Manohla Dargis

Select another critic »
For 1,811 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Manohla Dargis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 4 Months, 3 Weeks and 2 Days
Lowest review score: 0 The Replacement Killers
Score distribution:
1811 movie reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Basset is too enamored of the usual action film clichés, down to some Hollywood-gangsta gun play. But he has a graphic visual style that suits the simplistic material and he keeps you watching even as the wet, sucking sounds of skewered flesh grow tedious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There's plenty of frantic energy here, lots of noise and money too, but what's absent is any sense of rediscovery, the kind that's necessary whenever a filmmaker dusts off an old formula or a genre standard.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Neither an atrocity nor a revelation, The Brown Bunny is a very watchable, often beautiful-looking attempt by Mr. Gallo to reproduce the kind of loosely structured mood pieces that found American and select foreign-language cinemas of the 1960's and 70's often at their most adventurous.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Visually sumptuous if disappointingly hollow account of Hughes's early life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    An alternately fascinating and disquietingly intimate portrait of a 1960s American family falling apart.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    That the film works as well as it does, delivering a tough first hour only to disintegrate like a wet newspaper, testifies to the skill of the filmmakers as well as to the constraints brought on them by an industry that insists on slapping a pretty bow on even the foulest truth.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    In the main, Mr. Palm sticks to the usual biopic formula: a chronological account of a heroic individual told through talking heads, still photographs and film clips. Mr. Palm's principal deviation from this formula is that some of the interviews take place in moving cars.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Less outright terrifying than under-the-skin shivery, this psychological thriller from sui generis Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa breaks nearly all the rules -- including those of narrative logic.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's an unshowy, generous performance [by Franco] and it greatly humanizes a movie that, as it shifts genre gears and cranks up the noise, becomes disappointingly sober and self-serious.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Zoo
    Paradoxically, it is precisely because Mr. Devor refuses to acknowledge the murkiness that clings to every frame in his film, because he refuses to engage with the world beyond that of the zoophiles, that they seem like creatures from some never-ending night.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    At once frantically overblown and beautifully filigreed, Man of Steel will turn on everyone it doesn’t turn off.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A passably amusing romantic comedy with a laugh-strewn script that's almost undone by the hard sell of an enterprise that drills every emotional beat into your head.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The plot doesn't rate as high as the quality of the bodies in fast, furious motion. What counts in The Transporter isn't the wafer-thin story about smugglers -- it's the way Martin kicks open a door, fends off a couple of axes and uses a perfectly ordinary sport shirt as a weapon.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Just as there is something undeniably pleasant about an entertainment like Tristan & Isolde that delivers exactly what it promises, no less, no more.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Although the digital dinos look great, especially the clumsy stegosaurs, Spielberg and screenwriter David Koepp have failed to absorb the single most important lesson from the movies they've looted: If your people aren't interesting, at least make your monsters memorable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    What's most frustrating about the movie isn't that it thinks so little of its heroine that it can't let her figure out the moral of her own story, but that it thinks so little of us as to suggest that, after a couple millennia of human struggle, it's indeed possible to answer the unanswerable.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    More of a sketch than a fully developed portrait.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It’s cute for a while. The stars are pros, and their scenes, often staged so that the characters are within breathing distance of each other, have snap.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There are good movies and plenty more bad ones and many, many more that fall somewhere in between. And then there are enjoyable absurdities like Welcome to the Punch, which contain evaluative multitudes and which, scene by scene, register as not bad, pretty good and flat-out ridiculous.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Diaz has found her down-and-dirty element in the kind of broad comedy that threatens to get ugly and more or less succeeds on that threat.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    However caricatured a vision of female empowerment, Lara Croft exercises an irresistible tug not just on the adolescent male imagination but the 12-year-old female imagination as well.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    As is the case with other unsatisfactory diversions, it is entirely possible to ignore the worst parts of this movie, to drift along during the lulls, slide over the half-baked jokes and just wait for Ms. McCarthy and Mr. Bateman to do their things.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Whether she's lying in bed, her gray hair spilling out around her head, or exalting in existence itself during one of several flashbacks, Elizabeth draws you in, which works for the story and simultaneously unbalances it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    What keeps you watching isn't the story or the actors, none of whom are at the top of their form, but the relentlessness of Friedkin's vision. The film has great forward thrust -- Friedkin's a full-throttle guy -- and the director knows where to put the camera.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    No life is seamless, and not every biographical portrait needs to be, but this one is so riddled with awkward transitions, including on the soundtrack, that it tends to lurch distractingly, as if Mr. Mori were still trying to figure out how to piece the whole thing together.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A sly, amusing if underconceptulized and needlessly elliptical inquiry into truth, memory and appearances.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Frank Langella plays so many variations on cute and crotchety and with such suppleness - he's by turns a charming codger, a silver fox and a wise graybeard - that his performance comes close to a saving grace.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The first 20 minutes of Wolfgang Petersen’s new action adventure, Air Force One, are so thrillingly choreographed (and so very, very loud), it’s all the more disappointing that the balance of the movie tends to move less like a Stealth bomber and more like a jalopy — jerking fitfully from plot hole to plot hole, only occasionally finding momentum.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    By the time Rachel Weisz, as a scientist called Dr. Marta Shearing, showed up in a lab coat, I stopped trying to parse every plot twist and just went with the action flow.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Closer in texture and consistency to individually wrapped American cheese than good, tangy English cheddar. But even humble plastic-wrapped cheese has its virtues and so does this film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Heineman has said that he wanted Cartel Land to feel like a narrative film as much as possible, and to an extent it does. What’s missing is a directorial point of view, including about vigilante groups, the so-called war on drugs, and Mexican and American policies and politics.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Working from Richard Raymond Harry Herbeck’s script, Mr. Thelin plays with genre clichés without upending them, and the results are more creepy than scary.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The rather lost-looking Mr. Amalric, most recently seen on screens giving his left eyeball a furious workout in “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly,” maintains a suitably funereal mien throughout.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The absurdity of the story in the largely thrill-free thriller Contraband, its hairpin twists and outrageous coincidences, may keep even hungry action fans away. That's too bad because the story doesn't matter. (It rarely does.)
