For 1,648 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.2 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Marc Savlov's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Apocalypse Now
Lowest review score: 0 Captivity
Score distribution:
1,648 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Face/Off works like a charm right on down the line thanks to brilliant, exhilarating performances from Cage and Travolta, and the many tremendously enjoyable action set-pieces that are Woo's hallmark.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The director is unflinching in his portrayal of the horrors that occurred, and nearly all the characters, from Voight's Wright to Rhames' Mann, are wonderfully nuanced, desperately believable creations.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's a ripping good yarn, to boot, breathlessly paced and seamlessly edited, but most important, resoundingly and surpassingly fun.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    A sweet-natured romantic fable, albeit one that packs in carnivorous cockroaches, rampaging brontosaurs, and the ever-Freudian Empire State Building among its requisite emotional baggage. And, too, it's a corker of an action/monster movie.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    For those who only recall Bana from his bland showing as Ang Lee's super-thyroidial meltdown monster, his performance here is a revelation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Sophie Scholl plods along inexorably, one step after another, to its grim, sad end. It's almost unbearable.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    As with all of Lee's films, there's much more going on beneath the surface than is immediately apparent.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    There's so much information and so many finely honed arguments in this ultimately joyous film that it's liable to send audiences scurrying home to their computers to download the bands they've just heard.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Park is one sick puppy, and I mean that in the very best sense of the phrase.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Cavite isn't a horror film, per se – its nightmarish sense of unreality is thoroughly grounded in the geopolitical here and now – but the emotions it conjures from the audience can be traced straight back to Shockers 101.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It ends up seeming more real and more artistically, morally, and spiritually honest than any dozen bedrock documentary films you'd care to name.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Factotum, for all its grim grind, is funny-serious, and smart-stupid. Just like you after four beers, and me after eight.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is a dream cast for both Scorsese and the viewer, and everyone is working at the peak of their craft. Nicholson's flawless performance as the increasingly unhinged crime boss is a marvel of manic, paranoid ruination.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This feature-length expansion of Cohen's deliciously ridiculous character accomplishes what decades of Soviet propaganda failed to do: It points out and underscores issues of race, religious intolerance, classism, and all manner of very American social ills by giving the culprits just enough rope to hang themselves by their own petards (and then some).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's a masterful film, the kind you itch to see twice or more, as elliptical as a dream and as direct as the short sharp shock of lead kissing flesh.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The quiet respect Venus displays toward lions in winter, defanged though they may be, is rare enough; the film's respect for unfinessed lionesses-to-be is rarer still. Wherever they're going, no one here is going quietly.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is the sort of masterpiece that will obliterate memories of lesser, later efforts in the "meeting the parents" comedy lineage. Brilliant.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The Host is a freewheeling mix of high style and goofy, good-natured fear-mongering.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Death and the Maiden is a streamlined razor-ride of a movie: taut, riveting, and a psychological horror show that will leave nail-marks in your palms for days afterwards.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Set in some sort of post-apocalyptic Parisian deli o' the damned, this lunatic's take on the future of man is so delightfully warped that it's impossible to shake it out of your head and go get a decent night's sleep.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Greenaway and his picture-perfect cast weave so many interlacing threads into the story, and so many curious subtexts - stylistic and otherwise - that it sometimes leaves us scratching our heads in wonderment.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Pixar's animation is simply flawless; colorful, deeply realized, and ably conveying both the chaos of the kitchen, and the sensual allure of food well prepared.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's enough to make you weep.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The story (even more so if you weren't around in July of 1969) is gripping, eloquent, and powerful stuff, the right stuff right down to its pioneering heart, taking manifest destiny to the stars themselves.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's Cronenberg's film, but it's the actors who elevate Eastern Promises from mere thriller to some other, more disturbing plane.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    While the evil that men do to one another in this film may well be rooted in the Cain-like enabling of original sin from one doomed brother to another, the final familial tragedy feels exactly like classic Lumet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Crowe has rarely been better, and the same goes for director Scott, who parallels and then dovetails Lucas and Roberts' stories with sublime, gritty precision, working up to a magnificent "Godfather III"-style crosscutting sequence that electrifies an already explosive tale.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Cloverfield is the most intense and original creature feature I've seen in my adult moviegoing life, and that's coming from a guy who knows his Gojira from his Gamera and his Harryhausen from his Honda. Cloverfield isn't a horror film – it's a pure-blood, grade A, exultantly exhilarating monster movie.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Paranoid Park shows the Portland-based director to be working at the pinnacle of his art in every frame, in every composition. It's breathtaking, heartbreaking, tragic, gorgeous, and true all at the same time.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is Pixar's finest and most emotionally powerful film yet, and it draws on a wealth of cinematic resources that run the gamut from Chaplin's best to Buster Keaton, Jacques Tati, and even Martin and Lewis.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Hauntingly beautiful film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This quiet, contemplative gem of a film paints a painfully accurate portrait of familial love, loss, and healing-by-degrees among the migrant communities bordering San Antonio.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Dreamlike, disjointed, and possessed of a stunningly complex sensual and narrative poetry that may confound audiences not familiar with Chinese director Wong's defining stylistic tropes, Ashes of Time Redux is, simply, one of the most gorgeous films ever made.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Could be summarized as a vampire tween romance, but that cheap and tawdry sum-up does zero justice to the magnificent emotional resonance of this gemlike bloodstone of a film.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Like Mumbai, Slumdog pulses and throbs with raw, unadulterated life and the hope for a better Bombay, today. It's brilliant.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Be forewarned: Folman closes his film with a grisly, real-death denouement that may give you some nightmares of your own. As well it should.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This isn't some pomo arthouse picture looking to score points by subverting the gangster paradigm; it's a killer film about killers who idolize film but are unable or unwilling to parse the doom that always crops up come Act III.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    12
