to the film is likely to be.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It unfolds in the angst-haunted shadow of the 9'11 terror attacks and teeters on a thin edge of sheer panic.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Anonymously titled and packaged like a vulgar teen sex comedy, this candy-colored trifle is so precious it nearly floats away on a cloud of fairy dust.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It's a frequently funny diversion that doesn't have a mean-spirited bone in its body.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Driven equally by big questions and the abiding desire for small pleasures, like a decent cup of tea, it's an eccentric, mind-bending head trip that greets every catastrophe with an endearingly goofy smile that embodies Hitchhiker's Guide's Zen mantra: Don't Panic!
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's a trifle, but a beautifully crafted one.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Neither cheerfully naughty nor suffused with gauzy prurience, it evokes a time of turbulent (and often ugly) emotions with disquieting intensity.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Like the fresh-faced leads, the film is an unexpected charmer.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    An amateur in the best sense of the word, Dobson is an engaging ambassador for a life of the mind lived firmly in the real world.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    So crammed with plot twists that it's hard to follow, simultaneously ludicrous, sappy and casually dismissive of all the things Hollywood holds dear.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Thoroughly old-fashioned entertainment.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The movie is at its best when it's most straightforward. Flights of fancy like the child angel perched on Melvin's ceiling or his conversations with the black-clad Sweetback, who appears to undermine his confidence at crucial junctures, seem forced and pointless.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Screenwriter Matthew Tabak's directing debut is carefully plotted, well acted and surprisingly free of cheap thrills.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Making such a tragedy the backdrop to a love story risks trivializing it, though Chouraqui no doubt intended the film to affirm love's power to help people endure almost unimaginable horror.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The unspoken question that underlies their struggles is whether a facility run by sheer force of personality can survive when that personality is gone; the film ends on a cautiously hopeful note.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    A candy-colored, superficially fizzy revenge fantasy with a startlingly corrosive undercurrent of bitterness and frustration.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    A disturbing examination of what appears to be the definition of a "bad" police shooting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The success of this effect, which helps elevate the movie above a classy disease-of-the-week saga, rests firmly on Russell Crowe's performance, and it's a strikingly good and moving one.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It's a sly, subtle portrait of systematic hypocrisy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Paxton is impressively subtle and elicits remarkable performances from O'Leary and Sumpter.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    While the film's exploration of Irish religious intolerance takes it to many familiar areas, the specifics are unfamiliar and fine performances -- especially those of leads Cunningham and Brady.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    While Costner the actor clearly imagines himself the Gary Cooper of the 21st century, he's got a crude sentimental streak that Costner the director fails to curtail.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Combined with the Mamet-lite dialogue, a medley of all-too-deliberate pauses, smug literary allusions and calculatedly careless repetitions of the word "thingie" that obscure the meaning hidden in supposedly meaningless prattle, the result is a chic, vitriolic polemic that's as irritating as it means to be provocative.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Extravagant special effects notwithstanding, this is really a triumph of casting: The aplomb with which Jones plays wry straight man to Smith's street-smart wiseacre is terrifically enjoyable.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The result is sometimes strained, but often fresh and funny. And the sequence in which the entire cast sings "Avenues and Alleyways," bombastic '70s crooner Tony Christie's lush ode to thug life, is worth the price of admission in itself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Despite its leisurely pace, this unpretentious, character-driven picture is a low-key charmer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It's all about the amazing look, cobbled together from an astonishingly evocative range of sources: "Nosferatu" and "Mad Love," "Brazil" and "Metropolis," a haunted mosaic of bits and pieces of movie memories.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The soundtrack, which relies heavily on melancholy Sinatra standards like "The Good Life," "This Town" and "Summer Wind," casts perfectly modulated warning shadows over the film's light, bright look.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The action is confined to a single set and atmosphere is appropriately claustrophobic, but the image quality is harsh and flat. This accentuates the oppressive meanness of Vince's hotel room, but makes for some unpleasant viewing.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Do director Bryan Singer and screenwriter Brandon Boyce really mean to suggest that the roots of genocide lie in homosexual desire?
