Manohla Dargis
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For 1,580 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Manohla Dargis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Gett: The Trial of Viviane Amsalem
Lowest review score: 0 Slackers
Score distribution:
1,580 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This is, after all, a film in which no one leads life according to script -- but, then, that's also the reason it works.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Too short by half, Lost Boys of Sudan affords frustratingly little by way of real analysis and history. But it does introduce us to two extraordinary young men whose faith in this country is almost as unbearably sad as their stories.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Hughes visual choices can feel borrowed and clichéd, but his regard for beauty often compensates for his blunders, as does the sturdy, reliable appeal of another story of good and evil, men and women, light and dark, glass and steel, sex and power. As it turns out, there are eight million and one stories in the naked city.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Brother is a solid return to gangster form for Kitano, who knows how to transcend the most overly familiar genre clichés without betraying the rules of engagement.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Blind Mountain is a reminder that art sometimes keeps the truth alive far better than the news.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Alternately hilarious and alarming documentary.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Sweet and slight and often charming coming-of-age tale.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    An icy-cool study of violence both mediated and horribly real.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Straight-up ridiculous, but it's also consistently funny and nicely played by a well-complemented cast that finds its collective groove and never misses a beat.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A pleasantly immersive, beautifully animated, occasionally sleepy tale.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Hawke serves as both the narrator and the story’s ballast amid all the woo-woo interludes and disruptions, the puzzle piece you hold and worry about even as the scenery changes and identities shift.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A fine and, on a scene-by-scene basis, often better than fine, if effectively unadventurous work.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The comedy in Alfie is plentiful but bittersweet, and the character's bad behavior pleases more than it repels, principally because the star Jude Law's beauty and easy charm go a long way to softening the edges.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Greatness hovers just outside American Gangster, knocking, angling to be let in.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The spirit of the law will be upheld (this being Hollywood), but only after everyone has had plenty of nasty fun (this being Hollywood).
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The limitations of Calvary are summed up by the insistent, dialectical chatter that almost mechanically pings and pongs between lightness and darkness, glibness and seriousness, insincerity and honesty, faithfulness and despair.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    For all his genre-hopping and shape-shifting Spielberg seems to have become too big to tell small stories, which is one reason why the film sputters on one too many false endings.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A fitfully funny comedy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Dizzily enjoyable documentary.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Absorbing if unsettling documentary.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Scene for scene, Serenity is more engaging and certainly better written and acted than any of Mr. Lucas's recent screen entertainments.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Although what ensues is generally unsurprising and as pro forma down-and-dirty as the genre dictates, it's also on occasion rather affecting.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's good, canny-dumb fun.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Allen's invocation of the "Thin Man" films in an interview makes sense, even if he’s no William Powell and Ms. Johansson is certainly no Myrna Loy. Scoop was made by someone who understands that what makes the "Thin Man" series enduring isn't whodunit and why, but the way Nick and Nora look at each other as they sip their martinis, Asta nipping at their heels.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's the brilliance of The X-Files to have turned Mulder's paranoid style into a function of cool. Mulder and Scully aren't just beautiful, smart, well-armed and seemingly impervious to the banalities of everyday life, such as cheap haircuts and ruinous love affairs--they're cool.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Loosely constructed, The World drifts along pleasantly for much of its two-and-a-half-hour running time. Mr. Jia has a terrific eye and an almost sculptural sense of film space (especially in close quarters), and he brings texture and density to even the most nondescript rooms.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Horny is as horny does in the sweetly absurd high school comedy Superbad.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The movie love can make it hard to hear the human pulse beneath the noise (it's there, if faint), much less see if there's anything new going on.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A competently made, moderately diverting variation on a genre standard.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Home is, as with so many family stories, also something of a disaster movie: the walls shudder and crack, and eventually so do the people inside them.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Has an appealing surface beauty, largely due to the talented cinematographer Virginie Saint Martin, and an equally shallow mystery.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Something wicked this way comes in the nifty horror film The Last Winter, crawling through the hallways and howling into the dread night.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There’s an elemental, almost primitive quality to the Tavianis’ condensing that, at its most effective, dovetails with the prison’s severely circumscribed material reality, as if the high walls, barred windows and suffocating rooms were manifestations of the characters’ states of mind.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Notes on Marie Menken shines a quavering if welcome ray of light on a largely forgotten figure in the American avant-garde film scene of the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    My guess is that after years of being the trick pony, he wanted to see what it was like to be the ringmaster.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A serious film filled with both great and awkward ideas and made as much from the heart as the head.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A sun-scorched noir, Rampart tells a familiar story with such visual punch and hustling energy that it comes close to feeling like a new kind of movie, though it's more just a tough gloss on American crime stories past.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's impossible not to cry at their suffering, but whether you'll feel anything is another story.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Glibly funny and eager to please.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The film, which [Mr. Maloof] directed with Charlie Siskel, is absorbing, touching and satisfyingly enjoyable because Maier was a fascinating, poignant and somewhat enigmatic woman.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    But while the Pietà imagery startles, it makes increasing sense as the story builds around it. Because as Hideaway deepens and evolves, you understand that the image of Mousse cradling Louis is a manifestation of her love: this was how she held him, with a tender love that in its depth was itself holy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The film demands engagement and a kind of surrender, a willingness to enter into a work shaped by correlation, metaphor and metonymy, by beautiful images and fragments of ideas, a work that locates the music in the twitching of a dog’s ears, in the curve of a woman’s belly, a child’s song and an adult’s reverie.