Manohla Dargis
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For 1,590 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Manohla Dargis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 The Grandmaster
Lowest review score: 0 The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things
Score distribution:
1,590 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Inside this small canvas - almost the entire film unfolds in the one apartment - Mr. Eimbcke turns each character into an epic.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Here Mr. Cantet -- whose earlier features include "Human Resources" and "Time Out," two other dramas about systems of power -- has done that rarest of things in movies about children: He has allowed them to talk.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Reality is a story about one man’s desire to make it big on the small screen, and something of a familiar exploration of the blurring between reality and its simulations. More elliptically and more interestingly, it is also a look at an Italy engrossed with rituals and spectacle, in watching and being watched.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Moretti finds broad comedy in the antics of some clerics, who can seem as sweet as children, but in Melville there is pathos and there is tragedy, and not his alone.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Some filmmakers give us dreams and false worlds in which we can find refuge. For others, though, like the young Mexican filmmaker Carlos Reygadas, the movies aren't an escape from the world but a way more deeply into it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Tamara Jenkins’s The Savages, is a beautifully nuanced tragicomedy about two floundering souls.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    In many respects Ceausescu turns out to be as much the author of this brilliant documentary as the director, Andrei Ujica, who waded through more than 1,000 hours of filmed state propaganda, official news reports and home movies to create a cinematic tour de force that tracks the rise, reign and grim fall of its subject.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    One of the few films I've seen this year that deserves to be called art. Dark as pitch, as noir, as hate, by turns beautiful and ugly, funny and horrifying, the film is also as cracked as Mad magazine, though generally more difficult to parse.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Bill Pope's swooping, noir-inflected cinematography is wonderfully complemented by Owen Paterson's inventive production design, a great soundtrack and the best fight choreography this side of Hong Kong. And even if this isn't "Blade Runner," it is very cool shit.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Often soaringly beautiful melodrama.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Brutal, urgent, devastating -- the documentary The Devil Came on Horseback demands to be seen as soon as possible and by as many viewers as possible.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    More elegantly plotted and streamlined than the first film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    The story grips you entirely even if Ms. Denis’s worldview here finally feels like a tomb: terrifying, pitiless, inevitable.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Far more than Norman's adventure, which takes him from home to a cemetery and deep into his town's history, what pulls you in, quickening your pulse and widening your eyes, are the myriad visual enchantments - from the rich, nubby tactility of his clothes to the skull-and-bones adorning his bedroom wallpaper.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    With a visual style and a deadpan humor that owes an obvious debt to the Finnish director Aki Kaurismaki ("Drifting Clouds"), they hold their shots long enough for you to scan details, look deep into faces and think on how little (or much) it takes to be happy. Here a painted Jesus hovers on a chipped wall, but it's an unholy family of three that finds heaven on earth.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. Breillat narrates the fairy tale three ways: in the period story, through the little girls and, finally, through the overall film. None are fully satisfying, but together they offer a sharp, knowing gloss on how our stories define who we were and who we become.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    One of the strengths of Sunset Story is that it introduces us to a pair of extraordinary women who have kept their dignity and independence in a world that conspires against them having either. The story of Lucille and Irja may break your heart, but it will also make your day.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    The Saint works. The reason why it occasionally soars is Kilmer, an actor who’s happiest when burying himself in eccentric characterizations, a trick he performs repeatedly here even as he fills the screen with pure movie-star dazzle.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    The revelations keep coming in Sing Your Song and it's hard not to go googly eyed when, for a 1963 CBS special, you see Mr. Belafonte discussing the march on Washington with some fellow marchers, Mr. Poitier, Marlon Brando, James Baldwin, Charlton Heston and the film director Joseph L. Mankiewicz.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    One of the better documentaries I'd seen in years -- it plays like a suspense thriller because that's exactly what it is.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    As in many road movies, the trip becomes an occasion for philosophizing, a journey inward and out as the men joust and parry, improvising and entertaining each other, at times by imitating, hilariously, someone else (Michael Caine, Sean Connery).
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    The Host is a cautionary environmental tale about the domination of nature and the costs of human folly, and it may send chills up your spine. But only one will tickle your fancy and make you cry encore, not just uncle.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    The woman in Christopher Munch's lovely, delightfully idiosyncratic Letters From the Big Man, resplendent with its own dense forests and cloudy Oregon days, has already fallen to earth and is looking for a way back up or maybe just forward. She gets help from a sasquatch.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Has the glorious look and immaculate technique we expect from Mann, along with a wealth of superb secondary performances.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Ms. DuVernay, from start to finish in this very fine movie, works to make sure that Ruby is a woman to remember.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    It's a gift for moviegoers to have this much freedom, and exhilarating. In Holy Motors you never know where Mr. Carax will take you and you never know what, exactly, you're to do once you're there.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    A taut, unnerving, forcefully unromantic fictional film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    It's an exasperating, irresistible, must-see mess of a movie about life in the modern world and so very good that even when its story finally crashes and burns the filmmaking remains unscathed.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    The film was written, directed and somehow willed into unlikely existence by the extravagantly talented Carlos Reygadas, whose immersion in this exotic world feels so deep and true that it seems like an act of faith.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Chappelle looks and sounds alternately ebullient and weary. It was directed by Michel Gondry, the madcap genius behind "Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind," but in its tone and vibe feels like Mr. Chappelle's all the way.

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