For 1,706 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Marc Savlov's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Ran (re-release)
Lowest review score: 0 Beverly Hills Ninja
Score distribution:
1,706 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's not necessary to be a longtime fan of the Star Trek universe to appreciate the sheer emotional punch and swagger of this rough and randy Enterprise crew.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Absolutely harrowing, shocking in its sudden revelatory immediacy, and very, very well done, Black Hawk Down is one of the best depictions of the outright lunacy inherent to battle I have ever seen.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Possibly the best argument against couples therapy ever, Antichrist is a tour-de-force trip inside the mind of a dangerously depressed man. That man is Danish filmmaker von Trier, and he has gone on record as having conceived and executed Antichrist in the wake of a deep depression.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Vladimir Putin’s Russia – brutal, carnivorous, delusional, but monstrously well-evolved for crushing both spirits and lives large and small – is taken to task in this excoriating portrait of the state’s omnivorous hunger for control in a far-flung northern fishing community on the Barents Sea.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The director is unflinching in his portrayal of the horrors that occurred, and nearly all the characters, from Voight's Wright to Rhames' Mann, are wonderfully nuanced, desperately believable creations.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Hauntingly beautiful film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Everything here from costuming and production design to the note-perfect score from Edward Shearmur works in tandem to create not so much a film as a singular and joyous tribute to a vanished age when wonder only cost a nickel and played three time daily at the Bijou.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's the truth, unshackled and captured against all odds, and it's one of the most powerful documentary films I have ever seen, period.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The most original comedy from either side of the pond in years.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Snatch is nothing if not watchable: It has the insane, popcorn rhythms of a Road Runner cartoon, and for that reason alone it's a minor masterpiece.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Park is one sick puppy, and I mean that in the very best sense of the phrase.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    If Victorian Manchester had been remotely like this, H.G. Wells never would have bothered to pen "The Time Machine" – he'd have just stepped outside and into the fray.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    For those willing to submit to its terrible charms, it may be the single most important debut to come out of the Americas in years.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Don’t leave until the final credits finish rolling or you’ll miss what many are considering Kill Bill: Vol. 1’s best bit. Trust us on this one.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Wildly entertaining, "Shakespeare in Love" minus the Bard and the babe, but with substantive style to burn.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    An altogether more viscerally engaging film, from its relentless pacing and slam-bang effects work to the fine, appropriately heroic score by John Ottman. That the movie has an obvious gay subtext neither adds nor detracts from the film’s smashing popcorn appeal.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    There are so many terrific things going on in the film – rapid-fire wordplay, split-second visual gags, and some veddy, veddy British punning – that, frankly, Paddington deserves more than one viewing. Huzzah Paddington, and marmalade forever!
    • 70 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Like a car crash in slo-mo, it's a riveting, beautiful mess.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Filled with brilliant, stand-out performances.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is nobody's idea of a happy family story, but it is a pristinely chilling depiction of familial meltdown in a post-Stalinist, Twilight Zone anti-place, the dark heart of heartlessness and mysterious parenting techniques.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Amreeka is anything but a depressing digression on American wartime paranoia.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    There's so much information and so many finely honed arguments in this ultimately joyous film that it's liable to send audiences scurrying home to their computers to download the bands they've just heard.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Seems more like a subtle, elegiac tone poem than an indictment of human banality and the evil that men do.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    An antidote to holiday cheer like no other, this French tale of psychological horror is as harsh as they come -– it’s like finding a severed finger in your stocking and then finding it’s even better with hollandaise.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    So upbeat it might as well arrive on a sunbeam.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    "Always be good to rock and roll and it will always be good to you," the film quotes Phil Spector as saying, and a more fitting explanation of the Bingenheimer mystique you'll likely never find.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is highly personal artwork writ in a grand, towering script, and all the more intellectually and artistically legible for it.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    '71
    Take the politics out and you’d still have a powerhouse action film. But please, don’t take the politics out.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Narco Cultura smartly and movingly focuses on the cultural cycle of violence, beginning with a young, Los Angeles-based rapper, Edgar Quintero, whose main job is penning lyrics celebrating the orgiastically violent lifestyles of the drug thugs for his band Buknas de Culiacán.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It ends up seeming more real and more artistically, morally, and spiritually honest than any dozen bedrock documentary films you'd care to name.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The quiet respect Venus displays toward lions in winter, defanged though they may be, is rare enough; the film's respect for unfinessed lionesses-to-be is rarer still. Wherever they're going, no one here is going quietly.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    You can't help but feel conflicted watching this superb documentary about the seminal New York-based punk rock vanguard, the Ramones.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It’s a spooky, moody doozy of a debut, lensed by Director of Photography Lyle Vincent in a radiant monochrome that somehow makes even the darkness sparkle.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    That they were just hormonally blitzkrieged kids at the time, unaware of their role in history, only makes Peralta's superior doc that much more winning.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Fresh and raw like a blown-out vein, Narc takes a walking-dead, cop-flick subgenre and beats new life into it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    12