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. McDowell manages and massages the mystery, even while he forgets to do much with the camera except periodically have it chase after someone. He can be frustratingly inattentive to the visual possibilities offered by the story.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The story, which starts promisingly only to stop, restart, sputter and come to a wheezing, disappointing puff of nada, proves the least satisfying part of the whole. The finale certainly isn't earned, but all the nasty, tiny jolts throughout the movie do prick the skin nicely.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Alternately frustrating and rewarding film.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Written by Vince Gilligan and directed by newcomer Dean Parisot, Home Fries is far too cute and eager to please, but Barrymore and Wilson are charming, and O'Hara is a blast.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Nominally a story about sex, lies and faithfulness, Last Night is more truly a cautionary tale about mousetrap narratives.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Isn't half bad and every so often is pretty good, filled with real sentiment, worked-through performances and a story textured enough to sometimes feel a lot like life.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Although the presence of Mr. Sheen is initially distracting, it soon becomes the movie's greatest asset. There is, as it turns out, some benefit to having a real performance even in a formulaic entertainment like this.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Quirky goes a surprisingly long way before stalling out in Don McKay, an oddball comedy with the knowing, festering heart of a neo-noir.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's a slam-dunk of an opener in a film filled with terrifically choreographed action and very little on its mind.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    While it's frustrating that Mr. Palmer doesn't dig deep into the complexities of the fights, one of the movie's strengths is the honesty with which he confesses his doubts about them.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    One problem is Jimmy and his mother's dialogue, which continues in the same clichéd vein as the opening scenes of him alone yelling and yammering into his cell.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    This is harmless stuff, and sometimes it's actually pretty funny, too.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The movie has its diversions, including Scarlett Johansson's bodacious Janet Leigh and Michael Stuhlbarg's wheedling Lew Wasserman. It's fluff. But while its dim fantasies about Hitchcock and the association of genius with psychosis can be written off as silly, they also smack of spiteful jealousy.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Diverting if heavily padded, this is the newest addition to an increasingly crowded field of political nonfiction films and certainly the easiest viewing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    That The Assassination of Richard Nixon is as well directed, acted and shot as it is makes Mr. Mueller's inability to invest his film with significance all the more disappointing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    While it’s no surprise that Mr. Lumet can spin a tale, these murky-looking, less-than-flattering sit-downs are irritatingly suboptimal, particularly given that he was so great at telling intimate stories about men in shadows.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    An improvement on the original, but that isn't saying much.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The actors don’t do all the heavy lifting by themselves. The uniformly good performances make it clear that Mr. Melfi knows how to handle actors, and there are some funny bits.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Serviceably, at times awkwardly, directed by Mandie Fletcher, the movie skews softer than the series at its barbed best, partly because the celebrity culture that once provided such rich material has become just another ratings opportunity for the Kardashians.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    As it turns out, nothing else in Tracks matches the dramatic pow of a camel being relieved of his testes. Despite the otherworldly scenery and some predictable tragedy — Robyn can be maddeningly careless about the welfare of her animals — this proves to be a rather logy amble.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It’s a theme as familiar as life. The five women, all perfectly cast and almost perfectly played.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    For all Mr. Boyle’s labors Trance principally comes off as a showcase for his brio, a spirit that animates all his choices, visual and otherwise.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Here, it's the creepily quiet stuff, the stuff that might be rushed over in a different movie -- Annie shivering alone in bed or being visited by her dead grandmother as she hangs out the wash -- that makes the film more than a generic distraction.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Again and again Katniss rescues herself with resourcefulness, guts and true aim, a combination that makes her insistently watchable, despite Mr. Ross's soft touch and Ms. Lawrence's bland performance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The Overnight ends just as it starts to get interestingly messy, tapping into something real and sweetly touching.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Carrey is such an attention hog that most actresses have a hard time holding on to their corner of the screen when he's onboard, especially in broader comedies. But Ms. Leoni never cedes her ground. Both performers exude such acute neediness - there's a touch of Jerry Lewis and Lucille Ball in their mutual frenzy - that not to love them even a little would seem cruel.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    In the end, like a lot of genre movies, this one pulls from different inspirations, and so weighs in, by turns, as overly predictable and satisfyingly recognizable (part of genre cinema's one-two punch).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Breaking the Frame is a tantalizing teaser for a story that still needs to be told.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A divertingly goofy thriller with an animistic bent, moments of shivery and twitchy suspense and a solid lead performance from Mark Wahlberg.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It’s too bad that the filmmakers don’t allow an occasional breath of air into the sepulchral proceedings or ease up on the increasingly heavy-handed lessons.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    This bit of fluff overflows with so much honest charm it barely matters that it's one in a seemingly endless succession of Tarzan retreads.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Miller and his co-writer, Tom Phelan, manage to get under your skin largely with borrowed implements, though they receive solid support from Willem Dafoe and the resourceful veteran cinematographer Fred Murphy.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Brilliantly edited and gorgeously shot, Esther Kahn is a dream to look at and, courtesy of Howard Shore's minor chords and high-strung strings, definitely something to hear.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A nicely cast, respectable remake.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Ivin doesn't have a strong narrative line to play with or become distracted by, but he takes off on some lovely detours, whether he's narrowing in on Chook or going wide to take in the world that waits beyond.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The Cool School, is, well, cool, but it’s also fairly parochial.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Exactly the sort of good bad movie that Hollywood does best -- it's big, worthless fun.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Meyers, whose ambitions are telegraphed by her film's title, which directly invokes George Cukor's lovely 1938 romp "Holiday," has created a cumbersome vehicle by saddling Iris with a flamboyantly glamorous Los Angeles double, Amanda. As played by Cameron Diaz with oodles of charm and not an ounce of persuasion, Amanda doesn’t as much mirror Iris's love troubles as throw them into wincing relief.