Manohla Dargis

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For 1,758 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 45% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Manohla Dargis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Last Days
Lowest review score: 0 Slackers
Score distribution:
1758 movie reviews
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    To his credit, Mr. Hood's meditation on truth and reconciliation doesn't traffic in the cheap thrills of art-house exploitation, like "City of God"; he wrings tears with sincerity, not cynicism.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Crammed with friendly, sympathetic talking heads and pretty images of a stunned-looking Mr. Bruce, then 35, relearning life (he remembers how to walk but forgot family and friends), the film comes up frustratingly short when it comes to the particulars.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Glibly funny and eager to please.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    While Slither sometimes feels like a monster-mash, what makes it work is how nimbly it slaloms from yucks to yuks, slip-sliding from horror to comedy and back again on its gore-slicked foundation.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The director Yan-Ting Yuen revisits the country's recent past to explore the history and legacy of one of the strangest byproducts of totalitarian madness: the revolutionary spectacular.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Principally a work of gorgeous surfaces, shot mostly in silvery black-and-white film by the cinematographer Mott Hupfel, with an occasional splash of saturated color.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    In his smart, timely documentary about the G.I. Movement, Sir! No Sir!, Mr. Zeiger takes a look at how the movement changed and occasionally even rocked the military from the ground troops on up.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Although its leisurely pace might be a bit tough going for restless Westerners, Mongolian Ping Pong is the kind of film that should rightly be seen by children, not just adventurous adults.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Its focus is purposely narrow. But that narrow focus, along with the lack of fully realized characters, and the absence of any historical or political context, raises the question of why, notwithstanding the usual (if shaky) commercial imperative, this particular movie was made.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A delicately funny tale about everyday surrealism.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The cast of The Proposition is reason enough to see the film.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    [Mr. Resler] turns out to be not only the heart of this particular game, but also its brains, lungs and unforgettably endearing mug.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Tells the depressing, often ridiculous and generally enraging story of how and why Mr. Chong, an extremely laid-back and genial camera presence, ended up doing time in the minimum-security Taft Correctional Institution in Taft, Calif.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Jayasundara studied film in France and has probably watched his share of classic European art cinema. Although his influences may originate closer to home (in interviews he has name dropped the venerated Sri Lankan auteur Lester James Peries), his use of landscape to convey states of mind suggests that he has more than a passing acquaintance with the work of Michelangelo Antonioni.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Rotoscoping makes certain sense for a film about cognitive dissonance and alternative realities, though both the vocal and gestural performances by Mr. Reeves, Mr. Harrelson and, in particular, the wonderful Mr. Downey make me wish that we were watching them in live action.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    An icy-cool study of violence both mediated and horribly real.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Allen's invocation of the "Thin Man" films in an interview makes sense, even if he’s no William Powell and Ms. Johansson is certainly no Myrna Loy. Scoop was made by someone who understands that what makes the "Thin Man" series enduring isn't whodunit and why, but the way Nick and Nora look at each other as they sip their martinis, Asta nipping at their heels.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    What they give us is the chance to win, not with righteous morality, but with an old-fashioned swagger that says, much like the film itself, Hey, we may be stupid, but we rock.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Furiously paced, with excellent performances by Forest Whitaker as Amin and James McAvoy as the foolish Scotsman who becomes the leader's personal physician, the film has texture, if not depth and enough intelligence to almost persuade you that it actually has something of note to say.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    An ode to the joy and sweet release of sex, the film manages to be a sincere, modest political venture that finds humor where you might least expect it, notably in a ménage à trois featuring a cheeky rendition of "The Star Spangled Banner."
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    While compromised by the uplift and affirmation that mainstream animation regurgitates like a mommy penguin, it also shows a remarkable persistence of vision. Even in a story about singing-and-dancing fat and feather, Mr. Miller can’t help but go dark and deep.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Doesn’t add anything substantively new, though it has been nicely directed by Neil Armfield, known in his country for his theater work, and features striking performances from Heath Ledger and Geoffrey Rush.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Whether through craft or constitution, Mr. Norton invests Walter with a petty cruelty that makes his character’s emotional thaw and Kitty’s predicament all the more poignant.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's the same old bootstraps story, an American dream artfully told, skillfully sold. To that calculated end, the filmmaking is seamless, unadorned, transparent, the better to serve Mr. Smith's warm expressiveness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    In Freedom Writers Hilary Swank uses neediness to fine effect in a film with a strong emotional tug and smartly laid foundation.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Notes on Marie Menken shines a quavering if welcome ray of light on a largely forgotten figure in the American avant-garde film scene of the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Avenue Montaigne is a bonbon, not a bouillabaisse. But because this is finally a film about desire, it carries a bittersweet tang.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The overall effect is part BBC-style biography, part Hollywood-like hagiography, and generally pleasing and often moving, even when the story wobbles off the historical rails or becomes bogged down in dopey romance.