Maitland McDonagh

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For 2,233 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 43% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Maitland McDonagh's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 55
Highest review score: 100 Devil in a Blue Dress
Lowest review score: 0 The Hottie & the Nottie
Score distribution:
2233 movie reviews
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's strident tone also serves to undermine its generally above-average performances.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The narrative is cluttered with backstory, and the endless digressions overwhelm the efforts of a generally strong cast.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Barber's screenplay is mired in cliches that got old in 1935.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    LOL
    Scruffy, loosely structured and piercingly perceptive about the ways in which technology that supposedly brings people together actually keeps them apart.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's depiction of life among the salt of the earth is blandly cartoonish; and the "Super Sounds of the '70s" soundtrack meticulously matches songs to action, as though the filmmakers didn't trust viewers to figure out what these one-note characters were feeling.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Who knew the rock 'n' roll life could be so mild?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Packs five films' worth of drama, crises and revelations into one, and often lapses into sitcom triteness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Veterans Danner and Wilkinson effortlessly make Anna and Stephen more interesting than all the youngsters combined.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While the aerial dogfights are handsome and apparently historically accurate, right down to the tracer bullets that leave graceful, crisscrossing trails in the clouds, they have a video-game feel.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Director Stephen Purvis and writer Chris Haddock never rise above the material's inherent pulpiness, but they keep the twists coming until the very end.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Produced by the son of Trinity Broadcasting Network founder Paul Crouch, this historical epic offers a solid two hours of spectacle and intrigue drawn from The Book of Esther by way of Tommy Tenney and Mark Andrew Olsen's novel "Hadassah."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    There are no laughs to be had here, though, unless you count nervous titters and frat-boy sniggers at the very thought of, you know.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    An improvement over the tedious "Saw II" (2005), this second sequel to the surprise 2004 hit still features the series' trademark gruesome "games" but shifts the focus to the relationships among the characters.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's an entertaining diversion whose clever structure gives pulp-crime cliches a welcome twist.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    This is not a film for neophytes: It proceeds from the assumption that the viewer is familiar with the events and people of Jesus' life, and is probably right in doing so: Its intended audience is seriously Christian.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Ultimately, Tenacious D is a sight gag -- two unprepossessing, chunky dudes rocking out like wiry guitar gods -- supplemented by spot-on digs at the macho bombast and Dungeons & Dragons silliness that drives heavy-metal mania.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Slow, solemn going, despite its best efforts at thundering soldiers and comic-relief kings.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    LaPaglia and Davis deliver top-notch performances that go a long way toward offsetting the material's didacticism.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Edward Zwick brings unimpeachable good intentions to his film about the bloody underbelly of the international diamond trade, but when social conscience jockeys for attention with movie-star glamour, glamour always wins. The result is a rip-snorting adventure set against the backdrop of African misery.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    But for all the profane language and sexual frankness, Soderbergh's film is no more cynical or world-weary than its inspirations, and in the end, it feels like a clever trick wrapped around a hollow center.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    There isn't an original moment in the mix, but it's not as crass or vulgar as much of what passes for "family friendly" entertainment, and it keeps the precocious pop-culture references to a blessed minimum.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The story is complex enough to be absorbing, but its pedantic quality makes it -- and its lessons -- all too easy to forget.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Philippe Diaz's controversial documentary about the legacy of the brutal 1991-2002 civil war in Sierra Leone -- widely considered the poorest country in the world, despite its rich mineral resources -- suggests that the rebel faction RUF (Revolutionary United Front of Sierra Leone) was not alone in terrorizing civilians and committing atrocities, most famously the amputation of limbs with machetes.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The acting is flat, and the scientist's ideological speeches too bluntly designed to mirror post-9/11 rhetoric. But there's a dreamy fascination to the iconic images of machines fighting a perpetual war for the human creators they'll inevitably outlast.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Endearing without being especially engaging.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The film, though admirably ambitious, is resolutely earthbound, mired in ick and slime and never more wooden than in the delirious climax.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Formulaic though it is, the story hits the right emotional buttons and promises that hope and dogged work trump despair.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While Canadian writer-director Eric Nicholas has no fresh thoughts about the voyeuristic nature of movie going, he knows enough to make sure when high-tech peeper Doug (Colin Hanks, son of Tom) conceals his camera in a bag, its lens pokes out of the zipper like the big, fat metaphor it is.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The film's pared-down narrative is anything but aimless, and it pays off in a haunting final last scene scored with Gang of Four's "Damaged Goods."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Television director David Von Ancken's metaphorical revenge Western wears its influences on its sleeve, but adds nothing to the genre that hasn't already been explored in the quietly demythologizing films of Anthony Mann and Budd Boetticher, the baroque, operatic Italian Westerns of Sergio Leone and his less-familiar peers, and even in Sam Fuller's deranged, post-Civil War psychodrama "Run of the Arrow"(1956).