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It’s all very pretty, but too often the movie’s beauty isn’t tethered to deep feeling or strong ideas, one reason you may often find your eyes and thoughts drifting away from the quietly escalating drama toward the vast green fields, the majestic horses and nice detail work.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like the film, the characters mean well and look good. But they're so deeply immersed in their own heads that they can't see the world for their needs.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    For a Marvel agnostic like me, the single most interesting thing about Age of Ultron is that you can sense that Mr. Whedon, having helped build a universal earnings machine with the first “Avengers,” has now struggled mightily, touchingly, to invest this behemoth with some life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    In Infinitely Polar Bear, Ms. Forbes hasn’t made a movie about her father’s illness; she’s made one about her father, who, through hard and weird times, clearly helped give her what she needed so that one day she could tell this story.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Much like its young hero, played by Daniel Radcliffe, the film has begun to show signs of stress around the edges, a bit of fatigue, or maybe that’s just my gnawing impatience.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like oversolicitous lovers, the filmmakers are hung up on foreplay -- and not enough old-fashioned teenage raunch.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    As erratically enjoyable as it is consistently ridiculous, the martial arts pastiche The Man With the Iron Fists is the latest evidence that the vogue for neo-exploitation cinema shows no sign of flagging.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Still, despite the visual clumsiness and the production's tattered seams, I found myself rooting for this movie anyway, partly because Lindsey and Ben make a nice fit, as do the actors playing them, partly because the Farrellys bring so much heart to their movies, and partly because Ms. Barrymore inspires more goodwill than any other young actress I can think of working today in American movies.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    At once a sick comedy, a bile-raising thriller and a genre pastiche, Save the Green Planet is a welter of conflicting tones, dissonant moods and warring intentions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Malick dangles his maddeningly innocent ideas about life and death and man's gift for self-destruction.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Gleeson, Mr. Farrell and especially the late-arriving and welcome Mr. Fiennes have great fun rummaging around inside Mr. McDonagh’s modest bag of tricks.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Zoom, crash, repeat with squealing, burning and flaming tires — it’s all predictably absurd and self-mocking, and often a giggle when not a total yawn.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Does it add up? Not really, but it passes the time nicely, working best when Mr. Monahan keeps it vague and off-kilter as his characters roam among the Hollywood ghosts.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Doesn’t have the original’s wooden performances, puffy clothes and hairdos or its amusingly crude special effects, but it does share its blood lust.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    What the movie ends up in desperate need of is a sense of life made real and palpable through dreadful, transporting details, not a life embalmed in hagiographic awe.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Parigi -- who's clearly made a close study of Alfred Hitchcock's obsessions and has watched a fair share of intelligent horror perched between cheekiness and Grand Guignol (think "Re-Animator") -- succeeds nicely.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Cruise’s brisk, ingratiating performance — all smiles, hard-charging physicality and beads of sweat — does a lot to soften the edges. But Mr. Liman doesn’t press Mr. Cruise to dig into the character, and the actor mostly hurdles forward in a movie that never gets around to asking what makes Barry run and why.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    As she does, Ms. Theron locks down your attention immediately, holding you with her beauty and quiet vigilance.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The film's gadgetry is pricier, but the leering is strictly the Playboy joke page circa 1967.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's too little Grier too late, but it's also fairly satisfying to watch.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    For all its flaws, its obvious if irrelevant similarity to "Dead Poets Society," it lets us spend some quality time with some of the finest actresses in American film as they give energetic life to one of the most radically underrepresented minorities in Hollywood: the intelligent woman.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Consciously or not, coherently or not, Maleficent tells a new kind of story about how we live now, not once upon another time. And it does so by suggesting, among other things, that budding girls and older women are not natural foes, even if that’s what fairy tales, Hollywood and the world like to tell us.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The results are likable, unsurprising and principally a showcase for the pretty young cast, notably Mr. Miller, who brings texture to his witty if sensitive gay quipster.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    In the end, neither the appealing cast -- nor the force of Scott's stunning imagery is enough to make us understand why these men died.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    One of the most enjoyably inane movies of the season, this faux Southern Gothic offers an embarrassment of geek pleasures.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Pleasurable, daffy if at times daft.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The film’s solemnity is seductive — as is Mr. Scorsese’s art — especially in light of the triviality and primitiveness of many movies, even if its moments of greatness also make its failures seem more pronounced.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Thin but pleasantly diverting documentary
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Topicality is all or at least a large part of the movie’s draw.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Save for Ms. Davis's, however, the performances are almost all overly broad, sometimes excruciatingly so, characterized by loud laughs, bugging eyes and pumping limbs.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It is unexpectedly moving and occasionally delightful to spend time with these titans of cinema as they walk and sometimes wobble, delivering words that become meaningful because they’re lucky enough to be spoken by Mr. Redford and Mr. Nolte.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Everything looks professional if undistinguished.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Held together by the blues -- Brown's prose and Howard's performance, Big Bad Love is a mess, but it's a sincere mess, beautifully shot by Paul Ryan and faithfully adapted by screenwriter James Howard.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There's something overly studied, almost clinical, in how it all pulls together.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Ray remains an unanswered, not especially compelling, question, but Mr. Keaton comes close to making you believe there’s soul to go with the fries and freneticism.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like, you know, genius. But, like, you know, why?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Roger Nygards’ sweet, gently funny documentary about the wild and woolly fans of all things Star Trek doesn’t really reveal much about the original landmark series and its various spinoffs, nor does it ever really get to the heart of the shows’ enduring appeal.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There's no defense for movies like these, but neither do they warrant apology; they're irresistibly watchable, like car wrecks.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Although too compressed by half, the film manages to recreate what, at one point, the hectoring narrator will call an "archaeology of repression."