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This maximalist approach can tax the nerves, though it has the benefit of keeping you on alert. It’s also pretty enjoyable. Mr. Fuqua, who happens to be surprisingly good with actors, does have a knack for chaos.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A fine and, on a scene-by-scene basis, often better than fine, if effectively unadventurous work.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's funny ha-ha but firmly in touch with its downer side, which means it's also funny in a kind of existential way.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The screenwriters, Daniel Pyne and Glenn Gers, hit the customary thriller notes with a touch of humor, and the director, Gregory Hoblit (who worked similar terrain in "Primal Fear"), arranges those notes into a catchy, insistent rhythm.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    As a music document and as a labor of unabashed love, the nonfiction feature Gypsy Caravan could hardly be better; as a movie, it could stand some improvement.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Absorbing if unsettling documentary.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Straight-up ridiculous, but it's also consistently funny and nicely played by a well-complemented cast that finds its collective groove and never misses a beat.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Bruce Willis is ready to earn our love again by performing the same lovably violent, meathead tricks as before.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Vaporous and chilled to freezing, Interview lacks a single honest moment, but it does have plenty of diverting ones.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Horny is as horny does in the sweetly absurd high school comedy Superbad.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Something wicked this way comes in the nifty horror film The Last Winter, crawling through the hallways and howling into the dread night.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    One lesson of Lake of Fire is the galvanizing power of the visual image. Sometimes a picture is worth a thousand words, and sometimes pictures are not enough.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Greatness hovers just outside American Gangster, knocking, angling to be let in.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    In this film Mr. Coppola blurs dreams and everyday life and suggests that through visual and narrative experimentation he has begun the search for new ways of making meaning, new holy places for him and for us. He may not have found them yet, but, then, he’s just waking up.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Woody Allen’s latest excursion to the dark side of human nature, is good enough that you may wonder why he doesn’t just stop making comedies once and for all.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The film is not a beautiful object or a memorable cultural one, and yet it charms, however awkwardly. Ms. Swank’s ardent sincerity and naked emotionalism dovetail nicely with Mr. LaGravenese’s melodramatic excesses.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The film is more funny ha-ha than LOL; it’s a smarty-pants satire that mocks and embraces almost every cliché in the biography playbook.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Wry and tender and delicately melancholic, Woman on the Beach shows a newly confident filmmaker again working near the top of his form after the disappointing “Tale of Cinema” (2005), even if the new film unfolds straightforwardly, with none of the narrative ellipses and puzzle-box complications, the flashbacks and parallel story lines of his earlier work.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The film demands engagement and a kind of surrender, a willingness to enter into a work shaped by correlation, metaphor and metonymy, by beautiful images and fragments of ideas, a work that locates the music in the twitching of a dog’s ears, in the curve of a woman’s belly, a child’s song and an adult’s reverie.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Kolirin, it emerges, is wrenching comedy out of intense melancholia.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Blind Mountain is a reminder that art sometimes keeps the truth alive far better than the news.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It’s easy to laugh at Street Kings for its bigger than big emotions, its preposterously kinky narrative turns and overwrought jawing and yowling, but there’s no doubt that it also keeps you watching, really watching, all the way to the end.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A big, provocative and -- it goes without saying -- disturbing work, though what makes it most provocative is that its greatest ambitions are for its own visual style.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A likable, lightly sticky valentine to childhood, the 1980s and the dawning of movie love, Son of Rambow was written and directed by Garth Jennings and produced by Nick Goldsmith, the duo behind the underappreciated fantasy "The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy."
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Although at times Mr. Gens veers dangerously close to the unpardonable, with images that evoke the Holocaust too strongly, Frontier(s) finally works because its shivers are as plausible as they are outrageous.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Hancock makes for one unexpectedly satisfying and kinky addition to Hollywood's superhero chronicles. Touching and odd, laden with genuine twists and grounded by three appealing lead performances.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's possible that two actors other than Samantha Morton and Jason Patric might do justice to Cecilia Miniucchi's story about two badly matched Santa Monica, Calif., parking enforcement officers who stumble and grope into a relationship. But it's hard to think of a better match for the stubborn idiosyncrasies of Ms. Miniucchi's visual style and worldview than these two.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A testament to movie love at its most devout, cinematic spectacle at its most extreme, and kitsch as an act of aesthetic communion.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Although Vicky Cristina trips along winningly, carried by the beauty of its locations and stars -- and all the gauzy romanticism those enchanted places and people imply -- it reverberates with implacable melancholy, a sense of loss.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Stories of lost crowns lend themselves to drama, but not necessarily audience-pleasing entertainments, which may explain why Frost/Nixon registers as such a soothing, agreeably amusing experience, more palliative than purgative.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Uplifting, disheartening, inspiring, enraging -- the mind reels while watching the documentary Pray the Devil Back to Hell, even as the eyes water, the temples pound and the body trembles.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    In the end, what gives me reluctant pause about this bright, cheery, hard-to-resist movie is that its joyfulness feels more like a filmmaker's calculation than an honest cry from the heart about the human spirit (or, better yet, a moral tale).