    12 is every bit as much of a moral powerhouse as its predecessors but with the added bonus of being simultaneously intellectually riveting and, at times, almost indescribably poetic.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Blomkamp and his entire cast and crew have created an instant genre classic that transcends the self-limiting ghetto implied by the term "science fiction" and instead, like precursors such as Robert Wise's "The Day the Earth Stood Still," engages not only the mind but the heart as well. It's magnificent.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Nothing short of horror-hound heaven.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's the truth, unshackled and captured against all odds, and it's one of the most powerful documentary films I have ever seen, period.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Zombieland is dead set against being dead serious. Its tonal pallor has more in common with a foreshortened "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" than with "28 Days" or "Weeks Later," and then, again, there's that jaw-dropping cameo. It'll kill ya.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The end result is an electrifying, morally complex story of the evil that men (and women) do in the name of the greater good.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's thrilling and lovely and sad and explosive in all the right ways, and it needs to be seen – on the big screen, in 3-D – to be believed.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Harris' thought-provoking performance art/life isn't yet over, but by film's end he's become unplugged, both literally and metaphorically.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Amreeka is anything but a depressing digression on American wartime paranoia.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Possibly the best argument against couples therapy ever, Antichrist is a tour-de-force trip inside the mind of a dangerously depressed man. That man is Danish filmmaker von Trier, and he has gone on record as having conceived and executed Antichrist in the wake of a deep depression.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Everything fits perfectly, from titles to fin, but most of all Firth, who dons the role of George like a fine bespoke suit.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Electrifying and decidedly downbeat slice of life and death in Ajami.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Terribly Happy isn't, but it is wonderfully unhinged, and a painstakingly constructed meditation on a place where good and evil meet, mate, and make sour times sublime and, dare I say it, beautiful.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's an out-of-this-world, real-life adventure for kids of all ages, budding Neil Armstrongs and Ray Bradburys alike.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's not necessary to be a longtime fan of the Star Trek universe to appreciate the sheer emotional punch and swagger of this rough and randy Enterprise crew.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The Kids are All Right, a grin-cracking great portrait of a modern American family in minor and then major crises.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The film is delicious, welcome, and entirely satisfying and, as an added bonus, far and away the best genre-fan date movie of the year.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Let Me In is by far one of the best-looking films of the year, genre or no genre. It's a nightmare, sure, but what childhood isn't?
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Amid the increasingly horrific images of daily ghetto life are moments of utterly unexpected, haunting beauty, including a reel of color film that does more to humanize an inhuman situation than anything I've ever seen.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Danny Boyle's 127 Hours is the calm, cool, and tear-your-hair-out exciting mirror image of Tony Scott's bland and formulaic "Unstoppable."
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's a "keep calm, carry on" wartime melodrama of the first order, and stiff though it may be, it is never less than brilliantly done.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Absolutely mandatory viewing for aspiring animators and filmmakers. (In terms of pacing, scoring, editing, and narrative, it's a film school unto itself.) For the rest of us, however, it's simply magic.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's something of a Tiananmen Square face-off, minus the overt politics, which makes it all the more spellbinding.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Which ultimately is what Applause is really about: applying the greasepaint of the daily mundane over the scar tissue of a damaged life, striving for a reality outside of a bottle (and off the stage) while still maintaining some semblance of what made this particular lion roar in the first place.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Banderas, taking time off from voicing kids' films and appearing in Robert Rodriguez outings, plays Ledgard with just the right amount of borderline-freaky, intensity, and Anaya is another of Almodovar's terrifically talented and shockingly beautiful female leads.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It is with immense pleasure that I can report that Disney's Muppet reboot movie is an absolute delight.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is highly personal artwork writ in a grand, towering script, and all the more intellectually and artistically legible for it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's a jaw-droppingly good performance from this pint-sized, first-time actor.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Frankenweenie is that rare film that's both kid- and adult-friendly.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Definitely not for the squeamish, Wake in Fright is calibrated for maximum psychic impact. Its madness is viral and disconcerting. Truly, you're going to want a stiff drink and a hot shower, or a noose, after visiting the Yabba.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This remarkable adaptation of the supposedly "unfilmable" novel by David Mitchell achieves near-perfection on virtually all levels.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    You can take a page from Wes Craven before he went flat and keep repeating, "It's only a movie; it's only a movie; it's only a movie." But is it?