    • 36 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Just when the film seems to be getting bogged down in "before I made it big" anecdotes -- around the time she and Andy Dick, who was once dismissed from a food-service gig, spend a day operating a mobile lunch stand -- Gurwitch wisely broadens her focus, interviewing ordinary victims of corporate "right-sizing," plant closings.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While Kudlacek lets some of the elder statesmen ramble, their recollections are a vivid, firsthand window into a bygone era of American art.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Malkovich pulls out all the gaudy stops.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Fergus' thriller benefits from Pearce's high-strung performance and the stark New Mexico landscapes, but the story is familiar and the pacing much too measured for a slight tale of ineluctable fate.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's a show we don't see, presumably because of issues with music rights, and while "much ado about nothing" might be overstating things, after more than an hour and a half of buildup, it would have been nice to see Wu-Tang perform.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Does so many things right that it's a shame to see it sink into horror-movie cliches.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While Travolta and Gandolfini have the beefy, closed-off look of post-WWII era cops, they never FEEL: They look like actors playing dress up. Leto overcomes his delicate good looks to embody Fernandez's feral, faintly exotic charm, but Hayek is a standard-issue femme fatale, damaged on the inside but flawless on the surface.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Little Acuna -- who looks even younger than 11 -- gives a sweetly unaffected performance as the beleaguered child.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Shelly was murdered before she could continue developing as a writer and director, and while this, her last film, is extremely uneven and undermined by an excess of quirk, Keri Russell's performance as a pregnant pie-guru is a charmer with a bracing streak convincingly desperate determination.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The mix of rollicking, family-friendly action and backwoods mysticism is odd, as is the story's progress from larky escapades to increasingly grim consequences, and Craven never quite manages to make it all seem a smoothly integrated piece.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The "cute" kids are insufferable, but leads Ali Khan and Mukerji radiate the unabashed star quality that's all but gone from American movies -- poverty and desperation haven't looked so glamorous since the glory days of Joan Crawford.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Grabsky's meticulous and frequently monotonous documentary about the life and music of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart comes to vivid life whenever one of the many world-class musicians who sat for interviews simultaneously describes and demonstrates exactly what's so special about particular compositions.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Though rooted in broad stereotypes and sassy platitudes, the film's feisty cast and generally sunny outlook make for warm and reassuring comfort viewing, the equivalent of a straight-from-the-box dish of mac and cheese.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The younger actors bring varying degrees of experience to bear on their roles, but all capture the desperation beneath their characters' tough fronts, while the NYC locations are suitably depressing.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Baldwin dominates the screen with his slick, beefy swagger, and if Prinze is less than convincing as a kid from Brooklyn, Caan and Ferrara nail Carmine and Bobby with such assured economy that it hardly matters they're one-note roles.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The result is a little bit nutty and pretty entertaining in a thoroughly unconvincing way. And watch out for that 11th-hour twist -- it's a head snapper.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Cynical, misanthropic and embittered.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's almost three hours long, and that's a lot of time to invest in what is, essentially, a theme-park attraction you can't ride.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Amu
    Compelling on a personal level.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    There's always been a wide streak of the tediously naughty little boy in Besson, and all the seductively stylized images in the world can't hide it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The New Jersey locations and soundtrack help ground the story in a particular time and place, and Schroeder delivers a terrific performance.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    With its attractive cast, beguiling score and relatively straightforward narrative, this dark fable of letters and lust is one of Greenaway's most accessible works.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Danish writer-director Ole Bornedal delivers up a stylish thriller whose murky, shot-through-pond-scum cinematography is its most distinctive feature.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    For all its impeccable indie credibility, writer-director Zoe Cassavetes' bittersweet romance is little more than a hipster chick flick in which the same old smart women make the usual foolish choices.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The key to enjoying the fourth installment in this testosterone-fueled franchise is accepting that it's a live-action cartoon that makes no effort to conform to the laws of gravity, plausibility or common sense.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Wongpim pays tribute to classic Italian Westerns in his face-hugging close-ups, but his film is more silly than existentially anarchic, and its exotic quirkiness wears thin quickly.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    A painfully slow psychological thriller.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    This fifth film should please fans who rate the films based on their fidelity to the canonical texts. But for the uninitiated, it's a dry and slightly dreary introduction to the world of Hogwarts and Azkaban.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Sweet-natured, formulaic and ripe for an American remake.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    In the end, sharp writing and terrific performances can't compensate for the fact that the back-and-forth between a sour scribe and a manipulative celebrity doesn't amount to a hill of beans in this crazy world.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Anime enthusiasts will want to take a look, but the film is too uneven to serve as a good introduction to the form.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Jane Austen deserves better than to be subordinated to her own creation, the spirited Lizzy Bennet.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Biopic cliches hamstring producer-star Jennifer Lopez's pet project.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While it doesn't miss a cliche, it also invests every one with vigorous conviction.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Thank goodness for Pfeiffer's Lamia, a harridan who's lived long enough to get the face she deserves and will do anything to hide it. She's a wicked delight.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While far from the cream of the mockumentary crop, it's still a pleasant diversion.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Lurie's film never fully reconciles the story about newsroom ethics with the sentimental drama about bad dads and bereft sons.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    McCormack and Cochrane can't transcend the clichéd, meandering dialogue, so Brad and Lexi's dilemma never feels like anything but a didactic contrivance.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The payoff fizzles, but the buildup is intriguing until it topples under its own weight.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Based on the story of Milarepa (1043 - 1123), who renounced the violence and vengeance of his early life to become a revered Tibetan Buddhist saint, lama Neten Chokling's directing debut ends on a frustrating spiritual cliffhanger.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    And yes, that is Salma Hayek in the chorus line of sexily sinister nurses, perhaps repaying Taymor for lending her dramatic credibility with "Frida."