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This slight slice of L.A. life is distinguished by two fine, subtle performances. Redgrave is quietly heartbreaking-- Penn accomplishes the daunting task of revealing the spine beneath Melanie's sweet-natured tolerance of her perpetually disagreeable husband.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Melodramatic look at alienated California high school students.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Frankenheimer pretty much ignores everything that's happened in the action and thriller genres since 1975, and mostly that's a good thing.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Nolan's intention was clearly to cast the material in a more conventional Hollywood mold without turning it into namby-pamby nonsense, and he succeeds admirably.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    No matter how you spin Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky's chronicle of headbangers on the couch, it sounds like a pitch-perfect parody in "Beyond Spinal Tap" mode. If anything, knowing it's no joke makes it harder not to giggle.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Spare, sleek and coolly entertaining, even if there's less to this game of true lies than meets the eye.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Overall, the film feels a little stiff, perhaps because screenwriter Steven Peros adapted his own stage play. But the performances are a delight, especially Dunst's effervescent turn as Marion Davies.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This melodramatic action opera is a lurid love letter to the guns and poses aesthetic of Hong Kong action cinema.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Allows the supporting cast to steal the movie.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Censorship, madness, social rebellion and the power of art.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The sequel-ready twist at the end is a letdown, but until then this is a neatly constructed nail-biter.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This is solid entertainment, and the time Caviezel and Pearce spent training for their sword fights pays off handsomely.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's dispassionate examination of the shifts in Susan and Daniel's relationship as they drift from irritation to barely suppressed panic is at least as nerve wracking.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Precociously glib and never less than engaging.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    F. Scott Fitzgerald was wrong: there are second acts in American lives. But all too many of them are sad, sordid or both, as this fact-based story of sex, drugs and murder featuring adult-movie superstar John Holmes aptly demonstrates.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Cynics may scoff, but the spirit of Woodstock -- not the 1999 debacle, but the 1969 original -- lives.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The melancholy joke - if you can call it that - is that the pall of global mediocrity has erased national differences and turned women like Tamiko and Amanda into ghosts drifting through their own lives.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Yes, the story is pure formula, though given less twinkle and lip gloss than Hollywood would have brought to bear on it; the film is so remake-friendly you can cast it in your head.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Sweet-natured charmer in its own right.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    D.A. Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus's record of the event is an invaluable document, its technical limitations notwithstanding.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The story is simple enough for young children to follow, and the computer-animated images are both bright and surprisingly complex. Adults won't find the action heart-stopping.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Yash Chopra's thinly veiled plea for reconciliation between India and Pakistan is cloaked in a decades-spanning Romeo-and-Juliet romance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Brisk, glossy and gloriously art-directed, Scorsese's lavish biopic is a pop trifle, engaging but not compelling.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Dense collage of digitally altered images often looks shockingly like some super-hip media agency's show reel.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    A sleazy, seamy, flashy, steamy, vulgar exploitation thriller that revels in every minute of its own trashiness and delivers some pretty solid -- if prurient -- entertainment before strangling in a one-twist-too-many ending.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This lushly produced, lightweight romance embraces every cliche of the genre without so much as an ironic shrug.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Though Bittner's slacker charm may not be to all tastes, the parrots are natural-born scene-stealers with more than enough charm to seduce the most dubious viewer.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    There's very little plot, and director Mangold's attempts to make a connection between the social confusion of the '60s and Susanna's inner turmoil don't really work.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Their subtle, complex performances could put far more experienced and better-known actors to shame.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    An honorable film, beautifully acted, refreshingly un-camp in its take on wide lapels and progressive rock and occasionally coolly moving. It's just that ultimately, there's less here than meets the eye.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    By turns profane, vulgar, unpredictable, scabrous and perpetually somewhere between buzzed and three sheets to the wind, Bukowski opened a window onto a fringe world of blue-collar drudgery and alcoholic self-obliteration with his blistering, bleakly comic dispatches from the gutter.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    A blockbuster hit in Korea, Park's feature debut is a beguiling mix of the generic and the unfamiliar, and it ends on a shot that's nothing short of heartbreaking.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Director Sturla Gunnarsson crams each sequence with subtle, telling detail while avoiding "exotic India" clichés.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Mark Moormann's documentary tends to the worshipful, but Dowd, a charmer onscreen, was by all accounts just as appealing in real life.