    12 is every bit as much of a moral powerhouse as its predecessors but with the added bonus of being simultaneously intellectually riveting and, at times, almost indescribably poetic.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Provides that rarest of documentary accomplishments: a glimpse into the artists' sunny, dark hearts.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This second incarnation of the Mike Judge and Don Hertzfeldt-produced animation anthology is, if anything, even better than the first.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Amid the increasingly horrific images of daily ghetto life are moments of utterly unexpected, haunting beauty, including a reel of color film that does more to humanize an inhuman situation than anything I've ever seen.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Fiercely original in every respect.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    With such a frenetic, brain-melting load of images to ponder, it's easy to forget that there are also some terrific actors at work here, not the least of whom is the amazing Vinnie Jones.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Nearly a perfect film, from its bold and epic man-vs.-nature conflict to the breathless scripting, editing, acting, and direction.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    God forbid this should ever play on an IMAX screen -- the concussive soundtrack and relentless visuals would likely strike viewers deaf and blind (but what a way to go!). Simply breathtaking.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Far from being atypical, the events of June 12 and the litany of tiny nightmares that led up to that day are brutally obvious.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Castle-Hughes and Paratene are nothing short of remarkable in their roles.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Let Me In is by far one of the best-looking films of the year, genre or no genre. It's a nightmare, sure, but what childhood isn't?
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Could be summarized as a vampire tween romance, but that cheap and tawdry sum-up does zero justice to the magnificent emotional resonance of this gemlike bloodstone of a film.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This isn't some pomo arthouse picture looking to score points by subverting the gangster paradigm; it's a killer film about killers who idolize film but are unable or unwilling to parse the doom that always crops up come Act III.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Niccol's futuristic fable is a gorgeous construct, from its cast on down to the brilliant, clinical nature of the set design that reflects a future in which even a particle of saliva can be one's undoing.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Gravity is a major filmmaking accomplishment, no doubt, although it would have been interesting to see how it might have played sans dialogue. Unthinkable to Hollywood, sure, but still … Kowalski and Stone’s backstories and banter are, in the end, secondary to the film’s jaw-dropping visuals.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Fight Club's dirty little secret is it's one of the best comedies of the decade.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's enough to make you weep.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Death and the Maiden is a streamlined razor-ride of a movie: taut, riveting, and a psychological horror show that will leave nail-marks in your palms for days afterwards.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's Cronenberg's film, but it's the actors who elevate Eastern Promises from mere thriller to some other, more disturbing plane.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Cavite isn't a horror film, per se – its nightmarish sense of unreality is thoroughly grounded in the geopolitical here and now – but the emotions it conjures from the audience can be traced straight back to Shockers 101.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Wisely, a lot like the real event. No answers are given, barely any questions are asked, and the film unfolds at a leisurely, inexorable pace that stymies the traditional filmmaking tropes of tension and release.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Dreamlike, disjointed, and possessed of a stunningly complex sensual and narrative poetry that may confound audiences not familiar with Chinese director Wong's defining stylistic tropes, Ashes of Time Redux is, simply, one of the most gorgeous films ever made.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    In many ways, A Field in England is a funhouse mirror of audience expectations and something of a filmic Rorschach test.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's an out-of-this-world, real-life adventure for kids of all ages, budding Neil Armstrongs and Ray Bradburys alike.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It's a veritable shoo-in for an Oscar nod this year, and one of the more disturbing films to come out of a major studio in ages.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Nothing short of horror-hound heaven.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Honestly, this ultra-noir adaptation of Frank Miller's black-and-white cult comic series is a visual feast ripped straight from the original medium's blood-soaked pages.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Sellbinding, distressing, and possessed of a dark and terrible beauty.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Cyberpunk meets renegade romance, à la Orwell.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    An immersion into the characters' world in toto, from the "Oh geezes" and the "Oh, yaahs" to the dark and flinty core beneath.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Pixar's animation is simply flawless; colorful, deeply realized, and ably conveying both the chaos of the kitchen, and the sensual allure of food well prepared.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Remarkably fresh and exciting.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Terribly Happy isn't, but it is wonderfully unhinged, and a painstakingly constructed meditation on a place where good and evil meet, mate, and make sour times sublime and, dare I say it, beautiful.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Alternating between color footage and the genius interplay of startlingly lovely sequences of Stanton singing and playing harmonica in granular black-and-white, Harry Dean Stanton: Partly Fiction perfectly captures the essence of the man.