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A pleasantly immersive, beautifully animated, occasionally sleepy tale.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There’s something irresistible about watching two people fall in love, even in contrived, sniffle- and sometimes gag-inducing films like Last Chance Harvey.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A fitfully funny comedy.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Up
    Passages of glorious imagination are invariably matched by stock characters and banal story choices.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This veteran Spanish director has, in his latest, created both a tribute to an art form and a performance archive.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    What keeps the movie from tipping into full-blown exploitation like "City of God," which turns third-world misery into art-house thrills, is Mr. Fukunaga's sincerity. What keeps you watching is his superb eye.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Despite such floundering, Lymelife keeps you hooked, mostly through Mr. Hutton, Mr. Baldwin and Kieran Culkin as Scott's older brother, Jimmy.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Time and again the movie stops short before it really gets started, as with the debates over the big business of organic food.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    An agreeable if slight, vaguely sketched character study times two.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    What Flame & Citron has are decent men taking down Nazis (always a crowd pleaser) and some appealing actors — notably Mr. Lindhardt, Mr. Mikkelsen and Christian Berkel as the head of the Copenhagen Gestapo.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    In this attractive, smart-enough, finally un-brave movie Ms. Barthes peeks at the dark comedy of the soul only to beat a quick, pre-emptive retreat.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The jokes do wear thin, and the setup does too, but it’s nonetheless worth noting what a couple of crafty thieves can do with elbow grease, some spare change and the kind of deep movie love that never dies.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Like most of his movies, Capitalism is a tragedy disguised as a comedy; it’s also an entertainment.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This entertaining, glib movie is about the maintenance of a brand that Ms. Wintour has brilliantly cultivated since she assumed her place at the top of the editorial masthead in 1988 and which the documentary’s director, R. J. Cutler, has helped polish with a take so flattering he might as well work there.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    From the ample evidence, Mr. Harris’s own life in public was a bust. Ms. Timoner sees him as a cautionary tale as well as a visionary.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Generally absorbing if sometimes fog-inducing.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Likable, lightweight, absurdist comedy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Stuffed with playful character actors and carpeted with wall-to-wall tunes, the film makes for easy viewing and easier listening.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It’s a full three-ring affair, complete with puffs of smoke, glitter and grunge, some hocus-pocus, mumbo jumbo and even a dwarf.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Home is, as with so many family stories, also something of a disaster movie: the walls shudder and crack, and eventually so do the people inside them.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Despite the filmmakers’ efforts to persuade us that The Young Victoria is a serious work, and despite some tense moments and gunfire, the movie’s pleasures are as light as its story. No matter. Albert may never rip Victoria’s bodice, but he does eventually loosen it, to her delight and ours.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Sweet and slight and often charming coming-of-age tale.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The film can be described as a character study or a fictionalized slice of terribly real life. Mostly, though, it is an inquiry into the mysteries of other people.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It’s pleasurable nonsense and another reminder that one of the great pulls of cinema is the spectacle of other bodies in blissful motion.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Given the stakes, it’s hard not to wish that Mr. Gandini had been more ambitious: at 85 minutes, Videocracy can only scratch the surface. Even so, after watching it, you realize that even a cursory look at Mr. Berlusconi is crucial to understanding an age in which celebrity is now the coin of the realm.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    One of the pleasures of this intelligent, rigorously thoughtful, somewhat sly film is that it takes place in the space between the inexplicable (no explanation is possible) and the unexplained (enlightenment might be around the corner).
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A tale about appearances in which not everything is as it seems, Easier With Practice tries to use phone sex as a way to explore contemporary alienation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Only ends up skimming the surface. But even the skimming is largely interesting and thought-provoking, and of course very bleak.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A modestly scaled, quietly effective independent movie about a struggling single mother and her two children.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Moretz is by far the best thing about the film: she holds the screen as gracefully as she executes a running back flip.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A charming, uncritical, often entertaining jumble, the documentary was written and directed by Leslie Zemeckis.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Few American filmmakers create female characters as realistically funny, attractively imperfect and flat-out annoying as does Ms. Holofcener, whose features include “Friends With Money” and “Lovely & Amazing.”
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    My guess is that after years of being the trick pony, he wanted to see what it was like to be the ringmaster.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    But while the Pietà imagery startles, it makes increasing sense as the story builds around it. Because as Hideaway deepens and evolves, you understand that the image of Mousse cradling Louis is a manifestation of her love: this was how she held him, with a tender love that in its depth was itself holy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Alfredson directed the second movie as well, and his work is again essentially functional, limited to clumsy action sequences and television-ready conversations. He doesn't prettify the violence in either movie, which might be unintentional but makes them feel more honest than the first did.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Certainly the fictionalized brood in All Good Things is equal to the Friedmans in terms of dysfunction, and they're loaded.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Those swayed by the argument in Client 9 that some of the rich and powerful whom Mr. Spitzer crusaded against might have exploited his stupidity should find all this enthralling. Others might just remember the hubris.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A small movie with a full heart, Undertow takes an old idea - the loving, lingering ghost - and gives it reverberant, resuscitated life.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    That film does have its attractions, notably in its two solid leads and standout support from Mr. Pearce.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Tiny Furniture is at times more pleasurable to think about than it is to watch, more of a conceptual coup than an enjoyable experience.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's the kind of outrageous, excessive flourish that can make Mr. Scott's work so enjoyable in the moment. He doesn't do much, but with a handful of appealing actors in tow, he sure keeps that machine going.