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The results are about as naughty as that sounds (not very), but it also makes for a fairly giggling good time.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The joy of this unassuming, generous film is that it never sells out its characters' desires or ours.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This is, it’s worth remembering, a movie set in the American West that was shot in South Africa by a Danish director with a Danish star. In other words it’s another dream of America, feverish, lovely and absurd.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The film is more funny ha-ha than LOL; it’s a smarty-pants satire that mocks and embraces almost every cliché in the biography playbook.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Strangely entertaining.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Has a slamming first hour. As Ian Wilson's camera darts over Charles Lee's spookily atmospheric sets, enigmas sprout like mushrooms.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    What follows is a sensationally entertaining escalation of frights, the kind that make you wiggle and squirm as you alternately laugh at your own gullibility and marvel at the filmmaker's cunning and craft.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    An agreeable if slight, vaguely sketched character study times two.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Only ends up skimming the surface. But even the skimming is largely interesting and thought-provoking, and of course very bleak.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The French director Bertrand Tavernier deploys some smart ideas in this film, a period story about wars on the battlefield and those closer to home, but there's something a bit goatish in his attention to some female charms.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A rare bird indeed -- a disarming, appealingly modest discovery, beautifully shot, nicely performed. Perched on the knife's edge of absurdity, the story at once embraces the large questions (who is the enemy and why) and shrugs them off with a laugh.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    What keeps the movie from tipping into full-blown exploitation like "City of God," which turns third-world misery into art-house thrills, is Mr. Fukunaga's sincerity. What keeps you watching is his superb eye.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Kwanten, meanwhile, best known for playing the sweet, dim Jason Stackhouse on the HBO show "True Blood," gives Griff the delicate, ethereal affect of a man who's an alien in his own world except when he's running down an alley in a disguise. He's a pleasure to watch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A likable, lightly sticky valentine to childhood, the 1980s and the dawning of movie love, Son of Rambow was written and directed by Garth Jennings and produced by Nick Goldsmith, the duo behind the underappreciated fantasy "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The results are charming if rarely thrilling, with outstanding performances from Joan Allen and William H. Macy.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The French filmmaker Simone Bitton takes a measured look at the barrier in her documentary Wall, a film that considers hard-core political realities alongside agonizing personal truths.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    [Mr. Resler] turns out to be not only the heart of this particular game, but also its brains, lungs and unforgettably endearing mug.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Despite its A-movie aspirations, as the chases continue and the plot holes widen, Unknown quickly settles into the familiar B-movie comfort zone.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Rahimi opens up an entire world inside the couple’s modest house, filling its few rooms with enough air, sharp words and slow-boiling intrigue that the walls never feel as if they’re closing in on you.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Election is finally, necessarily, as much about sex as it is about politics -- wanting it, getting it, losing it.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A charming, uncritical, often entertaining jumble, the documentary was written and directed by Leslie Zemeckis.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The tussling between Elinor and Merida is familiar, but while the mother-daughter clashes may make the story "relatable," they drain it of its mythopoetic potential, turning what could have been a cool postmodern fairy tale into another family melodrama.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    For his atmospheric debut as a feature director, the actor Matt Dillon has cast himself as a guy in need of saving. It's a nice fit.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Grotesquely violent, horribly funny.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Matthiesen has a way of consistently and gently upending expectations, sometimes with humor.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Even as Ms. Amirpour draws heavily from various bodies of work with vampirelike hunger, she gives her influences new life by channeling them through other cultural forms, including her chador-cloaked vampire.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A delicately funny tale about everyday surrealism.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Better than the usual three-stage journey of courage, heartbreak and redemption. In this case, the triumph of the human spirit comes with a small bitter chaser.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Maggio's strengths here are his people (not their stories), a sense of intimacy and textured place rather than the generic hoops he forces the characters to jump through.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This maximalist approach can tax the nerves, though it has the benefit of keeping you on alert. It’s also pretty enjoyable. Mr. Fuqua, who happens to be surprisingly good with actors, does have a knack for chaos.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Moretz is by far the best thing about the film: she holds the screen as gracefully as she executes a running back flip.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    With its spy-on-spy globetrotting, old-fashioned villains, flirty but prematurely swinging minis and fan-boy bits (look for an eye-blink-fast tribute to "Basic Instinct" and a cameo from the cult actor Michael Ironside), the whole enterprise has an agreeable lightness, no small thing, given its rapidly moving parts.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Bruce Willis is ready to earn our love again by performing the same lovably violent, meathead tricks as before.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Central to the last film's success are Manise and Blanc, who invest the story with intensity unmatched since Belvaux stormed through the first feature.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Although there's more romance in "Buck," a classic American survivor story in the triumphant individual vein, in Pianomania the very dry, very accomplished Mr. Knüpfer makes engaging company both because he keeps enviable company and because he's a full-on geek, though one possessed by pianos.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Kormakur sets and keeps up a fast rather than frantic pace that never runs the movie off the rails even when the story nearly does.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It doesn’t aspire to art-house significance, just to white-knuckled entertainment.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Jayasundara studied film in France and has probably watched his share of classic European art cinema. Although his influences may originate closer to home (in interviews he has name dropped the venerated Sri Lankan auteur Lester James Peries), his use of landscape to convey states of mind suggests that he has more than a passing acquaintance with the work of Michelangelo Antonioni.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The irony is, it's his vulgarity, this mixture of the gaudy and the glossy, that distinguishes Lyne, that makes his work identifiable and, when the story's right, such a guilty pleasure.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Uplifting, disheartening, inspiring, enraging -- the mind reels while watching the documentary Pray the Devil Back to Hell, even as the eyes water, the temples pound and the body trembles.