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Beneath the plot's romantic turns lies a surprisingly complex examination of the personal and professional price of honesty; falsehoods, half-truths, little white lies and self-delusion spur most of the key plot developments, and Roos never resorts to platitudes to account for their effects.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The film should be required viewing for all aspiring filmmakers, but the story's road-accident appeal is universal.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The giddy, "anything could happen" sense that made "Pulp Fiction" and "Reservoir Dogs" so viscerally exciting is missing here. But Tarantino's first picture in nearly three years is a faithful adaptation of Elmore Leonard's "Rum Punch," and its melancholy edge is a wistful delight.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Piper Perabo is a revelation -- and Barton is maturing into a sensitive, subtle performer with a marvelously expressive face.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Curl your cynical lip if you want, but there's a place for heartwarming, life-affirming, even weepy dramas, and Robert Redford brings the best-selling novel about a traumatized teen and her wounded horse to the screen with dignity and restraint.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    In the end, the film feels a little futile; its relentless, one-miserable-note tone is numbing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This minimalist meditation on loneliness and loss is so spare and drained of color that it seems always on the verge of fading into invisibility.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It's a raw, haunting experience.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The film deploys its disparate elements smartly, and director Hirotsugu Kawasaki can stage an action sequence with the best of them.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The multitalented Jaoui and Bacri excel on every level; her direction is efficient and unobtrusive, their script dissects the nuances of corruption by celebrity with a razor-sharp scalpel, and they deliver a pair of subtly unsparing performances.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's elliptical character development sometimes renders the actors' work opaque; restraint is an underpracticed virtue, but even it can be taken to excess.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This underrrated shocker has developed a cult following since its scattershot 1973 release, but deserves a wider one.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The result is sheer, unadulterated nastiness with no apologies.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Banderas inhabits the role of the mariachi with a feral grace undimished by the seven-year gap between films.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Kidman accomplishes a remarkable feat of transformation, adopting not only an accent, but a slightly seedy, faintly feral demeanor that almost makes you forget her icy good looks and fashion model's figure.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Nasty fun all around.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The story is less a sustained narrative than a series of scenes. But personal dynamics are the main event, and McDormand's powerhouse performance alone compensates for many minor deficiencies.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Viewers are left to draw their own conclusions, which inevitably will be colored by individual reactions to unabashed frontal nudity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This psychological thriller takes its time and never delivers the big shocks genre fans raised on its American cousins have come to expect. But it works up a chilly atmosphere of creeping dread, and the tension.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Director Nancy Savoca's no-frills record of a show forged in still-raw emotions captures the unsettled tenor of that post 9-11 period far better than a more measured or polished production ever could.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Affectionate, melancholy and anchored by a well thought-out performance from Sean Penn.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The payoff doesn't quite equal the intensity of the spectacularly squirm-inducing premise, but Farrell takes his showboating star turn and runs with it.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    A fresh and spirited fairy tale.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The story is predictable, but Reeder's performance is painfully convincing and the East Village locations so uniformly grimy that they all but weep despair.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Without the top-notch cast it would be indistinguishable from hundreds of pedestrian serial-killer pictures that clog video store shelves.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    What could easily have been a sentimental, fannish exercise in musty nostalgia is in fact a lovely tribute to an era of feverish creativity that seemed as though it would never end yet now lives only in memory.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Despite its floating narrative, this is a remarkably accessible and haunting film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    AKA
    Subtle performances and the "you are there" immediacy conferred by digital video give Roy's film the feel of a series of stolen moments.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The movie's performances, especially Lathan's, are strong enough to balance out the sometimes-clichéd script.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It would be hard to mount a straight-faced defense of Brisseau's feverish moral tale, complete with a lurking angel of death, but the carnal machinations are hugely entertaining -- particularly if you like your skin with a bracing sermon chaser.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Capably directed by Betty Thomas, this freewheeling pseudodocumentary tribute to Stern's juvenile antics paints the anarchic radio idol as Everyschmo made good.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    No voice is more vivid than that of the writer of O, who died in 2002.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This rather obvious parable about soul mates benefits from luminous B&W cinematography, Paradis and Auteuil's luminous performances and the picturesque carny atmosphere.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This small-scale film isn't for all tastes. But veterans of the dating wars will smirk uneasily at the film's nightmare versions of everyday sex-in-the-city misadventures.