    • 33 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Frankly, it's dumb, but no dumber than "Transformers."
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Equal parts "Mad Max" and "Day of the Dead," this third and supposedly final entry in the Resident Evil franchise is no less derivative than its predecessors but moves along at a brisk clip.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The story's incredible coincidences, lazy cynicism and easy ironies recast a real-life horror story as easy-to-dismiss melodrama, complete with sequential "happy" endings.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It feels as though everyone involved was having a rollicking good time, and while the film itself is wildly uneven, Lin and company get in a few pointed jabs at Hollywood fatuousness and self-delusion, cultural stereotypes and '70s fashions.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Light and sweet, comfort food dressed up with a dash of exotic spice.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Mark Boone Jr. makes a vivid impression as eccentric loner Beau Brower, and Danny Huston is mesmerizing as the leader of the shrieking, slashing, wallowing-in-gore bloodsuckers. They effortlessly eclipse the rest of the cast.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's hard to watch two fine actors working themselves into a lather for so little reward.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The minutiae of Carter's book tour isn't always enthralling, but his personality drives the film: pious, stubborn, devoted to his wife, curious, professional, warm and yet slightly removed from the fray, conciliatory, meticulous, self-effacing, funny, decent, intellectually rigorous and firmly committed to his positions.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Often rings painfully true, but would have benefited from judicious editing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    This candy-colored animated fable is an awkward mix of corny bee puns, clever sight gags, kid-friendly action, adult-centric workplace angst and Seinfeld's distinctive navel-gazing wit. And what's up with those four-legged bees?
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Barnes, now in his seventies and relocated by the Witness Protection Program, is shot only in silhouette, but there's plenty of footage of him in his heyday, dressed to the pimpalicious nines and playing to the cameras like a movie star.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Homey but not especially interesting trips down the Ellis and Cheney family lanes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The movie has a monster problem -- the more you see of them, the less scary they are -- most of the characters are standard-issue types, and Harden seriously overdoes the pious psycho bit.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The film gets off to a slow start and runs long, but Gold and Helfand effectively stake out their own piece of a large and complicated issue.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    This is pure big-budget formula filmmaking.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Polished but oddly lifeless heist thriller.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Beautifully encapsulates the film's sensibility, a bizarre mix of reverse cool and childishness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Though ultimately flawed, the film's depiction of velvet-gloved cruelty and matter-of-fact betrayal is surprisingly potent, and it's pure pleasure to watch Bacall prowling the corridors of power, tossing her golden mane and tossing off world-weary observations in a voice pitched somewhere between a purr and a growl.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Matheson's bitterly ironic ending -- which pivots on the nature of Neville's legend -- is gutted and turned into formulaic pap.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Surprisingly compelling, if not up to dealing with the larger political issues it raises.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    When Cox is performing, the movie is firing on all cylinders.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The result is the farthest thing from a bland, spineless sequel: It's a brutal, insanely excessive successor to grindhouse pictures of yore.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Formulaic but well-acted variation on the theme of pursuing your dreams through dance.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    For parents who were unable to secure tickets for the young fans in their households, it's nothing short of a godsend.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Thoroughly heartfelt. But though Trachtman alludes to the impact that Lior's special needs and local fame has had on his family, she seems uninterested in exploring the larger history of beliefs and traditions concerning mentally challenged people and their closeness to God.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    This ambitious independent feature eschews gore in favor of rubber-reality ambiguity.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's a terrific showcase for battling Boleyn babes Scarlett Johansson and Natalie Portman.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Donnie Yen is famous for combining martial arts traditions into his own unique fighting style and Collin Chou, who studied with Sammo Hung, is up to the task of holding his own.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Katzir's documentary is as much a labor of love as Spaisman's theater, and it's often rough around the edges.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Stanford's script is painfully obvious, right down to the line of dialogue spelling out the title's significance.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    A snapshot rather than a sustained look at Meat Loaf's tumultuous life and career, Klein's film is a revealing glimpse at the late career of a performer who looked a safe bet to die before he got old, then surprised everyone by hanging on long enough to find fans who weren't born when he started out.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Seriously flawed and not for every taste, the film was shot quickly and on the cheap, and is driven by Argento's slurred, scratchy voice and Bette Davis eyes.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    21