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The balance between the slight, near-mythic narrative and the eye-wateringly beautiful cinematography (courtesy of Bradford Young), as well as the aching, spare score by Daniel Hart, create a movie that’s a more lovingly crafted tone poem than anything you’re likely to see on Texas screens this summer.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's a veritable shoo-in for an Oscar nod this year, and one of the more disturbing films to come out of a major studio in ages.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Alternating between color footage and the genius interplay of startlingly lovely sequences of Stanton singing and playing harmonica in granular black-and-white, Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction perfectly captures the essence of the man.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Gravity is a major filmmaking accomplishment, no doubt, although it would have been interesting to see how it might have played sans dialogue. Unthinkable to Hollywood, sure, but still … Kowalski and Stone’s backstories and banter are, in the end, secondary to the film’s jaw-dropping visuals.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Narco Cultura smartly and movingly focuses on the cultural cycle of violence, beginning with a young, Los Angeles-based rapper, Edgar Quintero, whose main job is penning lyrics celebrating the orgiastically violent lifestyles of the drug thugs for his band Buknas de Culiacán.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    In many ways, A Field in England is a funhouse mirror of audience expectations and something of a filmic Rorschach test.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It speaks to both the head and the heart, and it is, in myriad ways, some of the best work the legendary animator has ever created.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    What makes Under the Skin such a mind-blower has everything to do with Johansson’s chillingly unempathetic turn as the, well, whatever she is, coupled with cinematographer Daniel Landin’s disorienting, hallucinogenic visuals.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Though its reach sometimes exceeds its grasp, Tarantino has created a movie with all the gritty punch of a .44 in the belly.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    One glance at the cast should be enough of a recommendation for any film lover -- it's Winger's first time on the screen in seven years, and Howard deserves a nod or two if only for getting his wife back in front of the camera where she so clearly belongs.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's a visually stunning film. For every kid everywhere, and for every adult still a kid at heart, the dinosaurs are the thing, and here, finally, Disney does justice to our dreams.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Pure unadulterated animal fun.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    CQ
    It may not be art, but it's vastly more entertaining than anything Coppola senior has done in far too long.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's done with such a wonderfully dry style and wit that you don't mind having to stop to catch up now and again.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A disarmingly enjoyable film.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Compelling, relentless cinema.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A slam-bang, sci-fi actioner, relentlessly paced and edited, with a pounding soundtrack and some ingenious aliens courtesy of Berni Wrightson and KNB Effects.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Less a film than a lyrical, naturalistic tone poem.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Full of period locations, costumes, and one very clever Lana Turner gag, it's easy to see why Ellroy is so pleased with the film.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Unfamiliar to most these days and it goes without saying that Harris performs a great service in the eyes of history with his film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Well worth seeing if you have even the slightest interest in guns and sex and the interplay between the two (and who doesn't?), Burnt Money also has, you'll forgive the pun, style to burn.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Gleefully, goofily over-the-top.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Great fun to watch, thoughtful and timely, Thomas in Love is likely to generate some decidedly interesting post-film conversations as well.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Deeply moral, thoughtful, and amiably humorous.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Minus much of the rose-tinted nostalgia his films have occasionally engendered. There is a nostalgic tone to the film, but it's a quiet, subtle one.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's a humorous film, to be sure, but there's also a stringent vein of giddy realism to it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Above all, it's a satisfying, almost restful work, as welcome in this less-than-thrilling cinematic summer as a cool soak on a hot summer's day.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's not perfect -- Thornton's slack-jawed yokel Jacob is played a bit wide of the mark and Fonda continues to irk in some indefinable way -- but it's a revelation for longtime Raimi fans. And it's a hell of a ride too, for both Raimi fans and newcomers alike.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    This is Martin Scorsese, and in the end, it's his town, and his show.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    There's no denying it's a tragic film from start to finish, but equally undeniable is the endless stoicism displayed by the women, and Panahi's crisp, meandering direction.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A remarkable film. From its performances on down to director of photography Roger Deakins' sun-baked, dirty-ochre cinematography, the film is all of a piece.