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The creepy set pieces are repetitive and the payoff is rather unsatisfying, even though the prophecies do eventually pan out.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Sad, leisurely road picture.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Newcomer Grace seems born to the part of an unformed young woman whose character cries out to be shaped, but it's Ivey's unobtrusive skill that shapes their onscreen relationship into something thoroughly convincing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Vividly photographed in shimmering colors and driven by a propulsive score.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Lavishly costumed and shot largely on location, the film benefits from a phenomenal central performance by Lopez de Ayala.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Clever though the premise is, the film's real strength is the smooth banter between Sam and Devon; it's never less than smart, often startlingly perceptive and always thoroughly convincing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Lightweight, thoroughly charming fluff.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Davis' tough, man-of-the-people narration is often annoying, but his words can't diminish the power of his story.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The first two thirds of the screenplay by Aja and cowriter Gregory Levasseur is a relentless exercise in bare-bones nastiness.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The plot's preposterous and Affleck is way too callow for a role that would have fit Robert Mitchum like a second-hand suit.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Features generally crisp dialogue, solid performances by a mix of newcomers and familiar character actors, and Provenzano's direction is strikingly accomplished.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Is this sophisticated humor? No. But it is pretty entertaining.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It's a cut above the throng of mindless, purported thrillers in which explosions and gun battles replace even rudimentary story telling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Berlevag's 1300 inhabitants are by nature hardy and uncomplaining, but Knut Erik Jensen's unhurried documentary reveals that there's more to them than mere stoicism.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It lacks "Fingers" searing, explosive vitality.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Though clearly shot on a shoestring, it's handsome, tightly written and generally well acted.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Shimizu generates a sense of palpable dread in each segment, expertly manipulating tried-and-true scare tactics supplemented by a truly inspired use of spooky sound effects.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The movie isn't "Blade Runner," but it's got some provocative ideas about the implications of cloning in a market-driven, capitalist society.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The interactions between the raspy-voiced Hurt and various shallowly cheerful Americans are genuinely charming and dynamic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Ratnam, known for integrating controversial cultural and political themes into popular melodramas, bundles a multitude of coming-of-age traumas into the kind of juicy, overwrought narrative that was once a Hollywood staple.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Balaban and Nairn are radiant, with none of the mannerisms that so often make Hollywood actresses look like Stepford teens.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    A delicate watercolor dream of a ghost story, as insubstantial and tremulously haunting as an unquiet spirit.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Based on a short story by Joe R. Lansdale, this low-key oddity stresses character over broad laughs and shock effects, allowing Campbell and Davis to develop a quirky rapport that's a real pleasure to watch.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Neither a conventional documentary nor a work of complete fiction, Hammer's film constructs a secret history, part imagination and part reality that is both revealing and slyly entertaining.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    An astonishing act of synthesis, bringing together disparate Ripper theories and a fiercely idiosyncratic version of London's history, architecture, policing and social structure.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Apparently intended as a larky, character-driven adventure with dark underpinnings, this attenuated road movie was originally envisioned as a vehicle for relative unknowns, and might have worked better that way.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This efficient fright machine features a knowing cameo by Curtis's mom -- "Psycho's" Janet Leigh -- a couple of bloody good scares and a genuinely affecting performance from Curtis.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Winslet and Keitel are perfectly matched, go-for-broke actors handed dramatic license to do a psychic striptease.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    A military satire in the tradition of M*A*S*H and Catch-22, based on Peruvian novelist Mario Vargas Llosa's 1973 book.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    More comic book-like and less intriguing than the original, the film's punch-drunk cyber-mysticism still has a darkly seductive allure that sets it apart from juvenile, Star Wars-style space opera.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Bojanov's sad subjects could as easily be in Detroit or Glasgow or Marseilles. What keeps his film from being a relentless wallow in wasted lives is its surprising conclusion.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Quite enjoyable on its own terms.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    On the downside, it's slackly edited -- comedy is, after all, all about timing and there are way too many lengthy shots of Cho waiting for her audience to respond.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This quietly gripping film is both universal and particular.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Merits watching if only because it's a bracing corrective to the deeply entrenched image of Europe's Jews plodding, sheep-like, to their deaths in Nazi concentration camps.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Dialogue is kept to a bare minimum, but the film's complex underlying sound mix -- a subtle symphony of faintly heard voices and the muted sounds of cars -- adds a haunting texture to what could have been the slightest of stories about a woman's ephemeral victory over emotional numbness.