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Race is raised as a possible reason for Idris’s and Seun’s problems, and then other potential determinants (a learning disorder, illness) are introduced. But the filmmakers don’t engage with these life events and issues: They just line them up as if their significance were transparent.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Sometimes a movie's charm materializes where you least expect it and in this particular case it emerges in the unlikely form of Henderson's character, Scotland Yard detective Janet Losey.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A sui generis excursion into sex and race that is by turns terrible...and close to divine.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There’s nothing wrong with Mr. Redford and his love of nature. But there’s something irritatingly softheaded about the generic, nostalgia-tinged blandishments that the film finally resorts to -- a Wendell Berry poem, a grizzled old farmer wielding a sickle -- in place of truly hard questions and solutions that may effect meaningful change. With the polar ice caps melting, I want more than poetry and blame. I want a plan.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The actors certainly look as if they’re having a good time, and if you’re in the right mood, you might too.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The movie keeps you watching and generally engaged.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Though Edward and Bella reach certain heights in Twilight, notably during a charming scene that finds them leaping from piney treetop to treetop against the spectacular wilderness backdrop, the story’s moral undertow keeps dragging them down.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Water Lilies is a nice, watchable, attractive, minor work. What it lacks is a sense of purpose, a commitment not just to its characters but also to its own reason for being.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The camera movements are graceful, almost ethereal, yet the objects themselves - with their impastos of organic and inorganic materials, their metaphoric resonances, historical allusions and intimations of war - feel unmistakably weighty.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The actors in Notes on a Scandal are equally distinguished: Ms. Dench and Ms. Blanchett are among the finest on the market today, and each can deliver expert performances, even when, as is the case here, their roles are false and hollow. The performers sell the goods, but the goods are cheap.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The film is neither about the Holocaust nor about those Germans who grappled with its legacy: it's about making the audience feel good about a historical catastrophe that grows fainter with each new tasteful interpolation.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's no surprise that Imamura has directed the best film in September 11, which is doubtless why the producer saved it for last.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    All too predictably, as if obeying some rule of genre, the director trades in his more involved ideas about alienation and voyeurism for an eruption of violence, then tags on some nonsense about marital fidelity.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The film is imperfect, periodically if unsurprisingly sentimental, overly tidy and often very moving.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Michell whips the camera around too much and cuts into his scenes too quickly, but he pumps juice into this thin story and, together with his performers, keeps a movie going that might otherwise crash-land.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The bigger and truer stars of this enjoyable, sometimes accidentally entertaining movie are the five horses that take turns playing Secretariat.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Ritchie tends to flaunt his wares like a store clerk, fawning over the clothes, chairs and cars, and his usual rabbity pace slows to a tortoiselike crawl whenever the actors deliver a lot of words, which gratefully isn’t often. His talent, as he proves repeatedly, is making bodies and cars crash through space.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The partying is as bland as any all-purpose music video and feels more like another script signpost (and audience-pandering) than a serious attempt to get out what it means to be young, black, gifted, fabulously wealthy and much desired. Mr. Gray does far better when the story edges into heavier, more dappled realms.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Even as Ms. Hall’s performance makes you believe that something profound is at stake, the movie noncommittally nibbles at the edge of larger meaning, nodding at current events.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Demands to be seen, if only for its beauty.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Even at his shakiest, Mr. Blomkamp holds your attention with stories about characters banding together to emerge from a hell not of their own making, a liberation journey that just isn’t the same old, same old when a director was born in South Africa.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It’s tough being a hitmaker who isn’t weighed down by corporate expectations, but for a while, Mr. Gunn does a pretty good job of keeping the whole thing reasonably fizzy, starting with an opener that winks at the audience with big bangs and slapstick.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Spectacularly grotesque and literally nauseating, even for this usually intrepid moviegoer, In My Skin is among the more disturbing films in this blood-drenched cinematic season.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There’s a lot in this story about victimization and agency that Mr. Epstein and Mr. Friedman never satisfactorily address. It’s perhaps inevitable that they seem happier when nothing yet feels at stake, including during the production of “Deep Throat.”
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    In Search of a Midnight Kiss has its derivative moments along with awkward patches -- the inelegantly shaped climax tries to force uninteresting parallels between the two central couples -- it manages the difficult task of creating a sustained, plausible and inviting world.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Mekas makes little attempt to smooth out his transitions between takes or scenes, which only reinforces the intensely personal, even handmade nature of the work.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The Reckoning isn't great by any means and there are moments during the final stretch when it isn't even good. But for its first hour or so, the story moves at a steady clip, generating enough mystery to keep you guessing and enough atmosphere to keep you interested.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Loving Jackie Chan has always been easy, which is why it would be nice if he could find better material in which to bask in his long-sought American stardom or, alternately, ease into bad movies as effortlessly as his co-star.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Despite its spasms of brutality and a swerve into the macabre, After the Apocalypse is, by comparison with more recent films of this type (the "Mad Max" series), gentle at heart and terribly sincere.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The stilted and awkward physical and vocal performances in combination with the visually flat cinematography bring to mind the look, sound and visual texture of American daytime soaps, an association that perversely makes the movie more and more watchable.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Even when they don't always add up, these are movies in which De Niro can shrug off the burden of being Robert De Niro. Where the star who was Travis Bickle can again freely assume the part of the great character actor -- if only this time to ask, "You laughin' at me?"
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    As demented and entertaining as promised, and a little less idiotic than feared.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Sandler smirks a good deal less than he did in his last two movies, and with a couple of acting lessons, he might develop into a screen presence.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Director Tony Kaye may be reaching for opera, but screenwriter David McKenna has set his sights distinctly lower.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Only when Jodie Foster materializes midstory, delivering a beautiful, pocket-size performance as the mistress of one of the condemned men, does the film spring to life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A coming-of-adulthood story that improbably blends a plaintive drama with romantic longing and far-out science fiction.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Has the makings of a great documentary, but a subject as complex as this demands greater rigor, deeper intelligence and a sense of dialectics.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Silberling has made a movie that's far rougher in texture and tone than Mr. Handler's books, but while he doesn't have the author's sense of whimsy (or irony) he manages to construct a pleasantly watchable entertainment in all the spaces in the story not laid siege to by Mr. Carrey.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    While it’s a visual enchantment (there’s a knockout compendium of horror film clichés), its reversion to a largely male domain after “Brave,” its first and only female-driven story, is a drag.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A portrait of dispossession so acute that it's caused a few critics to cry, Let her eat cake!
