Manohla Dargis

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For 1,720 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Manohla Dargis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Stories We Tell
Lowest review score: 0 The Heart Is Deceitful Above All Things
Score distribution:
1720 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Marks the emergence of one of the more original and promising new voices to hit the international cinema scene in recent years.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    One of the most harrowing and plausible visions of apocalypse since George A. Romero's 1968 zombie shocker, "Night of the Living Dead."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    The dread gathers and surges while the blood scarcely trickles in The Conjuring, a fantastically effective haunted-house movie.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    A true rarity, Murderous Maids is an intelligent, moral shocker.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    If Flags of Our Fathers feels so unlike most war movies and sounds so contrary to the usual political rhetoric, it is not because it affirms that war is hell, which it does with unblinking, graphic brutality. It’s because Mr. Eastwood insists, with a moral certitude that is all too rare in our movies, that we extract an unspeakable cost when we ask men to kill other men. There is never any doubt in the film that the country needed to fight this war, that it was necessary; it is the horror at such necessity that defines Flags of Our Fathers, not exultation.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    This convulsively funny movie takes an up-close and sometimes queasy-personal approach to its motormouth subject, who, when she's not making you howl with laughter (or freeze up in horror), brandishes her deeply held hurts, fears, prejudices, poor judgment and bad taste as if they were stigmata.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Godard has always made films that are as thrilling for their ideas and ideals as for the sheer beauty of their images; the difference here is that for the first time in years he's more interested in turning us on than in turning us off.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Mostly, Ernest & Celestine is an ode to the happiness that comes from being with those different from us.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    One reason filmmakers like Mr. Nolfi seem attracted to Philip K. Dick's work, beyond the brilliance of its ideas, is that his unembellished writing style leaves them room to make the stories visually their own.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Unguided by obvious story signposts, you slip from image to image, pulled along by their beauty (the digital cinematography is by Chris Dapkins) and by the dreamy, leisurely rhythms of the editing (by Seth Bomse).
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Hong is not yet the equal of Mr. Antonioni, but it has become increasingly difficult to see intellectually stimulating, aesthetically bold films like this in American theaters.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    In both its intellectual reach and the elegant simplicity of its form, A Talking Picture bears resemblance to Andrei Sokurov's "Russian Ark."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Peter and Bobby Farrelly's thoroughly enjoyable paean to Moe, Larry and Curly and the art of the eye poke.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Pi
    A triumph of low-end production design, shot in sizzling, solarized black and white, and driven by a propulsive, insinuating score, Pi is a horror movie that makes you think and an indie film that makes you squirm.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Childhood ends, this time forever, with tears and howls, swirls of smoke, the shock of mortality and bittersweet smiles in Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2, the grave, deeply satisfying final movie in the series.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    It's all terribly tortured, often laugh-out-loud, absurdly funny and, as with all of Maddin's movies, conveyed through images that are as lush and beautifully over the top as the story's emotions.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Again and again, as the story shifts between women, times and moods, Mr. Jordan adds a punctuating flourish...that exquisitely illustrates the once-upon-a-time mood.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Mr. Almereyda takes Milgram, his work and ideas seriously but doesn’t suffocate them: Despite the story’s freight, the laboratory shocks and Milgram’s insistent melancholia, Experimenter is a nimble, low-frequency high.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    It's sexy, brainy and slightly nuts.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    What tethers the movie and especially April and Teddy is how Ms. Coppola captures that exquisitely tender, moving moment between fragile, self-interested youth and tentatively more outwardly aware adulthood, a coming into consciousness that she expresses through their broken sentences, diverted glances and abrupt turns.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    The brilliance of Borat is that its comedy is as pitiless as its social satire, and as brainy.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    While the film’s desperately sad finale indicates that Philippe Garrel knows the truth of '68 better than most and might have suffered a crisis in faith in the years since, this magnificent film is itself proof that all was not lost.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    No
    Marshall McLuhan called advertising the greatest art form of the 20th century. In No, Pablo Larraín’s sly, smart, fictionalized tale about the art of the sell during a fraught period in Chilean history, advertising isn’t only an art; it’s also a way of life.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    In some sense it was beauty that saved Mr. Brannaman, that of his conscience and that of horses, which, having been tied to humans long ago, became companions, workers and for some, as this lovely movie shows, saviors.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Benoît Jacquot's tense, absorbing, pleasurably original look at three days in the life and lies of a doomed monarch.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    Va Savoir doesn't so much flow as wander, trailing off into drama one minute, slapstick the next; it tries your patience, but ever so gently, masterfully.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Manohla Dargis
    An agonizingly familiar refrain, but one that the young Argentine director Alexis Dos Santos relates with such tenderness and with so much ethereal beauty that it feels like something fresh.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Manohla Dargis
    Kitano uses exaggerated acting, choreo-graphed violence and, most radically, the rhythms of everyday life -- farmers pounding the earth, the syncopated plop of falling rain -- to turn this genre story into a crypto-Kabuki play and one blissfully idiosyncratic diversion.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Manohla Dargis
    A whirlwind of talking heads, found footage, scary statistics and cartoonish graphics, the movie is a fast, coolly incensed investigation into why people are getting fatter.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Manohla Dargis
    Turning ordinary life into movie magic is one of the most difficult, least-heralded challenges for any filmmaker. What makes Freaky Friday a charmer isn't how far-out things get for this mother and daughter, but how sweet and distinctly un-freaky a kid, her mom and their love for each other can be.

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