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It's vulgar, to be sure, but it's also brash and invigorating.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It's sweet-natured, soothing and there's a behind-the-scenes/blooper reel at the end that will reassure anyone worried about the animals' treatment during filming.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    That director and co-writer Gurinder Chadha transforms this sitcom material into a lively and charming film about the melting pot at full boil probably owes something to the fact that her own multicultural bona fides are firmly in order.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It should come as no surprise that there's an American remake in the works, starring Leonardo DiCaprio and Matt Damon and directed by Martin Scorsese.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Richly atmospheric but a little thin in the character department: It feels oddly truncated, despite nicely textured performances.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The material is inherently compelling and anchored by Washington's performance.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Resembles the giggly teen romances that saturate the Japanese market with a coolly alienated French twist.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Slight and whimsical.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    A pitch-perfect parody of poverty row horror/sci-fi pictures of the 1950s, Larry Blamire's meticulous takeoff could easily be taken for the real thing, which is both its genius and its Achilles heel.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    A vivid telling of a familiar story -- the rise and fall of a street criminal -- bolstered by exceptional performances and a clear-eyed take on the economics of dealing and the pathology of ghetto fabulousness.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Slight but affecting.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Solidly entertaining and surprisingly free of the Mamet-isms that can suck the life right out of the most tightly crafted story.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It's enjoyable poppycock.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The cast — a felicitous blend of character actors and up-and-comers — work together like a street-smart machine, and Hoffman's scummy turn as porn-peddler and all-around creep King is a reminder of just how sleazily funny he can be.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The performances are uniformly excellent.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    It's straightforwardly entertaining and a genuine nail-biter.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Picking up some 10 years after the previous film left off, this stripped-down, intelligently conceived follow-up is a respectable conclusion to the Terminator trilogy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    If his ambitious first feature isn't entirely successful, it nevertheless poses genuinely provocative questions and opens a window into the way the 9/11 disaster looks from outside the U.S.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Be warned: the silly songs are damnably catchy, from Gerrit's ode to the seventeen pigeons he keeps on the roof, which he sings while sporting a very tight set of white undergarments, to the rousing "Ja Zuster, Nee Zuster."
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This is a film worth seeing, and LaBute is a filmmaker well worth watching.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Michael Meeropol provides a far more eloquent statement of the song's enduring impact: "Until the last racist is dead, 'Strange Fruit' is relevant."
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    You don't have to be Jewish to love Jonathan Kesselman's uneven, profane and occasionally flat-out hilarious parody of vintage blaxploitation pictures, but it helps.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The look is utterly faithful to Tezuka's aesthetic -- he loved classic Disney animation, especially "Bambi" (1942) -- but it's hard to empathize with the angst of a character who looks like a Super Mario Brother.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This anti-thriller radiates dread rather than suspense; it delivers creeping apprehension rather than adrenaline-pumping kicks, and the uniformly strong and finely calibrated performances more than compensate for the absence of technical razzle-dazzle.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Writer-director Pan Nalin's film is at its best when he focuses on the meticulous, hands-on preparation of herb- and mineral-based drugs; it's also genuinely provocative to hear Ayurvedists argue that healing should be a vocation rather than a career.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    A fairly serious psychodrama rendered in cartoon images.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Cinematographer Ken Kelsch, Ferrara's frequent collaborator, picks up the theme of overlapping lives by layering images within scenes -- the ongoing interplay of reflections and shadows is breathtaking -- and through slow, shimmering dissolves.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Brassy and energetic, first-time director Mars Callahan's vividly photographed ode to the seductive allure of professional sharking succeeds in making the game seem genuinely kinetic and thrilling.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    This wry, low-key comedy, crafted by members of the sketch-comedy group The State, swims defiantly against the stream of contemporary comedy, eschewing bodily-function jokes and obvious gags in favor of laughs so sly and self-effacing you could almost overlook them.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    The harder you try to follow the narrative the more frustrating the film becomes, but its sleekly menacing images work their way into your brain like slivers of dry ice.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    An uneasy mix of B-movie scares.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    What distinguishes Cordero's film is his use of location.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    Though filmmaker Nina Gilden Seavy followed Bering Strait for the better part of two years, their story is in no way over at the film's conclusion.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Maitland McDonagh
    McKenzie's mercurial performance is the centerpiece of this sad, surprisingly absorbing story.

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