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There’s much to admire in Nocturnal Animals, including Mr. Ford’s ambition, but too often it feels like the work of an observant student.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    To transcend cliché, movies like Narc need the passion of a heretic who can take stock characters with their stock predicaments and turn them inside out, the way Curtis Hanson and Quentin Tarantino do. Blood, guts and flash aren't enough.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    On a purely visual level, it's the most powerful and viscerally exciting movie to come out of Hollywood this year. Which doesn't mean that it's all good.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    At its strongest, Gone Girl plays like a queasily, at times gleefully, funny horror movie about a modern marriage, one that has disintegrated partly because of spiraling downward mobility and lost privilege. Yet, as sometimes happens in Mr. Fincher’s work, dread descends like winter shadows, darkening the movie’s tone and visuals until it’s snuffed out all the light, air and nuance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    “Skull Island” has momentum, polish and behemoths that slither and thunder. The sets and creature designs are often beautifully filigreed, but the larger picture remains murky.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Although that's enough plot for two movies, Niccol proceeds to clog up his meticulously mounted story with a murder and a romance (hence Uma Thurman), allowing needless intrigue to distract from his ideas.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Lighter than a meringue and as insubstantial, the French boulevard comedy The Women on the 6th Floor was designed for the gentle laughter it easily earns.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It’s all handsomely managed, polished and professional, but the pieces are too neatly manufactured to feel as if anything is truly at stake.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The body has its needs, and one of the problems with Diary of the Dead is that it doesn’t get into your body; it doesn’t shake you up, jolt you, make you shiver and squeak. It’s clever, or at least clever enough to keep you going and interested from start to finish. It just isn’t scary.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Minor whimsy of a film.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like all good B-movies, Returner comes loaded with enough eccentric touches to give the recycling a whiff of freshness and, as is often the case with many above-par follies, it's the cast that takes the whole thing to another level.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    However nifty, Lee's Cubist gambit fails to capture the graphic tension that makes great comic-book art jump off the page and great pop movies jump off the screen with pow, zap and wow!
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A would-be psychological thriller with next to no psychology and shivers instead of thrills, The Page Turner is a nervous-making, lightly amusing vengeance story that owes an obvious debt to Claude Chabrol.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The workmanlike title The Bank Job is a nice fit for this wham-bam caper flick.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Whatever the case, you may not buy his happy endings, but it's a seductive ideal when all of God's creatures, great and small, buxom and blond, exist in such harmony.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Anchored by Ms. Watts’s sympathetic performance, it humanizes the woman behind the smile, the helmet hair and the myth.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The on-screen results are weird and watchable, by turns frustrating and entertaining, and predictably a little morbid.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's a colorful patchwork of family high and low points, schoolboy days, professional triumphs and assorted epiphanies (including sex with women followed by sex with men).
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The director, Iciar Bollain, who wrote the screenplay with Alicia Luna, invests Antonio with humanity, which would be more impressive if she had paid more attention to exploring the darker recesses of Pilar's inner life.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Though the car chases have grown more banal as the franchise has started to run on fumes, the smackdowns have retained their zing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Jersey Boys is a strange movie, and it’s a Clint Eastwood enterprise, both reasons to see it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A blast into the past, but as with many nostalgic trips it's also shrouded in mist. The awkward, almost embarrassed way in which director Paul Justman, as well as writers Walter Dallas and Ntozake Shange, deal with race is unfortunate, as is the tendency toward overstatement.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like his character, Mr. Boseman is the star of this show, while Mr. Gad is the second banana and often comic relief. Both performers are natural showmen who never step on each other’s moment; they’re fun to watch.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Gibney, who enters swinging and keeps on swinging, comes across as less interested in understanding Scientology than in exposing its secrets, which makes for a lively and watchable documentary if not an especially enlightening one.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    [A] touching love story and soggy family melodrama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It reminds you that today’s horror movies still owe a great debt to Val Lewton, the producer of cheapie classics like “Cat People” (1942) and a virtuoso of shadows who realized that audiences could be entertained if the characters they watched looked like them. “Unfriended” doesn’t have Lewton’s poetry. Yet the filmmakers understand that one way into an audience’s head and nervous system is to fill the screen with the kind of “insipidly normal characters” (as the critic Manny Farber described Lewton’s) you’re happy to see shiver and scream.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Calvaire is pompous, but not without talent or shivers.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    High Fidelity wants to be hip, but it's comically square.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The movie is funny without being much good; mostly, it’s another rung on Ms. McCarthy’s big ladder up. It’s a fitful amalgam of bouncy and slack laughs mixed in with some blasts of pure physical comedy and loads of yammering heads. There isn’t much filmmaking in it, outside of Ms. McCarthy’s precision comedic timing and natural screen presence.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The documentary, directed by Jeremy Coon and Tim Skousen, revisits those tender years and what came after with a lot of obvious enthusiasm and not an ounce of critical distance, as if they too were just two more friends playing along.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Packs a lot of good information, witty visual aids and expert testimonials into its fast 96 minutes, and all the bad eating certainly makes for compelling if at times repugnant viewing. But the film ends up too short and, as a consequence, frustratingly glib.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Ceylan performs this particular operation with rigorous solemnity, technical virtuosity and precision tools — his lapidary visual style rises to the challenge of the natural environment — yet there’s something missing from the very start, namely the spark of breathed-in life.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Streisand hasn't been called on to deliver an immortal or even interesting performance, but she is a pip to watch.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Reasonably enjoyable until its guys are forced to grow up. Because bad behavior is usually more fun to watch than good, the movie is especially fine during the preliminaries.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The fight is the thing in Man of Tai Chi, Keanu Reeves’s down-and-dirty and generally diverting directing debut.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    As is often the case with movies of this type, the real stars are the special-effects team, which does some admirably disgusting work.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Robbins has made a drastically different film from the one Welles envisioned -- it's wacky where Welles is absurd, cynical where Welles is canny.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    While it flickers with grace and imagination during its initial half, largely because of Jack, it devolves into a dreary, platitudinous therapy movie in its second, largely because of Ma.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Lockout, is as dopey an entertainment as imaginable, but it's also a reminder that the film's star, Guy Pearce, has always had great screen magnetism, to which he has now added a bedrock of muscle. Also: he can act.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A sufficiently entertaining, adamantly old-fashioned adaptation that follows the play’s general outline without ever rising to the passionate intensity of its star-cross’d crazy kids.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The most interesting thing about The Good Shepherd is how hard the filmmakers work not only to demystify the agency, but also to strip it of its allure, its heat.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like so many political films of this type made for British television, this documentary contains more information than analysis, not to mention predictably spooky music.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Equal parts appealing and appalling innocence, with a spark of anarchic menace, Mr. Galifianakis is good enough to make you almost forget the movie.