    A predictable moral tale enacted by blandly pretty young things who bear little resemblance to the average brainiac.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The unfortunate fact is that it's more than a little dull when it isn't preposterous.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Could as easily be called "Spurlock: Cultural Learnings Of America for Make Benefit Glorious Nation Of America."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    On its own low-bar terms, it delivers the goods: pole-dancing, gut-chomping and Jenna J.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    What it lacks in objectivity, it makes up for in vivid intimacy.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Jackman and McGregor are a delight to watch.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    If only the wit weren't overwhelmed by lame jokes about body parts, functions and fluids.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    A perverse mixed-martial arts film in which talk trumps action.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Though neither subtle nor particularly original, Gens' spin on the meat-movie classic has both nightmarish energy to spare.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    B-movie stalwart Michael Madsen turns in a no-holds-barred, road-wreck performance in this nihilistic crime thriller, which plays out a variation on the old maxim that there's no honor among thieves -- even if they're cops.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    This scrappy, ultra-low budget comedy, made in 19 days for $70,000 by North Carolina School of the Arts graduates Jody Hill, Danny McBride and Ben Best, comes with its own Cinderella tale: It debuted at the 2006 Sundance Film Festival but failed to find distribution until comedian Will Ferrell and his business partner, Adam McKay, championed it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Sivan's film is well acted, beautifully photographed and oddly reassuring. It comes perilously close to suggesting that the injustices of colonial rule were the product of morally weak and misguided individuals rather than a system that empowered and enriched foreign interests at the expense of locals.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's a light, silly instantly forgettable comedy peppered with action set-pieces and affectionate nods to its fondly remembered predecessor, including a gracious end-credits dedication to the late Don Adams and Edward Platt.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The film is flat-out gorgeous and contains moments of sheer lunacy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Slick, stylish and super-violent, but also oddly dull.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    This dumbed-down spin on Jules Verne's classic adventure tale was devised as a kid-friendly roller-coaster ride, and it delivers the goods. Whether anyone over the age of eight wants the goods is another matter altogether.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    A cute, slight tale.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    While rich in ethnographic detail, the film ultimately recalls nothing more than pulp fictions like Robert E. Howard’s "Conan the Barbarian," which validate their worship of ubermensch-ian brawn by way of sad tales of childhood victimization.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Restrained and decorous to a fault.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's dramatically unsatisfying.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Mukherjee's charm keeps the child-like Geeta from being thoroughly annoying, and the musical numbers are pleasant, if not particularly memorable.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The Carter and Spotnitz's credit, such weighty concerns aren't the stuff of most mainstream genre movies. But they're also not sufficiently gripping to transform a middling thriller into something truly provocative or haunting.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    A risky, not entirely successful comedy about mental disability, based on the novel by Sherwood Kiraly.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Kilmer and Dorff, who was also an executive producer, immerse themselves in difficult roles.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    The sequel is something of a disappointment, embroiling its refreshingly level-headed heroines in a series of clichéd romantic dilemmas.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    There's a terrific movie buried in Woody Allen's tale of two American girls broadening their horizons in Barcelona, and every once in a while tantalizing glimpses penetrate the twee narration and mannered performances.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Cheerfully gross, deliberately retro horror picture pays tongue-in-cheek homage to the kind of genre movies Charles Band and Roger Corman's companies turned out in the 1980s.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Has a certain silly, kid-friendly charm.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Rios is the glue that holds Johannesson's neither-fish-nor-fowl film together.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    There's something disheartening about seeing real-life stories and their inevitable complexities put through the Hollywood sausage machine and transformed into bland parables about a privileged, wayward young bucks redeemed by wise, infinitely patient mentors and the self-abnegating spirit of team sports.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    It's earnest, well-intentioned and scrupulously even-handed, in the style of made-for-TV problem movies.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Maitland McDonagh
    Clearly a labor of love and a call to action, but it's undermined by the sheer volume of topics it tackles in addition to the main subject.

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