For 1,654 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Marc Savlov's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Ran (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 Pinocchio
Score distribution:
1,654 movie reviews
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Savlov
    It's a short, sharp, shock to the cinematic system that's virtually impossible to dislike, and if you don't leave the theatre grinning your face off, then buddy, movies just aren't for you.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Savlov
    Even though we're aware of the tragic trajectory of the singer's life, for a while it almost seems as if reality got it wrong and Curtis might just squeak past the reaper's scythe with no more than a shave and a haircut.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Savlov
    One of the 10 best films ever made, period.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Savlov
    Gilliam keeps the audience guessing, and in doing so creates a startlingly effective rumination on the nature of sanity and madness cloaked in the shroud of a sci-fi thriller.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Marc Savlov
    Such gorgeous explosions, such a terrible vision, such an amazing work of art. Go. Now.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's not necessary to be a longtime fan of the Star Trek universe to appreciate the sheer emotional punch and swagger of this rough and randy Enterprise crew.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's thrilling and lovely and sad and explosive in all the right ways, and it needs to be seen – on the big screen, in 3-D – to be believed.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Everything fits perfectly, from titles to fin, but most of all Firth, who dons the role of George like a fine bespoke suit.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Blomkamp and his entire cast and crew have created an instant genre classic that transcends the self-limiting ghetto implied by the term "science fiction" and instead, like precursors such as Robert Wise's "The Day the Earth Stood Still," engages not only the mind but the heart as well. It's magnificent.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Zombieland is dead set against being dead serious. Its tonal pallor has more in common with a foreshortened "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" than with "28 Days" or "Weeks Later," and then, again, there's that jaw-dropping cameo. It'll kill ya.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Possibly the best argument against couples therapy ever, Antichrist is a tour-de-force trip inside the mind of a dangerously depressed man. That man is Danish filmmaker von Trier, and he has gone on record as having conceived and executed Antichrist in the wake of a deep depression.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Nothing short of horror-hound heaven.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This isn't some pomo arthouse picture looking to score points by subverting the gangster paradigm; it's a killer film about killers who idolize film but are unable or unwilling to parse the doom that always crops up come Act III.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's enough to make you weep.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Like Mumbai, Slumdog pulses and throbs with raw, unadulterated life and the hope for a better Bombay, today. It's brilliant.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Could be summarized as a vampire tween romance, but that cheap and tawdry sum-up does zero justice to the magnificent emotional resonance of this gemlike bloodstone of a film.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is a dream cast for both Scorsese and the viewer, and everyone is working at the peak of their craft. Nicholson's flawless performance as the increasingly unhinged crime boss is a marvel of manic, paranoid ruination.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is Pixar's finest and most emotionally powerful film yet, and it draws on a wealth of cinematic resources that run the gamut from Chaplin's best to Buster Keaton, Jacques Tati, and even Martin and Lewis.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Be forewarned: Folman closes his film with a grisly, real-death denouement that may give you some nightmares of your own. As well it should.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Pixar's animation is simply flawless; colorful, deeply realized, and ably conveying both the chaos of the kitchen, and the sensual allure of food well prepared.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Hauntingly beautiful film.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's a masterful film, the kind you itch to see twice or more, as elliptical as a dream and as direct as the short sharp shock of lead kissing flesh.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The Host is a freewheeling mix of high style and goofy, good-natured fear-mongering.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Much has been made about the film's "humanizing" of Hitler, but he's only human here in the most prosaic of terms.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This second incarnation of the Mike Judge and Don Hertzfeldt-produced animation anthology is, if anything, even better than the first.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    If Victorian Manchester had been remotely like this, H.G. Wells never would have bothered to pen "The Time Machine" – he'd have just stepped outside and into the fray.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Honestly, this ultra-noir adaptation of Frank Miller's black-and-white cult comic series is a visual feast ripped straight from the original medium's blood-soaked pages.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Provides that rarest of documentary accomplishments: a glimpse into the artists' sunny, dark hearts.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Sauper's delicately horrific documentary is a short, sharp slap in the face of the developed world, and a long overdue one at that.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's a ripping good yarn, to boot, breathlessly paced and seamlessly edited, but most important, resoundingly and surpassingly fun.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    A sweet-natured romantic fable, albeit one that packs in carnivorous cockroaches, rampaging brontosaurs, and the ever-Freudian Empire State Building among its requisite emotional baggage. And, too, it's a corker of an action/monster movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    For those who only recall Bana from his bland showing as Ang Lee's super-thyroidial meltdown monster, his performance here is a revelation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Sophie Scholl plods along inexorably, one step after another, to its grim, sad end. It's almost unbearable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    As with all of Lee's films, there's much more going on beneath the surface than is immediately apparent.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    There's so much information and so many finely honed arguments in this ultimately joyous film that it's liable to send audiences scurrying home to their computers to download the bands they've just heard.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Park is one sick puppy, and I mean that in the very best sense of the phrase.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Cavite isn't a horror film, per se – its nightmarish sense of unreality is thoroughly grounded in the geopolitical here and now – but the emotions it conjures from the audience can be traced straight back to Shockers 101.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It ends up seeming more real and more artistically, morally, and spiritually honest than any dozen bedrock documentary films you'd care to name.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Factotum, for all its grim grind, is funny-serious, and smart-stupid. Just like you after four beers, and me after eight.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This feature-length expansion of Cohen's deliciously ridiculous character accomplishes what decades of Soviet propaganda failed to do: It points out and underscores issues of race, religious intolerance, classism, and all manner of very American social ills by giving the culprits just enough rope to hang themselves by their own petards (and then some).