    • The New York Times
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The Illusionist is both a modest homage to its writer and a melancholy look at a lost world.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A lovely drift of a movie, Go Go Tales commands your attention even as it lulls you along. Conspicuously inspired by John Cassavetes's "Killing of a Chinese Bookie," among other touchstones, it is a sincere and inspired meditation on art and creation, but in a loose, funny key.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's impossible not to cry at their suffering, but whether you'll feel anything is another story.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Despite its A-movie aspirations, as the chases continue and the plot holes widen, Unknown quickly settles into the familiar B-movie comfort zone.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This is the kind of cornball entertainment that rainy afternoons were made for. Throw in a cozy sofa too. Beastly will size down well on your television.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There are modest pleasures in a familiar story told differently enough that you're happy to keep guessing and watching.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    In crucial ways, Source Code, written by Ben Ripley, recalls "Moon," Mr. Jones's accomplished feature debut about a solitary astronaut played by Sam Rockwell. Source Code is bigger, shinier, pricier.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The French director Bertrand Tavernier deploys some smart ideas in this film, a period story about wars on the battlefield and those closer to home, but there's something a bit goatish in his attention to some female charms.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    With its spy-on-spy globetrotting, old-fashioned villains, flirty but prematurely swinging minis and fan-boy bits (look for an eye-blink-fast tribute to "Basic Instinct" and a cameo from the cult actor Michael Ironside), the whole enterprise has an agreeable lightness, no small thing, given its rapidly moving parts.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    As is sometimes the case with movies that take on civil and political rights without force-feeding the audience,A Better Life" plays the human interest angle hard. It tries to put a lump in your throat and a tear on your cheek (it succeeds), pumping your emotions doubtless in an attempt to look nonpartisan.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A solid yet fleet French thriller about a society kidnapping and its shockwaves.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The pleasures of Ms. Breillat's work are its commitment and seriousness and its raw, sometimes very funny perversity: she's lets everything hang out, without apologies.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The results are about as naughty as that sounds (not very), but it also makes for a fairly giggling good time.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There's a story, in case you're looking for one, though it's almost an afterthought, just the thin glue holding everything together, including the fine cast, the sense of broody place and the fatalism that seems to come with it. Mostly there's Mr. McDonagh's playful, sometimes overly cute language, which serves the actors and also threatens to upstage them.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's good, canny-dumb fun.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Kwanten, meanwhile, best known for playing the sweet, dim Jason Stackhouse on the HBO show "True Blood," gives Griff the delicate, ethereal affect of a man who's an alien in his own world except when he's running down an alley in a disguise. He's a pleasure to watch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Nannerl, the subject of at least three novels also titled "Mozart's Sister," is in this film meant to be something more than a chapter in her brother's biography though it's not exactly clear what. Somewhat frustratingly if reasonably, Mr. Féret never settles on whether she was a genius, a martyr, a feminist cause, a disappointed daughter, a resigned woman or all of the above.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Maggio's strengths here are his people (not their stories), a sense of intimacy and textured place rather than the generic hoops he forces the characters to jump through.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Although there's more romance in "Buck," a classic American survivor story in the triumphant individual vein, in Pianomania the very dry, very accomplished Mr. Knüpfer makes engaging company both because he keeps enviable company and because he's a full-on geek, though one possessed by pianos.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The story that emerges is programmatic and largely unsurprising, but these children give it messiness, joy and life.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The latest and best of the movies about a girl, her vampire and their impossible, ridiculously appealing - yes, I surrendered - love story.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A sun-scorched noir, Rampart tells a familiar story with such visual punch and hustling energy that it comes close to feeling like a new kind of movie, though it's more just a tough gloss on American crime stories past.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Not everything is as elegantly executed, including a tiresome, would-be comic subplot involving an African diplomat and a clandestine casino that drags the story down badly and comes close to noxious racial stereotype.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Gets back to action basics with globe-trotting, nifty gadgets, high-flying stunts and less loquacious villainy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Both Ms. Marjanovic and Mr. Kostic are very fine (like the rest of the cast they deliver their dialogue in Bosnian) and they navigate the contradictions of their characters' feelings, the flashes of hate, the surrender to desire, with delicacy.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Less gore is more here, and what a relief. The Woman in Black isn't especially scary, but it keeps you on edge, and without the usual vivisectionist imagery.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    An elegant, elegiac found-footage work from Bill Morrison, best known for his silent-film reverie "Decasia."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Essentially and very effectively a rollicking smash-and-crash chase movie that happens to be surprisingly well acted.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. DeHaan, whose vulnerability and physical awkwardness here can evoke the young Leonardo DiCaprio in "What's Eating Gilbert Grape," is invaluable. Mr. Russell and Mr. Jordan are as likable as their characters, but it's Mr. DeHaan who pulls you uneasily in.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The monster that creeps into the satisfyingly shivery horror film Intruders doesn't just hide under the bed, it also lurks in dark corners, including those dimmed by your own imagination.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Hit So Hard is the touching story of how and why Ms. Schemel ended up in her own private hell and how and why she made her way out again into the world of sunshine, sobriety and puppy dogs.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Spiked with energy and attitude, the nonfiction movie Fightville takes a fast look at a few men who, for pleasure and sometimes profit, like to smack and take down other men while practicing mixed martial arts.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A smart, effectively unsettling movie about the need to believe and the hard, cruel arts of persuasion.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    An appealing, largely upbeat documentary about young ballet dancers duking it out.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There's nothing obscure about young love and loss, and a story, as Mr. Jiménez put it, about "youngsters who have to deal with this sudden lack of certainties which makes them more lonely than they could have ever imagined."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Although Mr. Pawlikowski often shows Mr. Hawke in medium and long shots, the actor draws you close. There's anguish in Tom's face that speaks of a terrible fragility and that leavens the story's mysterioso proceedings with a real, recognizable humanity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The tussling between Elinor and Merida is familiar, but while the mother-daughter clashes may make the story "relatable," they drain it of its mythopoetic potential, turning what could have been a cool postmodern fairy tale into another family melodrama.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Extremely likable and has value as a historical document specifically because it includes snippets from a dozen later-life interviews with Photo League members like Rosalie Gwathmey and Mr. Engel.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It's impossible to know from the movie whether Mr. Geyrhalter believes this paradise needs protecting or whether something in his words - irony, fury, laughter - was lost in translation.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    While Celeste and Jesse is decidedly conventional in most respects, it's pretty swell as an exploration of a relationship between a man and a woman that's no longer predicated by mutual desire.