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    In Good Company lacks both the emotional sting and the bright pop-culture snap of "About a Boy," as well as Mr. Hornby's carefully cultivated irony, but it makes for an agreeable solo directing debut.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There’s not much new under the moon here, which makes what the writer and director Richard LaGravenese does with the story all the more notable.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Nannerl, the subject of at least three novels also titled "Mozart's Sister," is in this film meant to be something more than a chapter in her brother's biography though it's not exactly clear what. Somewhat frustratingly if reasonably, Mr. Féret never settles on whether she was a genius, a martyr, a feminist cause, a disappointed daughter, a resigned woman or all of the above.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Buoyed by Ms. Johansson’s presence, Mr. Besson keeps his entertainment machine purring. He may be a hack, but he’s also a reliable entertainer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There’s something irresistible about watching two people fall in love, even in contrived, sniffle- and sometimes gag-inducing films like Last Chance Harvey.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The director Yan-Ting Yuen revisits the country's recent past to explore the history and legacy of one of the strangest byproducts of totalitarian madness: the revolutionary spectacular.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    In Freedom Writers Hilary Swank uses neediness to fine effect in a film with a strong emotional tug and smartly laid foundation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This isn’t, it turns out, the usual once upon a time, but a story about the unknowns that can swallow us up.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    What cuts through the filmmaking clutter are the young women and men who share their accounts of abuse by both their attackers and their schools.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Sin City has been made with such scrupulous care and obvious love for its genre influences that it's a shame the movie is kind of a bore.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The film effectively conveys the fears and frustrations of Palestinians struggling in a country that treats them as the enemy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A big, provocative and -- it goes without saying -- disturbing work, though what makes it most provocative is that its greatest ambitions are for its own visual style.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Nasty, brutal and unforgiving, A Walk Among the Tombstones is one of those rare contemporary cinematic offerings: intelligent pulp.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A screenplay that not only has a way with genre cliché, but manages to score some deviously witty political points
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There's nothing obscure about young love and loss, and a story, as Mr. Jiménez put it, about "youngsters who have to deal with this sudden lack of certainties which makes them more lonely than they could have ever imagined."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Although Vicky Cristina trips along winningly, carried by the beauty of its locations and stars -- and all the gauzy romanticism those enchanted places and people imply -- it reverberates with implacable melancholy, a sense of loss.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This paranoid thriller has all the failings we expect...but Enemy of the State also has enough wit, talent and narrative thrust to mostly transcend those flaws, at least until that ludicrous finish.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Extremely likable and has value as a historical document specifically because it includes snippets from a dozen later-life interviews with Photo League members like Rosalie Gwathmey and Mr. Engel.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Kerrigan isn't just playing with our sympathies; he's also playing with our assumptions. That keeps the tension going.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Stuffed with playful character actors and carpeted with wall-to-wall tunes, the film makes for easy viewing and easier listening.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Catching Fire isn’t a great work of art but it’s a competent, at times exciting movie and it does something that better, more artistically notable movies often fail to do: It speaks to its moment in time.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This genial comedy is as unambitious and, at times, as funny as its high concept.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Schadenfreude carries a delectable tang no matter the language, and as the history of Hollywood shows, stories about pretty people behaving badly remain reliably alluring.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A small movie with a full heart, Undertow takes an old idea - the loving, lingering ghost - and gives it reverberant, resuscitated life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The overall effect is part BBC-style biography, part Hollywood-like hagiography, and generally pleasing and often moving, even when the story wobbles off the historical rails or becomes bogged down in dopey romance.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Despite the filmmakers’ efforts to persuade us that The Young Victoria is a serious work, and despite some tense moments and gunfire, the movie’s pleasures are as light as its story. No matter. Albert may never rip Victoria’s bodice, but he does eventually loosen it, to her delight and ours.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Guest begins -- but doesn't end -- with caricatures, then peels away at our preconceptions until we see the heart and soul beneath.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Essentially and very effectively a rollicking smash-and-crash chase movie that happens to be surprisingly well acted.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This veteran Spanish director has, in his latest, created both a tribute to an art form and a performance archive.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This is the kind of cornball entertainment that rainy afternoons were made for. Throw in a cozy sofa too. Beastly will size down well on your television.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    If the second film never reaches the highs of the first -- we have met the players before and there are no new worlds of wonder -- it nonetheless invests moviegoing with a sense of adventure.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Tiny Furniture is at times more pleasurable to think about than it is to watch, more of a conceptual coup than an enjoyable experience.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Those swayed by the argument in Client 9 that some of the rich and powerful whom Mr. Spitzer crusaded against might have exploited his stupidity should find all this enthralling. Others might just remember the hubris.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Measured in tone and outraged in its argument, it is an emotionally stirring, at times crushingly depressing cinematic call to witness. It's also frustrating because while it re-examines the assault on the jogger and painstakingly walks you through what happened to the teenagers - from their arrest through their absolution - it fails to add anything substantively new.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's possible that two actors other than Samantha Morton and Jason Patric might do justice to Cecilia Miniucchi's story about two badly matched Santa Monica, Calif., parking enforcement officers who stumble and grope into a relationship. But it's hard to think of a better match for the stubborn idiosyncrasies of Ms. Miniucchi's visual style and worldview than these two.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Graced with a shimmering visual style and sense of lyrical self-consciousness that owes a debt to French visionary Jean Cocteau, the modest film provides further evidence of Mexico's recent cinematic renaissance.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The film's septuagenarian director deserves his share of the credit for bringing this human story to the screen with engaging B-movie modesty and no small measure of chops.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's the kind of outrageous, excessive flourish that can make Mr. Scott's work so enjoyable in the moment. He doesn't do much, but with a handful of appealing actors in tow, he sure keeps that machine going.