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The quiet respect Venus displays toward lions in winter, defanged though they may be, is rare enough; the film's respect for unfinessed lionesses-to-be is rarer still. Wherever they're going, no one here is going quietly.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is the sort of masterpiece that will obliterate memories of lesser, later efforts in the "meeting the parents" comedy lineage. Brilliant.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The story (even more so if you weren't around in July of 1969) is gripping, eloquent, and powerful stuff, the right stuff right down to its pioneering heart, taking manifest destiny to the stars themselves.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's Cronenberg's film, but it's the actors who elevate Eastern Promises from mere thriller to some other, more disturbing plane.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    While the evil that men do to one another in this film may well be rooted in the Cain-like enabling of original sin from one doomed brother to another, the final familial tragedy feels exactly like classic Lumet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Crowe has rarely been better, and the same goes for director Scott, who parallels and then dovetails Lucas and Roberts' stories with sublime, gritty precision, working up to a magnificent "Godfather III"-style crosscutting sequence that electrifies an already explosive tale.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Cloverfield is the most intense and original creature feature I've seen in my adult moviegoing life, and that's coming from a guy who knows his Gojira from his Gamera and his Harryhausen from his Honda. Cloverfield isn't a horror film – it's a pure-blood, grade A, exultantly exhilarating monster movie.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Paranoid Park shows the Portland-based director to be working at the pinnacle of his art in every frame, in every composition. It's breathtaking, heartbreaking, tragic, gorgeous, and true all at the same time.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    12
    12 is every bit as much of a moral powerhouse as its predecessors but with the added bonus of being simultaneously intellectually riveting and, at times, almost indescribably poetic.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's the truth, unshackled and captured against all odds, and it's one of the most powerful documentary films I have ever seen, period.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The end result is an electrifying, morally complex story of the evil that men (and women) do in the name of the greater good.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Harris' thought-provoking performance art/life isn't yet over, but by film's end he's become unplugged, both literally and metaphorically.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Amreeka is anything but a depressing digression on American wartime paranoia.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's an out-of-this-world, real-life adventure for kids of all ages, budding Neil Armstrongs and Ray Bradburys alike.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    You can't help but feel conflicted watching this superb documentary about the seminal New York-based punk rock vanguard, the Ramones.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Pollock is that rare breed, a biopic that makes you want to learn more about its subject, as much as you can, as fast as you can.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    So upbeat it might as well arrive on a sunbeam.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Piglet, your time has arrived. Sooth us.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Kempner's documentary is a streamlined, gorgeous piece of work, full of revelations of time, place, and person.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's an audacious, affecting, and unexpectedly hilarious debut, and most definitely the most original film I've seen all year.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    That Aimée & Jaguar manages so well in triple duty as a wartime melodrama with a lesbian twist is remarkable.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The images this war photographer shoots are beyond awful, but there's just no looking away.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    For those willing to submit to its terrible charms, it may be the single most important debut to come out of the Americas in years.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    As fluid and intellectually stimulating as the man himself, a tragic, heartfelt take on an event some 40 years old that feels as fresh as yesterday's Times.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Seems more like a subtle, elegiac tone poem than an indictment of human banality and the evil that men do.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Like a car crash in slo-mo, it's a riveting, beautiful mess.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is what great dialogue -- and by extension great movies -- is made of.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Cooly feral in dark suit and tie, Glover’s the man in the gray flannel suit gone way, way over the edge, and it’s one of the most fully realized screen performances in ages, rats and all.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    About a Boy knows exactly what it wants to do: It wants to make you smile, and grin, and then laugh with recognition, and it manages all three, again and again.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Sellbinding, distressing, and possessed of a dark and terrible beauty.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    An antidote to holiday cheer like no other, this French tale of psychological horror is as harsh as they come -– it’s like finding a severed finger in your stocking and then finding it’s even better with hollandaise.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's a thrilling, powerful movie, and one that certain people in certain quarters may have at one time called dangerous. Some of them may yet still.