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Matthiesen has a way of consistently and gently upending expectations, sometimes with humor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The movie should be manna for anyone who likes animated fantasias without wisecracks, commercials and overwrought warbling about self-actualization, meaning that it's suitable for those who will grow up either to be the next Tim Burton or simply to enjoy his movies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A muscular, maddening exploitation movie embellished with art-house style and anchored by solid performances.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Dizzily enjoyable documentary.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Johnson throws a lot at the screen, blasted corpses included, yet little here is as initially transfixing as Mr. Gordon-Levitt's mug.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Meta to the max, filled with clever jokes and observations that stick like barbs and deflated ones that land with a thud, Seven Psychopaths is a leisurely riff about movies, violence, storytelling and the art of the steal.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There's an ugly, jittery beauty to Pusher, a very fine British redo of a 1996 Danish movie of the same title.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Schadenfreude carries a delectable tang no matter the language, and as the history of Hollywood shows, stories about pretty people behaving badly remain reliably alluring.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Measured in tone and outraged in its argument, it is an emotionally stirring, at times crushingly depressing cinematic call to witness. It's also frustrating because while it re-examines the assault on the jogger and painstakingly walks you through what happened to the teenagers - from their arrest through their absolution - it fails to add anything substantively new.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A diverting neo-noir, Deadfall brings to mind those dark, old-fashioned entertainments in rotation on Turner Classic Movies that suck you in with their genre machinery, sullen beauties and despair.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    If Mr. Tippet and Ms. Mims weren't such accomplished visual stylists, you might even think that the teenagers shot the documentary themselves, which explains both its appeal and its limitations.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Hughes visual choices can feel borrowed and clichéd, but his regard for beauty often compensates for his blunders, as does the sturdy, reliable appeal of another story of good and evil, men and women, light and dark, glass and steel, sex and power. As it turns out, there are eight million and one stories in the naked city.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Warm Bodies is an improbable romance sweetened with appealing performances and buoyed by one of the better cute meets in recent romantic comedy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There’s an elemental, almost primitive quality to the Tavianis’ condensing that, at its most effective, dovetails with the prison’s severely circumscribed material reality, as if the high walls, barred windows and suffocating rooms were manifestations of the characters’ states of mind.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There’s not much new under the moon here, which makes what the writer and director Richard LaGravenese does with the story all the more notable.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Silver’s ability to translate the liminal into cinematic terms, to catch those moments between innocence and knowing, childhood and adulthood, unforgiving and forgiving, makes her someone to watch.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It doesn’t aspire to art-house significance, just to white-knuckled entertainment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Kormakur sets and keeps up a fast rather than frantic pace that never runs the movie off the rails even when the story nearly does.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Damon’s performance helps keep the movie from sinking under the weight of its artfully constructed horrors.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Rahimi opens up an entire world inside the couple’s modest house, filling its few rooms with enough air, sharp words and slow-boiling intrigue that the walls never feel as if they’re closing in on you.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Even as the gathering melodramatic storms threaten to swamp this pungent slice of life, Mr. Cretton manages to earn your tears honestly.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The director, John Crowley, handles Steve Knight’s snaky script capably, introducing the characters, their backgrounds and the political stakes in bold strokes.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    There’s one man alone, stranded on a seemingly desolate distant planet with only his wits, his fists and his voice-over. That voice-over is mercifully spare, the landscape atmospherically barren and the action nice and tight.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    [Mr.Tillman] does lovely work here, particularly with the actors, even if his insistent ebullience can feel like a sales pitch.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Peirce plays up the story’s religious themes and Carrie’s burgeoning power as she discovers her telekinetic gifts, even as the dread of the female body that deepens Mr. De Palma’s version somehow goes missing.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Catching Fire isn’t a great work of art but it’s a competent, at times exciting movie and it does something that better, more artistically notable movies often fail to do: It speaks to its moment in time.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Blissfully unconventional as a documentary and as an intellectual endeavor, Is the Man Who Is Tall Happy? won’t tell you everything you’ve always wanted to know about Mr. Chomsky, but its modesty is one of its strengths, along with Mr. Gondry’s entrancing, vibrant illustrations.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    What gives this movie its sting is that, despite Mr. Mordaunt’s insistent attempts at uplift, death hovers over this story at every single moment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A competently made, moderately diverting variation on a genre standard.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Hirokazu never overly explains his stories through the dialogue, preferring to tease out their meaning visually.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This isn’t, it turns out, the usual once upon a time, but a story about the unknowns that can swallow us up.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Non-Stop doesn’t make any sense, but that’s expected, uninteresting and incidental to the pleasures of a slow-season Liam Neeson release as diverting as this one.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It would be something to see Mr. Bateman go authentically dark (perhaps not that dark), but it’s also enough just to watch him as he widens his eyes, furrows his brow and shows off his excellent timing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    You’re unlikely to turn away. The problem with aesthetic shocks is that their power can drain off and their original effects become harder to replicate, so we’ll just have to see what happens next.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Tavernier’s filmmaking here is loose, almost casual, and you may not always notice what he’s doing with the camera as he frames the ministry’s choreographed chaos with its whirling people and parts.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The film, which [Mr. Maloof] directed with Charlie Siskel, is absorbing, touching and satisfyingly enjoyable because Maier was a fascinating, poignant and somewhat enigmatic woman.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Eska’s choices are thoughtful if sometimes studied: the movie is well cast with solid performers, and if the handsome digital images look overly sharp, as if outlined in razor, he consistently makes the most of his limited resources.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Transcendence is a dark, lurchingly entertaining pastiche of age-old worries, future-shock jolts, hot-button topics and old-fashioned genre thrills.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The Argentine writer and director Lucía Puenzo, shooting in wide screen, takes an effective, largely low-key approach to her fictionalization of Mengele’s time in South America.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The weave of the personal and the political finally proves as irresistible as it is moving, partly because it has been drawn from extraordinary life.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    In Edge of Tomorrow, Mr. Liman brings Mr. Cruise’s smile out of semiretirement and also gives him the kind of physical challenges at which he so brilliantly excels.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Kill or be killed isn’t the official tag line of The Purge: Anarchy, but it fits. It would also make a more suitable title for this satisfyingly creepy, blunt, down-and-dirty thriller, one of those follow-ups that improves on the original.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Buoyed by Ms. Johansson’s presence, Mr. Besson keeps his entertainment machine purring. He may be a hack, but he’s also a reliable entertainer.