    • The New York Times
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Some of what happens feels real, a lot doesn't, but even when the screenplay groans with clichés, the four lead actresses play their parts with truckloads of heart.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Balagueró is so overtaken by his villain that he becomes like César, displaying an eagerness to play the role of tormentor, which kills both the movie's pleasure and its flickering political subtext.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The British comic turned actor (Paul Kaye) appears in almost every scene and he carries that weight admirably. He manages the very neat trick of keeping you interested in a character who doesn't merit our affection but earns it nonetheless.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. MacDonald’s ability to notch up dread moment by moment — with a rustle of leaves, the snap of a twig — is all the more impressive given that it takes a while to warm up to the two souls he cuts loose in those woods.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The film is consummately professional but phlegmatic, a slow fizzle.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    A comedy without a shred of obvious filmmaking and an endless stream of good, bad, sometimes terrible, often absurd jokes.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    It could be worse, and would be without Bette Midler or Marisa Tomei.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Whatever the case, it's dispiriting that the draggiest, soppiest scenes in Hall Pass, as well as the most disgusting gag, involve women.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    With modest resources, some nice digital camerawork and an appealing cast - the likable Ms. Jones draws you in easily - Mr. Shapiro keeps you engaged even when his story falters.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    It is a depressing story, certainly, as well as moving, confusing and, at a fast 72 minutes, at once undercooked and overpadded.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    A strong filmmaking voice was clearly not called for in an entertainment that has been carefully calibrated for maximum blandness. Mr. Apted is aboard to keep the franchise sailing along or at least afloat, which he does.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The cinematic equivalent of a Brazilian wax, the movie omits much of the story’s most interesting material to create something that’s been smoothly denatured.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The overall vibe is morbidly entertaining, though something of a downer, partly because it's unclear if Mr. and Mrs. Pugach know that they are such sick puppies, partly because it's unclear if Mr. Klores cares that they are.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    A mainstream, eager-to-please, relatively generic endeavor, not an auteurist showcase.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Drama/Mex means to say something about its country of origin, though it’s hard to know exactly what.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Though seriously miscast as an unreformed alcoholic, the bronzed Ms. Paltrow gets by with a thin, serviceable voice (she sings her own songs) and an actor's confidence.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    As Mr. Philibert continues to pop in and out of different studios, in and out of the building, flitting from one face to the other, it feels as if he were searching for a story that never emerges.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Black Book works only if you take it for the pulpiest of fiction, not a historical gloss, its stated claims to "true events" notwithstanding.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    For every few jokes that hit in this story about a recession-battered New York couple finding themselves on a Georgia commune, one sputters and dies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    There's not much more to this adaptation of the Nick Hornby novel than charm -- effortless, pleasurable, featherweight charm.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    It's no great surprise that the best part of The Anniversary Party is the acting, even if Leigh and Cumming don't always direct themselves as well as they do some of their co-stars.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Has many of the virtues of a faithful screen adaptation and many of the predictable flaws.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Everything in Matchstick Men moves and looks right, from John Mathieson's cinematography to Tom Foden's production design, so it's puzzling that the film fizzles rather than fizzes.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Alas, Mr. Fabian, directing his first feature-length fiction film, uses a club whenever a feather would do. He also mishandles the actors, in particular Mr. Neill and Ms. Okonedo, both of whom have been incomparably better elsewhere.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    As the genre machinery chugs along, the bang-bang begins to overwhelm the movie, and the underlying critique gives way to a what-me-worry shrug.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    As the movie lurches along by fits and starts, toggling between the little Nantucket room and the great watery world, it becomes apparent that the filmmakers have no idea how to reconcile not just two parallel stories but also the past and our contemporary age.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Arthur and Vortigern mix it up amid a lot of shenanigans, detours and filler, some bad, some good and all of it disposable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Pitt is himself a supernova luminary, of course, and part of the attraction of this film is how his celebrity feeds into that of his character, adding shadings to what is, finally, an overconceptualized if under-intellectualized endeavor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The 3-D is necessary to the film only in so far as it keeps your eyes engaged when your mind starts to wander. Stripped of much of the original poem’s language, its cadences, deep history and context, this film version of Beowulf doesn’t offer much beyond 3-D oohs and ahs, sword clanging and a nicely conceived dragon, which probably explains why Mr. Zemeckis and his collaborators have tried to sex it up with Ms. Jolie, among other comic-book flourishes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Mainstream moviemaking, with its commercial directives and slavish attachment to narrative codes isn't particularly hospitable to ambiguity...which may help explain why Mr. Shanley's film feels caught between two mediums and why Ms. Streep appears to be in a Gothic horror thriller while everyone else looks and sounds closer to life or at least dramatic realism.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Neither here nor there, the film is “Elf” without the goofy jokes, Will Ferrell or heart, “Bad Santa” without the smut, Billy Bob Thornton or spleen.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Olsen and the more persuasive Mr. Isaac may generate heat, but their performances and the filmmaking lack the frenzy that might explain how these two crazy kids turned into murderous fiends.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Nasty, brutish and as cuddly as a crusty old sock fished out of a sewer, the beaver or the beav, as I like to think of him, owns the film.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    If Mr. Cruise doesn't work in Valkyrie, it's partly because he's too modern, too American and way too Tom Cruise to make sense in the role, but also because what passes for movie realism keeps changing, sometimes faster than even a star can change his brand.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Largely a conventional, wan affair, despite its art-cinema flourishes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Despite Mr. Shannon and Mr. Spacey, who appear to be having a fine time working off each other, the meeting is anticlimactic.