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The Princess Blade opens with one of the most note-perfect action sequences ever committed to film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Absolutely unlike any documentary you’ve ever seen, Step Into Liquid nearly qualifies as a religious experience.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    By the time the explosive finale arrives (with a wistful Ray Charles crooning over shots of cataclysmic destruction, no less), you'll be hard pressed to name a recent film with this much action, pathos, and smarts.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The bulk, the heft, and the girth of Bukowski: Born Into This arrives in the form of the author himself, giving beery readings to Berkeley audiences clearly enjoying a contact high or sitting, ill-kempt but quiet, pensive, Heineken in one yellowy paw, in his apartment.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Osama begins in fear and ends in terror. In between there's all manner of hopelessness, deprivation, and death, which is to say that as the first film to come out of a post-Taliban Afghanistan, it's practically a documentary.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    That they were just hormonally blitzkrieged kids at the time, unaware of their role in history, only makes Peralta's superior doc that much more winning.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    An altogether more viscerally engaging film, from its relentless pacing and slam-bang effects work to the fine, appropriately heroic score by John Ottman. That the movie has an obvious gay subtext neither adds nor detracts from the film’s smashing popcorn appeal.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    New and amazing -- it takes you back to the days when French filmmaking and French filmmakers were the darlings and saviors of the cinematic cutting edge. It's a great film, simply told, and a pleasure to watch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    "Always be good to rock and roll and it will always be good to you," the film quotes Phil Spector as saying, and a more fitting explanation of the Bingenheimer mystique you'll likely never find.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Loud, hilarious, and enormously entertaining, 24 Hour Party People makes you want to toss current FM radio out on its pre-fab, corporate-sponsored backside. And not a moment too soon.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Audition's take on the war between the sexes is bleak and almost entirely devoid of hope. --It's enough to make you give up dating altogether.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Far from being atypical, the events of June 12 and the litany of tiny nightmares that led up to that day are brutally obvious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's a keeper, a tumultuous love story set against the backdrop of 24 hours of really, really inclement weather in the Oklahoma heartland.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    McCarthy’s film is rich in tone and subtlety, but has precious little dialogue. It feels less like a modern motion picture than some odd poem long lost and then discovered in another age, a timeless, ageless gem of hard-resined emotions melting into real life.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    While it’s perhaps not the best date film of the year, it is a grim and unmistakable masterpiece of bleak, black sorrow.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Remarkably fresh and exciting.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    One of Jordan's best films, and almost certainly in Nolte's top two percentile.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    At times poignant, joyful, and terrifying, Shawshank Redemption is an altogether brilliant movie and the debut of an equally brilliant director.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    At once emotionally charged and genuinely, disconcertingly surreal...a marvel of subdued, genuine filmmaking.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    A crazed, lovestruck, wholly original (and yet amazingly referential) beast, part pop-culture wasteland, part glowing tribute, and part wild-eyed roller coaster (of love).
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Feels brief and dreamlike. Waking from its spell, you touch your face, and it's wet, but you're smiling anyway.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Everything about this swift and gorgeous and tremendously enjoyable film is played out in a rush of staccato edits, crisp performances, and charmingly giddy subplots that coalesce into Spielberg's most purely entertaining movie in years.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Riveting, and frankly it's great fun to see Leth best the smirky von Trier five times running.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Absolutely harrowing, shocking in its sudden revelatory immediacy, and very, very well done, Black Hawk Down is one of the best depictions of the outright lunacy inherent to battle I have ever seen.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Niccol's futuristic fable is a gorgeous construct, from its cast on down to the brilliant, clinical nature of the set design that reflects a future in which even a particle of saliva can be one's undoing.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Wildly entertaining, "Shakespeare in Love" minus the Bard and the babe, but with substantive style to burn.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is nobody's idea of a happy family story, but it is a pristinely chilling depiction of familial meltdown in a post-Stalinist, Twilight Zone anti-place, the dark heart of heartlessness and mysterious parenting techniques.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    One of the most suspenseful films of all time, its wartime action setting makes it easy to forget it's also one of the most spiritually righteous. [Director's Cut]