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The limitations of Calvary are summed up by the insistent, dialectical chatter that almost mechanically pings and pongs between lightness and darkness, glibness and seriousness, insincerity and honesty, faithfulness and despair.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A portrait of the artist as a refusenik, a recluse, a survivor and a stubborn question mark, “Fifi Howls From Happiness” registers, by turns, as a celebration, an excavation and an increasingly urgent rescue mission.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Like its predecessor, The Trip to Italy flirts with seriousness yet invariably, perhaps rightly, it always goes for the joke, the pun, the fun and the sun.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A soulful romance, an existential action flick and something of a miracle movie — the appealing slow-burner Salvo hovers at the crossroads of genre.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Nasty, brutal and unforgiving, A Walk Among the Tombstones is one of those rare contemporary cinematic offerings: intelligent pulp.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Ridley’s ambitions and refusal to treat Hendrix as a solvable mystery are welcome, given how often biopics re-embalm their subjects. Here, a legend is born, and a man too.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The visual choices in the movie, including all the close-ups of Gary’s face as it lightens and darkens, help create the sense that something deeply personal is at stake.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The script for Mockingjay Part 1, credited to Peter Craig and Danny Strong, gets the job done, but the performers matter far more than the words they deliver.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Even as Ms. Amirpour draws heavily from various bodies of work with vampirelike hunger, she gives her influences new life by channeling them through other cultural forms, including her chador-cloaked vampire.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Hawke serves as both the narrator and the story’s ballast amid all the woo-woo interludes and disruptions, the puzzle piece you hold and worry about even as the scenery changes and identities shift.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Szifron creates inhabited worlds with comic timing and visual flair, but you can hear him chortling as he shovels his people into the grinder.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    What cuts through the filmmaking clutter are the young women and men who share their accounts of abuse by both their attackers and their schools.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This is, it’s worth remembering, a movie set in the American West that was shot in South Africa by a Danish director with a Danish star. In other words it’s another dream of America, feverish, lovely and absurd.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Cymbeline has been branded a tragedy, a tragicomedy and a romance, and Mr. Almereyda embraces all three categories. The movie is by turns grim, grimly amusing and romantic, sometimes at once.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    it can be a strategically off-putting movie yet one that also steals under your skin scene by scene and through Ms. Schnoeink’s slowly revealing performance as an ill-fated heroine turned future biographical footnote.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A divertingly eccentric, often comically absurd movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Camus sets the movie’s initial course, but Mr. Oelhoffen resolutely steers it home with political context, historical hindsight, an unambiguous moral imperative and a pair of well-matched performances; put another way, he makes the story his own.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    For long stretches, The D Train serves as a commodious vehicle for Mr. Black, who, like the best comic performers, never seems remotely concerned about going too big or risking the audience’s love. He’s a showboat if every so often, more of a steamroller, capable of flattening everyone and everything in his way. Yet he is also adept at conveying emotional and psychological fragility.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    An often electric, bracingly urgent documentary.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It’s a kick to see how effectively Ms. Phang has created the future on a shoestring even if she hasn’t yet figured out how to turn all her smart ideas into a fully realized feature.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The good news is that the minions are more (unconsciously, if perhaps also strategically) in touch with their anarchic side than the typical onesie-wearing crusader, which suits the directors Pierre Coffin and Kyle Balda’s well-tuned sense of the absurd.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    While its subject means that "Listen to Me” is easy to like, Mr. Riley’s shaping of Brando’s words can make the movie, every so often, difficult to fully embrace.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Sleek and bloated, specific and generic, “Rogue Nation” is pretty much like most of the “Impossible” movies in that it’s an immense machine that Mr. McQuarrie, after tinkering and oiling, has cranked up again and set humming with twists and turns, global trotting and gadgets, a crack supporting cast and a hard-working star.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It’s an extremely well-lubricated entertainment machine filled with attractive images and wall-to-wall appealing performances.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Waterston, a Modigliani in motion and often in black, easily holds your attention, but it is Ms. Moss, with her intimate expressivity, who annihilates you from first tear to last crushing laugh.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The director M. Night Shyamalan has a fine eye and a nice, natural way with actors, and he has a talent for gently rap-rap-rapping on your nerves.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Berg has created an unnerving, sometimes infuriating documentary. She makes smart choices throughout as she weaves together this chronicle of faith and abuse.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    A buoyantly funny, sometimes desperately sad film.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Brocka likes to go big and blunt, but in Insiang, he does his strongest work when he delivers his politics quietly.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    At first luxurious blush it’s a jet-setting marital melodrama, one of those he-said, she-said (and wept) encounter sessions decked with designer shades, to-die-for digs and millionaire tears. More interestingly, the movie, which Ms. Jolie Pitt wrote and directed, is a knowing or at least a ticklishly amusing demonstration of celebrity and its relay of gazes from one of the most looked-at women in the world.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Part of what makes In Her Own Words so pleasurable is that it’s so insistently celebratory, despite the traumas and hurts that trickle in. To that upbeat end, it tends to soften and even elide some of the thornier passages in Bergman’s life.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Tom Hardy and Tom Hardy are the reasons to see Legend.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Fassbender gives you a reason to see this Macbeth, although the writing isn’t bad, either.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It’s no surprise that the teams hired to bring a property like Deadpool to the screen know how to keep the machine oiled and humming; it’s the ones who somehow manage to temporarily stick a wrench in the works, adding something human — a feeling instead of another quip — who are worth your attention.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Indirection can be a beautiful tool in comedy and so it is in “Hello, My Name Is Doris,” which uses this funny, outwardly ridiculous character to tell a simple story about a love that rarely speaks its name, including in movies: that of an older woman for a much younger man.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    This movie is finally only about Isabelle Huppert and Gérard Depardieu, and that’s enough.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    If the movie works as well as it does, it’s because Ms. Kusama can coax scares from shadows, silences and ricocheting looks.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Lindon’s physically reserved, inward turn as Thierry (wrinkled brow, downcast eyes) dovetails with Mr. Brizé’s restrained realism.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Affable, earnest and humanly scaled, The Meddler is the kind of entertainment that the studios used to supply by the boatload and that now tends to show up on the small screen.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Chace does his finest work with Mr. Padrón, and together director and actor create a portrayal of a man who, even as he’s stirred to action, seems increasingly burdened by his sentimental education.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Sliding into theaters on a river of slime and an endless supply of good vibes, the new, cheerfully silly Ghostbusters is that rarest of big-studio offerings — a movie that is a lot of enjoyable, disposable fun.