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    It's a soulless and dull bit of showmanship, but it sure sounds profound.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    A lot here is genially entertaining, but it doesn't make for interesting or vital filmmaking, because while Levinson might honestly prefer rye, he makes movies the way Wonder Bread bakes.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The shaky comedy My Super Ex-Girlfriend must have been a dream to pitch: "Fatal Attraction" meets "Wonder Woman," but funny.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Svankmajer’s provocations skew toward the intellectual and the shivery rather than the pop and the visceral, and at his best, he doesn’t just get under your skin, but also deep in your head, too. Here, unfortunately, he does neither, despite some marvelous stop-motion animated sequences involving a literal moveable feast of severed animal tongues, loose eyeballs and errant brains.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    A handsome-looking film about the writer and his unripe inspirations, the actor Johnny Depp neither soars nor crashes, but moseys forward with vague purpose and actorly restraint.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    (Hayek's) performance is far from a disgrace, but it lacks gravitas and soul, a sense of passionate purpose, a hint of obsession. The best Hayek can do with her lovely face is cloud it with worry, but the face of Frida Kahlo demands anguish.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    It’s a film that wants to play as if it were ripped from today’s headlines, but has been shredded into near incoherence.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    A deeply conventional story about truculent or orphaned boys and the gentle soul who finds himself by shaping the tots into a chorus.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Sporadically funny, casually sexist, blithely racist and about as visually sophisticated as a parking-garage surveillance video.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    What at first came across as a tale of dawning conscience increasingly starts to feel rigged.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    It's disconcerting to watch Sweetness, tiny and light-skinned, assaulting Latonya, large and dark-skinned, partly because it bluntly if inconclusively underscores a crucial color divide that runs through this film like a throbbing vein.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The sweetheart leads, Josh Zuckerman and Amanda Crew, are easy to spend time with, and Seth Green as an Amish hipster and Clark Duke as an unlikely lady-killer hit every sweet-and-sardonic note with panache.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Its mood is so muffled and point so submerged, it's difficult to see why Mr. Reeves and the rest of the cast pooled their talents to make a movie about a nowhere man going no place in particular in Buffalo.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    For much of the movie, Junn is a one-dimensional grump who pulls this schematic if unfocused movie down with each frown and harrumph.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    In the new film, it's personal tragedy that provokes the journey, not social upheaval or even scientific curiosity -- which, predictably, makes for a story that's at once more familiar and less interesting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Scott's ravishing visual style, characterized by a fetishistic attention to surface detail and unrelenting beauty, can work wonders with big subjects, but this is also a director who needs actors powerful enough to shoulder narrative and emotional extremes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    That Mr. Posin and Mr. McDuffie have stacked the deck against Nikki would be more irritating if Ms. Bening didn’t immediately make this woman come so satisfyingly alive, breathing believable vitality and at times contradictory emotions into what might have otherwise registered as a blur or cliché.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Its cast aside, Last Knights proves as square and blandly manly as an old “Prince Valiant” comic strip. Mr. Owen’s hairdo and the faint smile edging his lips are more fetching than anything about Val, and the movie’s violence is more explicit than in most vintage comics, but “Knights” also works by combining narrative simplicity with moral certitude and appealing graphics.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    On viewing, the cuts seem negligible, but what is new and clearly improved is the sound, which now booms with each door slam and gunshot.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Trying to parse meaning in "Mia" is secondary to its main point, which is its look, created with 500,000 hand-drawn frames. That's impressive in an age in which most mainstream animation is done with computers.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    In essence, this is a string of intermittently interesting, occasionally funny, periodically wacky if rarely disturbing, sometimes touching though fairly boring and poorly shot human-interest stories.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    One problem is that while Mr. Masset-Depasse frames Tania's status in vague political terms, he doesn't make an argument. Instead he creates heroes and villains in what is, by turns, a prison flick, a psychological thriller and a maternal melodrama.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The clubby, predictably self-amused comedy from Joel and Ethan Coen, has a tricky plot, visual style, er, to burn, but so little heart as to warrant a Jarvik 8.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The city doesn’t need to be real in a romantic movie, but the feelings must be. Although Mr. Levin tends to embrace clichés and overstatement (Brian’s parents, Arlene and Sam, played by Glenn Close and Frank Langella, are straight out of Yiddish vaudeville), he can also surprise you with delicate touches, a pained look, a wince of recognition.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Overly familiar industrial product, a big-budgeted entertainment defined by its putatively big concept (apes rule), an underwritten script and a few flashes of Burton's visual genius and gently askew worldview.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The cretins rule in Alpha Dog, which has much the same entertainment value you get from watching monkeys fling scat at one another in a zoo or reading the latest issue of Star magazine. Of course a little of that nasty stuff may land on you, but such are the perils of voyeurism.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    What’s missing here is the sting of revelation, something less comforting than the story’s melodramatic turns and more worthy of Ms. Winstead’s performance, which is as natural as life.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    When a filmmaker proves as reluctant as Mr. Ávila to speak up about the past, to engage with its full complexity, it can be hard to hear what he's saying.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The best that the good doctor (Murphy) can do, encumbered as he is by Larry Levin's screenplay and its low joke quotient, is discipline the dog, lay into the lizard and shtick it to the bear.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Green Street Hooligans, an accidental advertisement for Alcoholics Anonymous and the somnolent pleasures of cricket that, in the end, is mostly about the pleasures, both visceral and visual, of violence.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Moodysson has never met a pleasure he didn’t want to punish.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    While there’s much to admire in how Mr. Tucci and Ms. Eve perform Mr. LaBute’s artful, apocalyptic duet, this is one seriously out-of-date tune.