For 750 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Marc Mohan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
Lowest review score: 0 Cop Out
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 38 out of 750
750 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    The credibility of these theories ranges from faintly plausible to frankly ridiculous, but Ascher isn't interested in judging them; his movie is more about the joys of deconstruction and the special kind of obsession that movies can inspire.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    The Missing Picture feels akin to last year's great documentary, "The Act of Killing."
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    It’s possible the movie’s actually too unflinching; there are moments where your nose is dangerously close to being rubbed in this pile of emotional trauma. Then again, when you come from the same country as the Dardennes brothers, you’ve got to pull out all the stops to compete in the misery department.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    The star's innate vulnerability (and his ease with Dom's colorful but expansive vocabulary) makes the character more sympathetic than he has any right to be. And that, in turn, makes Shepard's film more entertaining than the Guy Ritchie ripoff it initially resembles.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    The octogenarian pianist Seymour Bernstein is the charming, inspirational subject of this appreciative, occasionally fawning documentary.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    The title is too cutesy and clever, but it's about the only unsubtle aspect of this poignant, humble drama that'll probably get lost amid the multiplex bombast, but shouldn't.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Digitally shot, the film looks great, and the performances ooze charisma. The biggest star, though, may be Kinshasa itself, a roiling, barely cohesive sea of humanity that seems as if it could serve as a backdrop for some fascinating films for years to come.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    As usual in Le Carre's world (and the real one), a measured, rational approach faces an uphill battle against the philistines who really run the show. That predictably weary attitude is both the best — as embodied in Hoffman's performance — and worst — in its weary predictability — things about A Most Wanted Man.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Warmhearted lesson in tolerance.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Thor meets the elevated expectations for superhero movies today, but doesn't exceed them. There's some sloppy plotting, which always shows a certain disregard for the audience's intelligence.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    When the camera glides down a pier to settle for the first time on Gatsby's face, it's a movie-star moment of the sort we don't often get anymore, and there aren't many actors who could pull off Gatsby's mixture of confident charisma and pathetic vulnerability.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    As with many Iranian films, reality and fiction collide (the lead actor really is a pizza deliveryman), and the moral of the story is a surprisingly blunt critique of the growing inequality of wealth in the slowly Westernizing nation.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Her film is just as effective as a portrait of two unknowable, individual souls caught up in events of global scale.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    A mental workout of the most invigorating sort.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    In addition to providing a fascinating, agenda-free look at an unseen way of life, the film presents a lesson that should be welcome among people of any faith or none at all.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    With less intelligence behind it, this could have easily been one of those films that seem like they were more fun to make than to watch. Instead, it's a thoroughly good time at the movies, from humble beginning to cosmic, surprise-cameo-featuring end.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    The edited footage has an intensity and immediacy you won't find on cable news networks.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Manages to excavate enough universal pathos from the mundane to find something truly extraordinary in the ordinary.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Despite familiar elements, including the classic family-versus-work conflict faced by almost every movie cop in history and the equally hoary discovery of corruption among Michel's colleagues, The Connection remains tense and believable.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    In this involving if slightly unfocused documentary, director Daniel Karslake takes a two-pronged approach in examining how religion has been interpreted -- some would say twisted -- into, at its worst, monomaniacal homophobia.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    The resulting documentary is a fascinating meditation on the different ways nature can be experienced, as well as a fatalistic take on the process of our planet's seemingly inevitable change in climate.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Consistently surprising, Seven Psychopaths ultimately plays like a combination of Quentin Tarantino's self-aware, savvy ultraviolence and Charlie Kaufman's reflexive head trips. And that potentially awkward combo goes down like a chocolate-vanilla swirl cone, only with more guns.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Even the tiny roles in this Rockwell-meets-Breughel panorama are perfectly, although almost cruelly, cast.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    To top it all off, the movie ends with one of the best covers of "I Shall Be Released" you'll hear, courtesy of gospel singer Marion Williams.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    There's something in this nostalgic, lovingly photographed film about the transition from the classical art of painting to the new art of the cinema, as embodied by one of the greatest practitioners of each. The independent-minded Andrée, who would go on to marry Jean Renoir and star in several of his early films, is presented as something more than a mere muse, if something less than a full-fledged character.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    For most of its running time, How to Make Money Selling Drugs is a cheeky, moderately interesting look behind the curtain of the trade in contraband substances, from the corner dealer to the cartel-topping drug lord.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    Land of the Dead is huge. It's Romero doing what he does best: using zombies to create a lowbrow social parable. It shows up junk like "Resident Evil: Apocalypse" for the brainless pap it is. And it's got something that even the best previous "Dead" films have lacked: good acting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    This being an Italian film, and Gianni being such a hapless, kindhearted aspiring Lothario, make this perhaps the sweetest movie ever made about a guy trying to cheat on his wife.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    It's a sad commentary on the independent film business when a proven filmmaker like Hartley has to go hat in hand to the Internet for his budget, but at least he got to make the movie on his terms. It turns out to be the best thing he's done since "Henry Fool."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Marc Mohan
    C.O.G. is probably of the most interest to Sedaris fans curious to see how the humorist’s unique tone translates to film (the answer is moderately well).

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