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    It’s a persuasive portrait of a monster-to-be, one etched in thrown tantrums and rocks, and heavily supported by an excellent cast that includes Robert Pattinson and Yolande Moreau as well as a driving score that occasionally threatens to upstage the movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Hooligan Sparrow, which Ms. Wang also shot and skillfully edited, has the pulse of a mainstream thriller but without the pacifying polish and tidiness.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    If I could write sonnets, I would write one about Ms. Hahn, whose timing — she finds depths in that little pause before a joke crests — can turn laughs into howls.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    While desperation and a critique lurk under all these garish surfaces, neither emerges because Ms. Biller, finally, adores this milieu too much to tear it apart.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Despite its flaws and will to kitsch, The Lovers and the Despot has enough enigmas and chills to merit a look, even if some of its spookier moments involve cinephilia rather than the usual weapons of mass destruction.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    As a director, Ms. Zexer has a fine eye for the texture of daily life, which she fills in with resonant physical details and sweeping, scene-setting views.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    The Girl on the Train is a preposterous movie but not an unenjoyable one. If that sounds like faint praise, well, it is and it isn’t. There’s always something to be said for an entertainment that sustains its nuttiness all the way to its twisty finish.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    War may be terrible, but for a woman like Shideh there’s no horror like home.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Part of the ticklish enjoyment in The Monster is how the director, Bryan Bertino (“The Strangers”), plays with genre registers and how, after opening with disquieting stillness and an isolated child, he slowly yet surely turns up the shrieks.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    With the strange caws and showy displays, these beasties provide a lot of the movie’s easygoing pleasures. The adults are rather less engaging.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Ma paints a persuasively bleak scene that could use more psychological and philosophical nuance to go with its painstaking grimness.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Held together by the blues -- Brown's prose and Howard's performance, Big Bad Love is a mess, but it's a sincere mess, beautifully shot by Paul Ryan and faithfully adapted by screenwriter James Howard.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The film's gadgetry is pricier, but the leering is strictly the Playboy joke page circa 1967.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Brilliantly edited and gorgeously shot, Esther Kahn is a dream to look at and, courtesy of Howard Shore's minor chords and high-strung strings, definitely something to hear.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    An improvement on the original, but that isn't saying much.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A portrait of dispossession so acute that it's caused a few critics to cry, Let her eat cake!
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A sui generis excursion into sex and race that is by turns terrible...and close to divine.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Less outright terrifying than under-the-skin shivery, this psychological thriller from sui generis Japanese director Kiyoshi Kurosawa breaks nearly all the rules -- including those of narrative logic.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Exactly the sort of good bad movie that Hollywood does best -- it's big, worthless fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There's so much that's right in it that its blunders are all the more frustrating.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There's something overly studied, almost clinical, in how it all pulls together.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    This is harmless stuff, and sometimes it's actually pretty funny, too.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    In the end, neither the appealing cast -- nor the force of Scott's stunning imagery is enough to make us understand why these men died.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Robbins has made a drastically different film from the one Welles envisioned -- it's wacky where Welles is absurd, cynical where Welles is canny.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Alternately frustrating and rewarding film.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Malick dangles his maddeningly innocent ideas about life and death and man's gift for self-destruction.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Roger Nygards’ sweet, gently funny documentary about the wild and woolly fans of all things Star Trek doesn’t really reveal much about the original landmark series and its various spinoffs, nor does it ever really get to the heart of the shows’ enduring appeal.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's good -- when it's not adrift in an absence of meaning.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    High Fidelity wants to be hip, but it's comically square.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    At once a heartfelt story about a family undone by violence and an overburdened allegory of fascism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    [Proyas] hasn't yet learned how to enliven his characters as fully as his sets. Part of this is structural (somnolence is built into the script), but the greater fault lies with Proyas' direction of his performers, most of whom deliver their lines in a strangulated whisper.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Director Tony Kaye may be reaching for opera, but screenwriter David McKenna has set his sights distinctly lower.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Filled with brilliant filmmaking and features outstanding performances, but it's neither profound enough nor pop enough to be great -- it's mournful, serious, beautiful and, finally, pointless.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like, you know, genius. But, like, you know, why?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    On a purely visual level, it's the most powerful and viscerally exciting movie to come out of Hollywood this year. Which doesn't mean that it's all good.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Sandler smirks a good deal less than he did in his last two movies, and with a couple of acting lessons, he might develop into a screen presence.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The first 20 minutes of Wolfgang Petersen’s new action adventure, Air Force One, are so thrillingly choreographed (and so very, very loud), it’s all the more disappointing that the balance of the movie tends to move less like a Stealth bomber and more like a jalopy — jerking fitfully from plot hole to plot hole, only occasionally finding momentum.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Written by Vince Gilligan and directed by newcomer Dean Parisot, Home Fries is far too cute and eager to please, but Barrymore and Wilson are charming, and O'Hara is a blast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    What's most frustrating about the movie isn't that it thinks so little of its heroine that it can't let her figure out the moral of her own story, but that it thinks so little of us as to suggest that, after a couple millennia of human struggle, it's indeed possible to answer the unanswerable.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Con Air is entertaining in an extravagantly decadent sort of way. It just isn't a movie.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Although that's enough plot for two movies, Niccol proceeds to clog up his meticulously mounted story with a murder and a romance (hence Uma Thurman), allowing needless intrigue to distract from his ideas.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    This bit of fluff overflows with so much honest charm it barely matters that it's one in a seemingly endless succession of Tarzan retreads.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Although the digital dinos look great, especially the clumsy stegosaurs, Spielberg and screenwriter David Koepp have failed to absorb the single most important lesson from the movies they've looted: If your people aren't interesting, at least make your monsters memorable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Here, it's the creepily quiet stuff, the stuff that might be rushed over in a different movie -- Annie shivering alone in bed or being visited by her dead grandmother as she hangs out the wash -- that makes the film more than a generic distraction.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like oversolicitous lovers, the filmmakers are hung up on foreplay -- and not enough old-fashioned teenage raunch.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The plot doesn't rate as high as the quality of the bodies in fast, furious motion. What counts in The Transporter isn't the wafer-thin story about smugglers -- it's the way Martin kicks open a door, fends off a couple of axes and uses a perfectly ordinary sport shirt as a weapon.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Even when they don't always add up, these are movies in which De Niro can shrug off the burden of being Robert De Niro. Where the star who was Travis Bickle can again freely assume the part of the great character actor -- if only this time to ask, "You laughin' at me?"