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    McCarthy’s film is rich in tone and subtlety, but has precious little dialogue. It feels less like a modern motion picture than some odd poem long lost and then discovered in another age, a timeless, ageless gem of hard-resined emotions melting into real life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Which ultimately is what Applause is really about: applying the greasepaint of the daily mundane over the scar tissue of a damaged life, striving for a reality outside of a bottle (and off the stage) while still maintaining some semblance of what made this particular lion roar in the first place.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is Pixar's finest and most emotionally powerful film yet, and it draws on a wealth of cinematic resources that run the gamut from Chaplin's best to Buster Keaton, Jacques Tati, and even Martin and Lewis.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    A wholly original creation, crossed with shadows and light and the everyday madness of Savannah and its remarkable citizens.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Frankenweenie is that rare film that's both kid- and adult-friendly.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The Kids are All Right, a grin-cracking great portrait of a modern American family in minor and then major crises.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    A third-act revelation will knock viewers silly and cause them to reevaluate everything that’s come before, but even without that jaw-dropping information, Moss’ film is a righteous piece of empathetic, of-the-moment documentary filmmaking.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Blomkamp and his entire cast and crew have created an instant genre classic that transcends the self-limiting ghetto implied by the term "science fiction" and instead, like precursors such as Robert Wise's "The Day the Earth Stood Still," engages not only the mind but the heart as well. It's magnificent.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The Princess Blade opens with one of the most note-perfect action sequences ever committed to film.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The images this war photographer shoots are beyond awful, but there's just no looking away.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    About a Boy knows exactly what it wants to do: It wants to make you smile, and grin, and then laugh with recognition, and it manages all three, again and again.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    It is with immense pleasure that I can report that Disney's Muppet reboot movie is an absolute delight.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is the sort of masterpiece that will obliterate memories of lesser, later efforts in the "meeting the parents" comedy lineage. Brilliant.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This is a determined, resolutely paced, and atypical samurai movie, more an epic of the heart than of the battlefield, and all the more powerful for it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Riveting, and frankly it's great fun to see Leth best the smirky von Trier five times running.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    This feature-length expansion of Cohen's deliciously ridiculous character accomplishes what decades of Soviet propaganda failed to do: It points out and underscores issues of race, religious intolerance, classism, and all manner of very American social ills by giving the culprits just enough rope to hang themselves by their own petards (and then some).
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    As riveting as a documentary can possibly be, this slim (74-minute) film is also one of the most politically aware films of the year.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Absolutely unlike any documentary you’ve ever seen, Step Into Liquid nearly qualifies as a religious experience.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    By far the most gorgeous slice of sunlit sadism so far this summer, I’m Not Scared also manages to be oddly sweet: a boy’s life, with treachery.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The story (even more so if you weren't around in July of 1969) is gripping, eloquent, and powerful stuff, the right stuff right down to its pioneering heart, taking manifest destiny to the stars themselves.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Fantasies and phantasms aside, Fincher proves himself yet again to be a better cinematic psychologist of (in-)human nature than almost any other director alive. It’s another squirmily excellent date movie from hell, courtesy of contemporary cinema’s most overt nihilist.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The hippies, the ravers, the bumbling bobbies and nonplussed locals, the mud, the rush of being in the crush, up against the barricades, torn between the need for a restroom and the need for more room, to dance, to sing, to carry on like a stark loony regardless of your faraway day job – all of this is captured by Temple's unblinking, seemingly everywhere-at-once eye.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    This is a Disney film, so there's never any real question regarding Bolt and his friends' ultimate success or failure, but the writing team of Dan Fogelman (Cars) and co-director Williams (Mulan) have concocted one of the most witty and often hilarious Disney outings in years.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    But the best way to enjoy Ong Bak is on its own gritty, low-budget level, skins, brains, and guts galore, a viscerally entertaining slice of Thai filmmaking that will leave you grinning ear to ear.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    I think it's a mess, but - and this is a major caveat - an endearing, beautiful, hopelessly honest mess that's supported by a pair of performances so unnaturally natural that they draw you in and clutch you, struggling, to their flipping, flopping hearts.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    CQ
    It may not be art, but it's vastly more entertaining than anything Coppola senior has done in far too long.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Bird's grim, picture-perfect direction -- the Sierras are more character than backdrop, and everything else looks like it's already been digested and expelled -- augments what is frankly a small, albeit lusterless, gem of a horror show, for once with as many smarts as body parts.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    This single film beats every other Hollywood action film of the past five years, hands down. It's not even close. Welcome back, Mr. Tsui.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    These scenes of debauchery and lust that make up the film's centerpiece are among some of the most powerful and disturbing ever put to film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Durkin's film seems to exist in its own fractured dream state. It's hypnotic, narcotic, and trembling on the verge of either dread or redemption or some hazy state of nothingness in between.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    An American remake of Jorge Michel Grau's 2010 Mexican shocker, this Sundance and Fantastic Fest fan favorite is undeniably creepy stuff that’s been given a dusty, American Gothic anti-sheen courtesy of cinematographer Ryan Samul.

Top Trailers