    • The New York Times
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Johnson throws a lot at the screen, blasted corpses included, yet little here is as initially transfixing as Mr. Gordon-Levitt's mug.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Crammed with friendly, sympathetic talking heads and pretty images of a stunned-looking Mr. Bruce, then 35, relearning life (he remembers how to walk but forgot family and friends), the film comes up frustratingly short when it comes to the particulars.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Even as the gathering melodramatic storms threaten to swamp this pungent slice of life, Mr. Cretton manages to earn your tears honestly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The film is good news nonetheless - it's a store-bought valentine with real heart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Szifron creates inhabited worlds with comic timing and visual flair, but you can hear him chortling as he shovels his people into the grinder.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    In this film Mr. Coppola blurs dreams and everyday life and suggests that through visual and narrative experimentation he has begun the search for new ways of making meaning, new holy places for him and for us. He may not have found them yet, but, then, he’s just waking up.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Taken on the level of spectacle rather than of sense, The Last Samurai affords the sort of fizzy enjoyment that can come with epic movie endeavors, including a meticulously detailed world unlike our own, an excellent supporting cast and some pulse-pounding fights.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A smart, effectively unsettling movie about the need to believe and the hard, cruel arts of persuasion.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Although Mr. Pawlikowski often shows Mr. Hawke in medium and long shots, the actor draws you close. There's anguish in Tom's face that speaks of a terrible fragility and that leavens the story's mysterioso proceedings with a real, recognizable humanity.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A portrait of the artist as a refusenik, a recluse, a survivor and a stubborn question mark, “Fifi Howls From Happiness” registers, by turns, as a celebration, an excavation and an increasingly urgent rescue mission.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    While compromised by the uplift and affirmation that mainstream animation regurgitates like a mommy penguin, it also shows a remarkable persistence of vision. Even in a story about singing-and-dancing fat and feather, Mr. Miller can’t help but go dark and deep.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Working again with Diego Martínez Vignatti, the cinematographer for "Japón," the director doesn't just seize our attention; he commands it - forcing us into a world of terror and beauty.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    In Edge of Tomorrow, Mr. Liman brings Mr. Cruise’s smile out of semiretirement and also gives him the kind of physical challenges at which he so brilliantly excels.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The script for Mockingjay Part 1, credited to Peter Craig and Danny Strong, gets the job done, but the performers matter far more than the words they deliver.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Woody Allen’s latest excursion to the dark side of human nature, is good enough that you may wonder why he doesn’t just stop making comedies once and for all.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Hit So Hard is the touching story of how and why Ms. Schemel ended up in her own private hell and how and why she made her way out again into the world of sunshine, sobriety and puppy dogs.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    An entertainingly ridiculous update of Mary O’Hara’s 1941 children’s novel, “My Friend Flicka.”
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Myers too often tells rather than shows, and she doesn’t have the cinematic skill set to transform her idea into a fully satisfying movie, especially at this low-budget level.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Filled with brilliant filmmaking and features outstanding performances, but it's neither profound enough nor pop enough to be great -- it's mournful, serious, beautiful and, finally, pointless.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    No matter how seriously everyone works to make the CIA impossibly sexy, the illusion that these pencil pushers are incarnations of Bond, James Bond, is difficult to sustain.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Broomfield maintains a level of cool detachment throughout. That's to the good of the movie, which, though technically exemplary, falters dramatically on occasion, becoming dangerously close to overheated whenever the characters speak for any length.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's good -- when it's not adrift in an absence of meaning.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Best appreciated for its sustained creepy vibe and sporadically arresting images, Heartless moves from one outré moment to another, from one self-conscious allusion to the next ("Donnie Darko" and "Taxi Driver"). It doesn't go anywhere special or much of anywhere, though it goes there in appreciably icky style.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Unforgivable isn't one of Mr. Téchiné's greatest achievements, but it's engrossing even when its increasingly populated story falters, tripped up by unpersuasive actions, connections and details.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Cyrus is more finely tuned than their earlier movies ("The Puffy Chair," "Baghead"), but it shares a similar, almost aggressive lack of ambition. John doesn't work hard and neither do the Duplasses, who don't want their audiences to break a sweat either. That's too bad, because Cyrus is more interesting and fun when you're recoiling at the effrontery of its comedy and not its conventionality.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Despite the slow start Mr. Condon closes the series in fine, smooth style. He gives fans all the lovely flowers, conditioned hair and lightly erotic, dreamy kisses they deserve.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    At once a heartfelt story about a family undone by violence and an overburdened allegory of fascism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Webb's Spider-Man movie works only because he keeps the whole package, at least until the requisite final blowout, tethered to his two appealing leads.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Animal people sometimes say the wackiest things, but here, alas, they never satisfyingly address the ethical questions of what it means to capture and keep wild animals. Happily, while this movie's head may not always be in the right place, its heart is.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Although Ms. Davenport pushes the analogy between this modest rescue operation with America’s invasion of Iraq a bit too forcefully, she nonetheless makes her point with persuasive, touching candor.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    [Proyas] hasn't yet learned how to enliven his characters as fully as his sets. Part of this is structural (somnolence is built into the script), but the greater fault lies with Proyas' direction of his performers, most of whom deliver their lines in a strangulated whisper.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Lemmons has a tough time finding her tone. From scene to scene, the actors are good and then less so, while the direction wavers from assured to unsteady.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There are not one, but two wars raging inside this adaptation: one between the North and the South, and another, more calamitous war between art and middlebrow entertainment.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The movie is as blunt an instrument as the poster, but it’s also crammed with enough moving parts and unexpected distractions (Winona Ryder as a “meth whore”) to make it an indefensibly enjoyable piece of exploitation hackwork.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    In the end there might not be much to this tale other than titillation, but there's plenty to be said for Ms. Ronan, who was the best thing about "Atonement" and holds her ground against forceful screen presences like Ms. Blanchett and Mr. Bana.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Nicely directed, the film version proves refreshingly free of the customary blights that affect most modern children's movies, notably adult condescension. But, man, is it mean.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Watching this reasonably funny, professionally assembled calculation is a little like snuggling up in front of the television with a mug of hot cocoa and a warm blanket. Those who prefer their drinks and recreation spiked would do well to look elsewhere.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A nondramatic work best appreciated as a pure image-and-sound event.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Neither the screenplay nor the direction has the requisite depth to turn the banality of one unremarkable life into the stuff of Chekhov, much less of Mr. Payne.