    • 19 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There's no defense for movies like these, but neither do they warrant apology; they're irresistibly watchable, like car wrecks.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    No matter how seriously everyone works to make the CIA impossibly sexy, the illusion that these pencil pushers are incarnations of Bond, James Bond, is difficult to sustain.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Loving Jackie Chan has always been easy, which is why it would be nice if he could find better material in which to bask in his long-sought American stardom or, alternately, ease into bad movies as effortlessly as his co-star.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's too little Grier too late, but it's also fairly satisfying to watch.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    To transcend cliché, movies like Narc need the passion of a heretic who can take stock characters with their stock predicaments and turn them inside out, the way Curtis Hanson and Quentin Tarantino do. Blood, guts and flash aren't enough.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    All too predictably, as if obeying some rule of genre, the director trades in his more involved ideas about alienation and voyeurism for an eruption of violence, then tags on some nonsense about marital fidelity.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    What keeps you watching isn't the story or the actors, none of whom are at the top of their form, but the relentlessness of Friedkin's vision. The film has great forward thrust -- Friedkin's a full-throttle guy -- and the director knows where to put the camera.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    A blast into the past, but as with many nostalgic trips it's also shrouded in mist. The awkward, almost embarrassed way in which director Paul Justman, as well as writers Walter Dallas and Ntozake Shange, deal with race is unfortunate, as is the tendency toward overstatement.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    However nifty, Lee's Cubist gambit fails to capture the graphic tension that makes great comic-book art jump off the page and great pop movies jump off the screen with pow, zap and wow!
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    It's no surprise that Imamura has directed the best film in September 11, which is doubtless why the producer saved it for last.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    However caricatured a vision of female empowerment, Lara Croft exercises an irresistible tug not just on the adolescent male imagination but the 12-year-old female imagination as well.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Minor whimsy of a film.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Some of what happens feels real, a lot doesn't, but even when the screenplay groans with clichés, the four lead actresses play their parts with truckloads of heart.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Like all good B-movies, Returner comes loaded with enough eccentric touches to give the recycling a whiff of freshness and, as is often the case with many above-par follies, it's the cast that takes the whole thing to another level.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Spectacularly grotesque and literally nauseating, even for this usually intrepid moviegoer, In My Skin is among the more disturbing films in this blood-drenched cinematic season.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    For all its flaws, its obvious if irrelevant similarity to "Dead Poets Society," it lets us spend some quality time with some of the finest actresses in American film as they give energetic life to one of the most radically underrepresented minorities in Hollywood: the intelligent woman.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    There are not one, but two wars raging inside this adaptation: one between the North and the South, and another, more calamitous war between art and middlebrow entertainment.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Closer in texture and consistency to individually wrapped American cheese than good, tangy English cheddar. But even humble plastic-wrapped cheese has its virtues and so does this film.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Parigi -- who's clearly made a close study of Alfred Hitchcock's obsessions and has watched a fair share of intelligent horror perched between cheekiness and Grand Guignol (think "Re-Animator") -- succeeds nicely.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    The Reckoning isn't great by any means and there are moments during the final stretch when it isn't even good. But for its first hour or so, the story moves at a steady clip, generating enough mystery to keep you guessing and enough atmosphere to keep you interested.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Sometimes a movie's charm materializes where you least expect it and in this particular case it emerges in the unlikely form of Henderson's character, Scotland Yard detective Janet Losey.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Packs a lot of good information, witty visual aids and expert testimonials into its fast 96 minutes, and all the bad eating certainly makes for compelling if at times repugnant viewing. But the film ends up too short and, as a consequence, frustratingly glib.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Neither an atrocity nor a revelation, The Brown Bunny is a very watchable, often beautiful-looking attempt by Mr. Gallo to reproduce the kind of loosely structured mood pieces that found American and select foreign-language cinemas of the 1960's and 70's often at their most adventurous.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Diverting if heavily padded, this is the newest addition to an increasingly crowded field of political nonfiction films and certainly the easiest viewing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Manohla Dargis
    Has the makings of a great documentary, but a subject as complex as this demands greater rigor, deeper intelligence and a sense of dialectics.

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