For 689 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Marc Mohan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Goodbye Solo
Lowest review score: 0 Cop Out
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 33 out of 689
689 movie reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    With a level-gazed approach to its milieu, empathetic but clear-eyed, Winter's Bone practically makes up for 40 years of "Deliverance"-style hillbilly cartoons.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    The acting is flawless, the world feels utterly real, and the finale accomplishes the miracle of finding in the everyday world something profound.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    Gravity isn’t as ambitious as “2001,” but then, what is? It is, however, absolutely a worthy successor, a masterpiece of hard science fiction, and the movie to beat at this point for next year’s cinematography and visual effects Oscars.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    This deadpan ode to living life to its fullest could be the ultimate crowd-pleaser at this year's PIFF.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    As an artist who can craft an ebullient postmodern pastiche but maintains links to an idiosyncratic heritage, Amirpour has instantly become one of the most exciting, globally relevant filmmakers working today. Her film is a testament both to her own creativity and the infinite elasticity of the vampire mythos.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    An alternately harrowing and poetic take on the fatal 1982 hunger strike of Irish Republican Army prisoner Bobby Sands, Hunger is also one of the most impressive feature directing debuts in years.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    The thrilling cinematic joyride that, among other improbable feats, puts Michael Keaton, as Thomson, smack in the middle of the Oscar race for best actor.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    Neither the social commentary nor the story ever overpower the other, a feat that allows this remake to stand proudly alongside the original, its equal in every way.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    Anyone who shares Ebert's love of movies and who followed his career will be exceptionally moved by Life Itself, but anyone who appreciates a well-lived life should be touched as well.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    As flawless as any film this year and rock-solid confirmation that Joel and Ethan Coen are the greatest filmmakers working in America (and perhaps anywhere else) today.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    The pacing is perfect, and the action, mostly filmed in a studio, is never less than utterly believable. The director’s first feature, “Margin Call,” was full of rapid-fire dialogue, and he shows off considerable range by following it up with this film.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    For a film that consists largely of a series of talking-head interviews, The Gatekeepers is a riveting a documentary.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    The movie, like the man, seems more interested in spreading the gospel of environmental responsibility, and in doing so it's probably the most important film of the year.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    If Young at Heart were merely a cheeky presentation of codgers belting out inappropriate tunes, it would be a curiosity and nothing more. But by getting inside the lives of a few of its members, the movie ultimately paints a moving portrait of senior citizens who believe it's better to burn out than fade away.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Mohan
    The Act of Killing is exemplary as a history lesson, a character study and a powerful argument for confronting the past.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    Prolific documentarian Alex Gibney takes a labyrinthine, detail-laden story and crafts an attention-holding film, polemical without ranting.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    When a film like Stories We Tell comes along, you're reminded how powerful and universal even the most intimate and individual lives can be when captured with intelligence and perspective.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    It's an ending that may alienate some viewers, but will jolt others out of their comfort zones and into an appreciation of genuinely brave storytelling.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    Akin is German-born but of Turkish heritage, and his films have often been concerned with the particular clashes and conflicts between those cultures. This film, though, does so in a much more oblique way than 2004's "Head-On."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    It has laser gun fights, forbidden love, and a rollicking group breakout from a fascistic old folks' home. What more could anyone want?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    [Guterson] has crafted a near-masterpiece of understated humor and empathy, demonstrating that, despite Hollywood's usual indifference, it's possible to make authentic, funny, engaging films about characters over the age of 50 who are neither grizzled hit men nor sassy grandmas.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    The halting dialogue, full of awkward pauses and restarts, seems improvised in the way that only carefully scripted material can.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    The first of von Trier's efforts to be certifiably farcical.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    At a full three hours, the movie flirts with wearing out its welcome about two-thirds through, but recovers to end up an exhausting, operatic black comedy that leaves you wanting more.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    The result is both a captivating history lesson and a tense intellectual thriller that dares to ask big questions about creativity and technology.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    This story could take place anywhere there are families struggling to remake themselves in the aftermath of tragedy; its universality is perhaps the most potent political message of all.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    Sissako, whose previous film, 2006's "Bamako," also tackled political issues with aplomb and complexity, doesn't need to craft an overwrought denunciation of ignorant fanaticism. The humanism with which he approaches both the perpetrators and the victims of the violence inherent in this petty, small-minded tyranny makes the strongest argument possible against the Boko Harams of the world.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    Upstream Color culminates in a wordless final act that is among the most transcendent passages of pure cinema in memory.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    Merchants of Doubt is an important film. It's a riveting film, a necessary film, one that every American should see.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 91 Marc Mohan
    The whole thing unfolds with sadistic precision, but Edgerton's expert manipulation makes it a fun ride nonetheless.

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