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There's so much that's right in it that its blunders are all the more frustrating.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The tick tick tock of the mortal clock gives the science-fiction thriller In Time its slick, sweet premise.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A dreamy, elliptical neo-noir about a cop turned killer turned something else altogether.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There are, once again, too many busy, uninterestingly staged battles that lean heavily on obvious, sometimes distracting digital sorcery. But there are also pacific, brooding interludes in which the actors — notably Mr. Freeman, an intensely appealing screen presence — remind you that there’s more to Middle-earth than clamor and struggle.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Con Air is entertaining in an extravagantly decadent sort of way. It just isn't a movie.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Basset is too enamored of the usual action film clichés, down to some Hollywood-gangsta gun play. But he has a graphic visual style that suits the simplistic material and he keeps you watching even as the wet, sucking sounds of skewered flesh grow tedious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There's plenty of frantic energy here, lots of noise and money too, but what's absent is any sense of rediscovery, the kind that's necessary whenever a filmmaker dusts off an old formula or a genre standard.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Neither an atrocity nor a revelation, The Brown Bunny is a very watchable, often beautiful-looking attempt by Mr. Gallo to reproduce the kind of loosely structured mood pieces that found American and select foreign-language cinemas of the 1960's and 70's often at their most adventurous.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Visually sumptuous if disappointingly hollow account of Hughes's early life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    An alternately fascinating and disquietingly intimate portrait of a 1960s American family falling apart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    That the film works as well as it does, delivering a tough first hour only to disintegrate like a wet newspaper, testifies to the skill of the filmmakers as well as to the constraints brought on them by an industry that insists on slapping a pretty bow on even the foulest truth.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    In the main, Mr. Palm sticks to the usual biopic formula: a chronological account of a heroic individual told through talking heads, still photographs and film clips. Mr. Palm's principal deviation from this formula is that some of the interviews take place in moving cars.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Less outright terrifying than under-the-skin shivery, this psychological thriller from sui generis Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa breaks nearly all the rules -- including those of narrative logic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's an unshowy, generous performance [by Franco] and it greatly humanizes a movie that, as it shifts genre gears and cranks up the noise, becomes disappointingly sober and self-serious.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Zoo
    Paradoxically, it is precisely because Mr. Devor refuses to acknowledge the murkiness that clings to every frame in his film, because he refuses to engage with the world beyond that of the zoophiles, that they seem like creatures from some never-ending night.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    At once frantically overblown and beautifully filigreed, Man of Steel will turn on everyone it doesn’t turn off.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A passably amusing romantic comedy with a laugh-strewn script that's almost undone by the hard sell of an enterprise that drills every emotional beat into your head.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The plot doesn't rate as high as the quality of the bodies in fast, furious motion. What counts in The Transporter isn't the wafer-thin story about smugglers -- it's the way Martin kicks open a door, fends off a couple of axes and uses a perfectly ordinary sport shirt as a weapon.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Just as there is something undeniably pleasant about an entertainment like Tristan & Isolde that delivers exactly what it promises, no less, no more.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Although the digital dinos look great, especially the clumsy stegosaurs, Spielberg and screenwriter David Koepp have failed to absorb the single most important lesson from the movies they've looted: If your people aren't interesting, at least make your monsters memorable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    What's most frustrating about the movie isn't that it thinks so little of its heroine that it can't let her figure out the moral of her own story, but that it thinks so little of us as to suggest that, after a couple millennia of human struggle, it's indeed possible to answer the unanswerable.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    More of a sketch than a fully developed portrait.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There are good movies and plenty more bad ones and many, many more that fall somewhere in between. And then there are enjoyable absurdities like Welcome to the Punch, which contain evaluative multitudes and which, scene by scene, register as not bad, pretty good and flat-out ridiculous.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Diaz has found her down-and-dirty element in the kind of broad comedy that threatens to get ugly and more or less succeeds on that threat.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    However caricatured a vision of female empowerment, Lara Croft exercises an irresistible tug not just on the adolescent male imagination but the 12-year-old female imagination as well.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    As is the case with other unsatisfactory diversions, it is entirely possible to ignore the worst parts of this movie, to drift along during the lulls, slide over the half-baked jokes and just wait for Ms. McCarthy and Mr. Bateman to do their things.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Whether she's lying in bed, her gray hair spilling out around her head, or exalting in existence itself during one of several flashbacks, Elizabeth draws you in, which works for the story and simultaneously unbalances it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    What keeps you watching isn't the story or the actors, none of whom are at the top of their form, but the relentlessness of Friedkin's vision. The film has great forward thrust -- Friedkin's a full-throttle guy -- and the director knows where to put the camera.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    No life is seamless, and not every biographical portrait needs to be, but this one is so riddled with awkward transitions, including on the soundtrack, that it tends to lurch distractingly, as if Mr. Mori were still trying to figure out how to piece the whole thing together.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A sly, amusing if underconceptulized and needlessly elliptical inquiry into truth, memory and appearances.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Frank Langella plays so many variations on cute and crotchety and with such suppleness - he's by turns a charming codger, a silver fox and a wise graybeard - that his performance comes close to a saving grace.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The first 20 minutes of Wolfgang Petersen’s new action adventure, Air Force One, are so thrillingly choreographed (and so very, very loud), it’s all the more disappointing that the balance of the movie tends to move less like a Stealth bomber and more like a jalopy — jerking fitfully from plot hole to plot hole, only occasionally finding momentum.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    By the time Rachel Weisz, as a scientist called Dr. Marta Shearing, showed up in a lab coat, I stopped trying to parse every plot twist and just went with the action flow.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Closer in texture and consistency to individually wrapped American cheese than good, tangy English cheddar. But even humble plastic-wrapped cheese has its virtues and so does this film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The rather lost-looking Mr. Amalric, most recently seen on screens giving his left eyeball a furious workout in “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly,” maintains a suitably funereal mien throughout.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Hero is easy on the eyes, but it's too segmented to gather much momentum and too art-directed to convey much urgency.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The absurdity of the story in the largely thrill-free thriller Contraband, its hairpin twists and outrageous coincidences, may keep even hungry action fans away. That's too bad because the story doesn't matter. (It rarely does.)