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Probably the best way to experience Warcraft, a generally amusing and sometimes visually arresting absurdity, is stoned. If watching the big screen through a cannabis cloud isn’t your idea of a good movie time, though, I suggest that you do what I did and just go with the incoherent flow.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Less scary than creepy, The Grudge may have lost some oomph in the translation from Japanese to English, and the desire for a PG-13 rating probably muted the violence and perhaps the scares.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The film's start-and-go rhythm can be as maddening as the characters' amorality and sheer wallowing stupidity, but Clark has an uncanny talent for putting atmosphere on celluloid.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Sander has turned mediocrity into the triumph of the smug.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Farrell and Mr. Doyle continue to hold your gaze, even as Mr. Jordan's screenplay sets your mind to wandering. There is, as noted, a wisp of a tale tucked into this film, one that, as the story wears on, becomes ponderously weighed down with melodramatic filler and even some halfhearted genre action.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    As a director, Bigelow knows how to get out of the house, but she can be impatient when it comes to humdrum reality. That may account for her interest in Shreve's novel, with its epic tragedies, and it may help to explain the misguided casting of Penn and Hurley, each of whom comes equipped with an oversized personality.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    A serviceable, watchable movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    A flashy, nasty, on-and-off funny and assaultive sendup of the film industry.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Turturro’s musical choices in Fading Gigolo tend to feel, like so much here, generically applied instead of meaningfully coaxed from some essential, lived-in truth.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    By turns unnerving and numbing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    There's something poignant about the image of this actress (Pfeiffer) sitting in a pool of sunlight without a smile or trace of visible makeup. But she's trying to reach a character that her director seems intent to keep from her grasp.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    There’s nothing surprising in Spectre, the 24th “official” title in the series, which is presumably as planned. Much as the perfect is the enemy of good, originality is often the enemy of the global box office.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    It was a hellish encounter, as well as a portent of the 10 years to come, and as such deserves far better than Mel Gibson's glower and writer-director Randall Wallace's guns-and-Moses platitudes.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Things happen in Wanted, but no one cares. You could call that nihilism, but even nihilism requires commitment of a kind and this, by contrast, is a movie built on indifference.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    What keeps the film's fragile realism intact are actors who can make even small moments count.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The man (Bay) just wears you out and wears you down, so much so that it’s easy to pretend that you’re not ingesting 2 hours and 30 minutes of warmongering along with all that dumb fun.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The loggerhead turtle is a threatened species, and one day all we may have left are its computer-generated analogues. Its fight for existence is plenty dramatic already, and is a story worth telling honestly.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    At once overstuffed with interviews and intellectually underdeveloped, the movie charts the area’s music industry and what is lyrically if elusively called the Muscle Shoals sound.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Roosevelt was one of the towering figures of the 20th century, but he and his accomplishments scarcely register in this amorphous, bafflingly aimless movie. The story hinges, increasingly to its detriment, on Daisy, a distant cousin to Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    While Concussion has some fine things going for it, notably science and Will Smith, it lacks the exciting, committed filmmaking that rises to the level of its outrageous topic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    The plot hinges on Jenna's horrified realization that her adult self is a witch, but 13 Going On 30 -- works foremost as a vehicle for its rising star.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Tykwer may want meaning to go with his special effects, but the problem with his filmmaking, both here and earlier, is that he's more interested in his own bag of tricks than in actually saying something.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Ben Affleck has packed on the pounds, slipped on some tights and given this exasperating film far more than it gives in return.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Given how little creative wiggle room there is in properties like The Winter Soldier, it’s a minor triumph that the Russos imprint any personality on the movie, which is less a stand-alone work than a part of an ever-expanding multimedia enterprise.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Die Another Day is only intermittently entertaining but it's hard not to be a sucker for its charms, or perhaps it's just impossible not to feel nostalgia for movies you grew up with.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    It tells us everything most of us know already, including the fact that politicians lie, journalists fail and youth flounders. Mostly it tells us that Mr. Redford feels really bad about the state of things. Welcome to the club.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    While Paul seems great conceptually, he's not particularly interesting or surprising.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Ironclad alternately feels, plays and sounds like an abridged television mini-series and a feature-length video game.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Krauss might have served his material better if he had pulled the curtain back in The Kill Team, if only to explain why a movie that initially seems to be about one thing — as its shocker title suggests — is a partisan portrait of Specialist Winfield and his family.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Fur is a folly, though not a dishonorable one.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Consistently watchable, even when it drifts into dullness because Mr. Singh always gives you something to look at,
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    While watching Werner Herzog’s My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done you might be tempted to murmur, “My Werner, My Werner, What Have Ye Done.”
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Part of the draw of these movies is that they don’t create beauty, but instead borrow the emotions of the beauty they depict. (This, more or less, is one definition of kitsch, courtesy of the philosopher Tomas Kulka.) That makes the movies easy to watch and easy to forget.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Thou shalt not covet any thing that is thy neighbor's. Maybe DreamWorks should stop trying to be Disney.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    A movie that's nearly as good as its publicity campaign.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Manohla Dargis
    Apparently started out as just another soft-core item, or what the Japanese call a pink film, but evolved into something more ambitious, sort of. Certainly it doesn’t look or play out like the typical American pay-TV fodder.

Top Trailers