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. McDowell manages and massages the mystery, even while he forgets to do much with the camera except periodically have it chase after someone. He can be frustratingly inattentive to the visual possibilities offered by the story.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The story, which starts promisingly only to stop, restart, sputter and come to a wheezing, disappointing puff of nada, proves the least satisfying part of the whole. The finale certainly isn't earned, but all the nasty, tiny jolts throughout the movie do prick the skin nicely.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Alternately frustrating and rewarding film.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Written by Vince Gilligan and directed by newcomer Dean Parisot, Home Fries is far too cute and eager to please, but Barrymore and Wilson are charming, and O'Hara is a blast.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Nominally a story about sex, lies and faithfulness, Last Night is more truly a cautionary tale about mousetrap narratives.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Isn't half bad and every so often is pretty good, filled with real sentiment, worked-through performances and a story textured enough to sometimes feel a lot like life.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Although the presence of Mr. Sheen is initially distracting, it soon becomes the movie's greatest asset. There is, as it turns out, some benefit to having a real performance even in a formulaic entertainment like this.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Quirky goes a surprisingly long way before stalling out in Don McKay, an oddball comedy with the knowing, festering heart of a neo-noir.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's a slam-dunk of an opener in a film filled with terrifically choreographed action and very little on its mind.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    While it's frustrating that Mr. Palmer doesn't dig deep into the complexities of the fights, one of the movie's strengths is the honesty with which he confesses his doubts about them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    One problem is Jimmy and his mother's dialogue, which continues in the same clichéd vein as the opening scenes of him alone yelling and yammering into his cell.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    This is harmless stuff, and sometimes it's actually pretty funny, too.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The movie has its diversions, including Scarlett Johansson's bodacious Janet Leigh and Michael Stuhlbarg's wheedling Lew Wasserman. It's fluff. But while its dim fantasies about Hitchcock and the association of genius with psychosis can be written off as silly, they also smack of spiteful jealousy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Diverting if heavily padded, this is the newest addition to an increasingly crowded field of political nonfiction films and certainly the easiest viewing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    That The Assassination of Richard Nixon is as well directed, acted and shot as it is makes Mr. Mueller's inability to invest his film with significance all the more disappointing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    An improvement on the original, but that isn't saying much.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The actors don’t do all the heavy lifting by themselves. The uniformly good performances make it clear that Mr. Melfi knows how to handle actors, and there are some funny bits.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    As it turns out, nothing else in Tracks matches the dramatic pow of a camel being relieved of his testes. Despite the otherworldly scenery and some predictable tragedy — Robyn can be maddeningly careless about the welfare of her animals — this proves to be a rather logy amble.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It’s a theme as familiar as life. The five women, all perfectly cast and almost perfectly played.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    For all Mr. Boyle’s labors Trance principally comes off as a showcase for his brio, a spirit that animates all his choices, visual and otherwise.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Here, it's the creepily quiet stuff, the stuff that might be rushed over in a different movie -- Annie shivering alone in bed or being visited by her dead grandmother as she hangs out the wash -- that makes the film more than a generic distraction.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Again and again Katniss rescues herself with resourcefulness, guts and true aim, a combination that makes her insistently watchable, despite Mr. Ross's soft touch and Ms. Lawrence's bland performance.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Carrey is such an attention hog that most actresses have a hard time holding on to their corner of the screen when he's onboard, especially in broader comedies. But Ms. Leoni never cedes her ground. Both performers exude such acute neediness - there's a touch of Jerry Lewis and Lucille Ball in their mutual frenzy - that not to love them even a little would seem cruel.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    In the end, like a lot of genre movies, this one pulls from different inspirations, and so weighs in, by turns, as overly predictable and satisfyingly recognizable (part of genre cinema's one-two punch).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Breaking the Frame is a tantalizing teaser for a story that still needs to be told.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A divertingly goofy thriller with an animistic bent, moments of shivery and twitchy suspense and a solid lead performance from Mark Wahlberg.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It’s too bad that the filmmakers don’t allow an occasional breath of air into the sepulchral proceedings or ease up on the increasingly heavy-handed lessons.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    This bit of fluff overflows with so much honest charm it barely matters that it's one in a seemingly endless succession of Tarzan retreads.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Miller and his co-writer, Tom Phelan, manage to get under your skin largely with borrowed implements, though they receive solid support from Willem Dafoe and the resourceful veteran cinematographer Fred Murphy.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Brilliantly edited and gorgeously shot, Esther Kahn is a dream to look at and, courtesy of Howard Shore's minor chords and high-strung strings, definitely something to hear.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A nicely cast, respectable remake.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Ivin doesn't have a strong narrative line to play with or become distracted by, but he takes off on some lovely detours, whether he's narrowing in on Chook or going wide to take in the world that waits beyond.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The Cool School, is, well, cool, but it’s also fairly parochial.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Exactly the sort of good bad movie that Hollywood does best -- it's big, worthless fun.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Meyers, whose ambitions are telegraphed by her film's title, which directly invokes George Cukor's lovely 1938 romp "Holiday," has created a cumbersome vehicle by saddling Iris with a flamboyantly glamorous Los Angeles double, Amanda. As played by Cameron Diaz with oodles of charm and not an ounce of persuasion, Amanda doesn’t as much mirror Iris's love troubles as throw them into wincing relief.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like the film, the characters mean well and look good. But they're so deeply immersed in their own heads that they can't see the world for their needs.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Much like its young hero, played by Daniel Radcliffe, the film has begun to show signs of stress around the edges, a bit of fatigue, or maybe that’s just my gnawing impatience.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like oversolicitous lovers, the filmmakers are hung up on foreplay -- and not enough old-fashioned teenage raunch.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    As erratically enjoyable as it is consistently ridiculous, the martial arts pastiche The Man With the Iron Fists is the latest evidence that the vogue for neo-exploitation cinema shows no sign of flagging.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Still, despite the visual clumsiness and the production's tattered seams, I found myself rooting for this movie anyway, partly because Lindsey and Ben make a nice fit, as do the actors playing them, partly because the Farrellys bring so much heart to their movies, and partly because Ms. Barrymore inspires more goodwill than any other young actress I can think of working today in American movies.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    At once a sick comedy, a bile-raising thriller and a genre pastiche, Save the Green Planet is a welter of conflicting tones, dissonant moods and warring intentions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Malick dangles his maddeningly innocent ideas about life and death and man's gift for self-destruction.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Gleeson, Mr. Farrell and especially the late-arriving and welcome Mr. Fiennes have great fun rummaging around inside Mr. McDonagh’s modest bag of tricks.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Doesn’t have the original’s wooden performances, puffy clothes and hairdos or its amusingly crude special effects, but it does share its blood lust.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    What the movie ends up in desperate need of is a sense of life made real and palpable through dreadful, transporting details, not a life embalmed in hagiographic awe.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Parigi -- who's clearly made a close study of Alfred Hitchcock's obsessions and has watched a fair share of intelligent horror perched between cheekiness and Grand Guignol (think "Re-Animator") -- succeeds nicely.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The film's gadgetry is pricier, but the leering is strictly the Playboy joke page circa 1967.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's too little Grier too late, but it's also fairly satisfying to watch.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    For all its flaws, its obvious if irrelevant similarity to "Dead Poets Society," it lets us spend some quality time with some of the finest actresses in American film as they give energetic life to one of the most radically underrepresented minorities in Hollywood: the intelligent woman.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Consciously or not, coherently or not, Maleficent tells a new kind of story about how we live now, not once upon another time. And it does so by suggesting, among other things, that budding girls and older women are not natural foes, even if that’s what fairy tales, Hollywood and the world like to tell us.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The results are likable, unsurprising and principally a showcase for the pretty young cast, notably Mr. Miller, who brings texture to his witty if sensitive gay quipster.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    In the end, neither the appealing cast -- nor the force of Scott's stunning imagery is enough to make us understand why these men died.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    One of the most enjoyably inane movies of the season, this faux Southern Gothic offers an embarrassment of geek pleasures.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Pleasurable, daffy if at times daft.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Thin but pleasantly diverting documentary
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Save for Ms. Davis's, however, the performances are almost all overly broad, sometimes excruciatingly so, characterized by loud laughs, bugging eyes and pumping limbs.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Everything looks professional if undistinguished.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Held together by the blues -- Brown's prose and Howard's performance, Big Bad Love is a mess, but it's a sincere mess, beautifully shot by Paul Ryan and faithfully adapted by screenwriter James Howard.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There's something overly studied, almost clinical, in how it all pulls together.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like, you know, genius. But, like, you know, why?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Roger Nygards’ sweet, gently funny documentary about the wild and woolly fans of all things Star Trek doesn’t really reveal much about the original landmark series and its various spinoffs, nor does it ever really get to the heart of the shows’ enduring appeal.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There's no defense for movies like these, but neither do they warrant apology; they're irresistibly watchable, like car wrecks.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Although too compressed by half, the film manages to recreate what, at one point, the hectoring narrator will call an "archaeology of repression."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Race is raised as a possible reason for Idris’s and Seun’s problems, and then other potential determinants (a learning disorder, illness) are introduced. But the filmmakers don’t engage with these life events and issues: They just line them up as if their significance were transparent.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Sometimes a movie's charm materializes where you least expect it and in this particular case it emerges in the unlikely form of Henderson's character, Scotland Yard detective Janet Losey.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A sui generis excursion into sex and race that is by turns terrible...and close to divine.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There’s nothing wrong with Mr. Redford and his love of nature. But there’s something irritatingly softheaded about the generic, nostalgia-tinged blandishments that the film finally resorts to -- a Wendell Berry poem, a grizzled old farmer wielding a sickle -- in place of truly hard questions and solutions that may effect meaningful change. With the polar ice caps melting, I want more than poetry and blame. I want a plan.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The actors certainly look as if they’re having a good time, and if you’re in the right mood, you might too.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The movie keeps you watching and generally engaged.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Though Edward and Bella reach certain heights in Twilight, notably during a charming scene that finds them leaping from piney treetop to treetop against the spectacular wilderness backdrop, the story’s moral undertow keeps dragging them down.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Water Lilies is a nice, watchable, attractive, minor work. What it lacks is a sense of purpose, a commitment not just to its characters but also to its own reason for being.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The camera movements are graceful, almost ethereal, yet the objects themselves - with their impastos of organic and inorganic materials, their metaphoric resonances, historical allusions and intimations of war - feel unmistakably weighty.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The actors in Notes on a Scandal are equally distinguished: Ms. Dench and Ms. Blanchett are among the finest on the market today, and each can deliver expert performances, even when, as is the case here, their roles are false and hollow. The performers sell the goods, but the goods are cheap.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The film is neither about the Holocaust nor about those Germans who grappled with its legacy: it's about making the audience feel good about a historical catastrophe that grows fainter with each new tasteful interpolation.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's no surprise that Imamura has directed the best film in September 11, which is doubtless why the producer saved it for last.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    All too predictably, as if obeying some rule of genre, the director trades in his more involved ideas about alienation and voyeurism for an eruption of violence, then tags on some nonsense about marital fidelity.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The film is imperfect, periodically if unsurprisingly sentimental, overly tidy and often very moving.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Michell whips the camera around too much and cuts into his scenes too quickly, but he pumps juice into this thin story and, together with his performers, keeps a movie going that might otherwise crash-land.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The bigger and truer stars of this enjoyable, sometimes accidentally entertaining movie are the five horses that take turns playing Secretariat.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Demands to be seen, if only for its beauty.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Even at his shakiest, Mr. Blomkamp holds your attention with stories about characters banding together to emerge from a hell not of their own making, a liberation journey that just isn’t the same old, same old when a director was born in South Africa.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Spectacularly grotesque and literally nauseating, even for this usually intrepid moviegoer, In My Skin is among the more disturbing films in this blood-drenched cinematic season.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There’s a lot in this story about victimization and agency that Mr. Epstein and Mr. Friedman never satisfactorily address. It’s perhaps inevitable that they seem happier when nothing yet feels at stake, including during the production of “Deep Throat.”
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    In Search of a Midnight Kiss has its derivative moments along with awkward patches -- the inelegantly shaped climax tries to force uninteresting parallels between the two central couples -- it manages the difficult task of creating a sustained, plausible and inviting world.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Mekas makes little attempt to smooth out his transitions between takes or scenes, which only reinforces the intensely personal, even handmade nature of the work.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The Reckoning isn't great by any means and there are moments during the final stretch when it isn't even good. But for its first hour or so, the story moves at a steady clip, generating enough mystery to keep you guessing and enough atmosphere to keep you interested.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Loving Jackie Chan has always been easy, which is why it would be nice if he could find better material in which to bask in his long-sought American stardom or, alternately, ease into bad movies as effortlessly as his co-star.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Despite its spasms of brutality and a swerve into the macabre, After the Apocalypse is, by comparison with more recent films of this type (the "Mad Max" series), gentle at heart and terribly sincere.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The stilted and awkward physical and vocal performances in combination with the visually flat cinematography bring to mind the look, sound and visual texture of American daytime soaps, an association that perversely makes the movie more and more watchable.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Even when they don't always add up, these are movies in which De Niro can shrug off the burden of being Robert De Niro. Where the star who was Travis Bickle can again freely assume the part of the great character actor -- if only this time to ask, "You laughin' at me?"
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    As demented and entertaining as promised, and a little less idiotic than feared.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Sandler smirks a good deal less than he did in his last two movies, and with a couple of acting lessons, he might develop into a screen presence.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Director Tony Kaye may be reaching for opera, but screenwriter David McKenna has set his sights distinctly lower.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Only when Jodie Foster materializes midstory, delivering a beautiful, pocket-size performance as the mistress of one of the condemned men, does the film spring to life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A coming-of-adulthood story that improbably blends a plaintive drama with romantic longing and far-out science fiction.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Has the makings of a great documentary, but a subject as complex as this demands greater rigor, deeper intelligence and a sense of dialectics.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Silberling has made a movie that's far rougher in texture and tone than Mr. Handler's books, but while he doesn't have the author's sense of whimsy (or irony) he manages to construct a pleasantly watchable entertainment in all the spaces in the story not laid siege to by Mr. Carrey.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    While it’s a visual enchantment (there’s a knockout compendium of horror film clichés), its reversion to a largely male domain after “Brave,” its first and only female-driven story, is a drag.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A portrait of dispossession so acute that it's caused a few critics to cry, Let her eat cake!
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    To transcend cliché, movies like Narc need the passion of a heretic who can take stock characters with their stock predicaments and turn them inside out, the way Curtis Hanson and Quentin Tarantino do. Blood, guts and flash aren't enough.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    On a purely visual level, it's the most powerful and viscerally exciting movie to come out of Hollywood this year. Which doesn't mean that it's all good.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    At its strongest, Gone Girl plays like a queasily, at times gleefully, funny horror movie about a modern marriage, one that has disintegrated partly because of spiraling downward mobility and lost privilege. Yet, as sometimes happens in Mr. Fincher’s work, dread descends like winter shadows, darkening the movie’s tone and visuals until it’s snuffed out all the light, air and nuance.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Although that's enough plot for two movies, Niccol proceeds to clog up his meticulously mounted story with a murder and a romance (hence Uma Thurman), allowing needless intrigue to distract from his ideas.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Lighter than a meringue and as insubstantial, the French boulevard comedy The Women on the 6th Floor was designed for the gentle laughter it easily earns.

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