For 1,714 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Marc Savlov's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Twelve Monkeys
Lowest review score: 0 Halloween: Resurrection
Score distribution:
1,714 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Mamet's dialogue is still on the mark, rapid-fire, and as cutting as an antique straight razor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The filmmaker brings neither condescension nor moral outrage here. A father confessor to his benighted characters, von Trier may revel in the muck, but Nymphomaniac: Volume 1 is anything but a dirty movie.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    All of the major players turn in powerhouse performances, and Fishburne nails his best role yet as Furious.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Filmmaker Steve James is apparently incapable of making an uninteresting documentary, even when his subject matter might presumably be thoroughly played out.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    300
    Not since Mario Bava's "Hercules in the Haunted World" has Greco-Roman movie-house mythmaking been so thoroughly well-conceived and executed.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Unlike anything you've ever seen before, Final Fantasy is, finally, one for the history books, and tremendous fun to boot. It makes Lara Croft look like an old maid.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    There's a deep, bone-weary melancholy to the proceedings, offset by the mad parties and vicious displays of machismo.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Might also be the best date movie ever, depending on your idea of a good time.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The fact that Troy Nixey's debut feature is one creepyass frightmare is what matters, and boy, does he put the nail in that metaphorical coffin the first time out. It's not perfect, but it's awfully close.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    This romance isn't a sunshine-dappled meadow, it's a thicket of thorny rosebushes atop a rocky precipice. Both actors are alarmingly natural in their roles and Ade's direction is a model of subtly shifting tones and tempers.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Thankfully, The Nomi Song should go a long way toward re-cementing this striking creature's legendary status.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's an uncomfortable, distressing, and altogether provocative take on the global culture of media violence that not only draws in hapless viewers, but also forces them into fait-accompli acceptance, like it or not.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Backed by a soundtrack of hip-hop and edited to within an inch of its life, Kennedy’s film has sleek gutter charm to spare.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A zippy, energetic, automotive free-for-all, a caper extravaganza minus the bleak overtones that have come to figure in so many 9mm movies these days.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Coixet’s film begins with the quiet patter of rain on skin and holds that somehow sweetly sorrowful tone throughout.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Compelling, relentless cinema.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The Punk Singer (and the formation of the Julie Ruin) offers a welcome return to, if not the fray, then certainly the front – where, as every rebel girl worth her combat boots knows, girls belong.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Brilliant, wacky, and utterly charming fluff, with millions of mad monkey minions to boot.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's also a deeply moral antiwar film, if one chooses to view it that way.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Knuckle is the real deal, with the strapping, brutally human Traveller clans butting heads with not only one another but with the very future of their subculture's existence.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's a grim, dark, and relentlessly violent film throughout; James Bond as Terminator rather than Templar – but it delivers the goods in bloody high style: explosively, sexily, and with 007 shaken (not stirred) to his icy core.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Ultimately, Lemmy is a lesson in artistic stoicism and the possibility of growing old gracefully within the confines of an art form that almost always rewards youth and punishes (or, worse, forgets) anyone over 30.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    There is a sense of ambiguity at the core of The Reader that makes it all the more brutal, all the more honest in its deflowering of love and what one imagines love ought to be instead of what it too often is.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Less a film than a lyrical, naturalistic tone poem.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Besson's visuals are, as always, vibrant and decidedly European. He fills the frames with odd-angled shots and alarming riots of color that catch you off-balance.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A Woman in Berlin is like a tour through the blast-cratered psyche of two colliding cultures, each with its own nightmarish tales to tell or acts of violence to experience.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's a small gem of a movie, disturbingly realistic and profoundly terrifying on a near-primal level.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    You’ve heard of guerrilla warfare? Buffalo Soldiers is all about guerilla capitalism.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Depp’s performance aside, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory is pure magic, swimming as it is in a black-treacle riptide of astonishing Oompa Loompa production numbers, an eerie patina of CGI airbrushing (Wonka himself looks downright pasteurized), and some almost too-clever in-jokes, and at least two references to Kurt Neumann’s 1958 film "The Fly."
    • 53 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The year's most viciously entertaining psycho-road-movie-revenge-'n'-wreckage-romance.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Impossible to shake off.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Pure unadulterated animal fun.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Well worth seeing if you have even the slightest interest in guns and sex and the interplay between the two (and who doesn't?), Burnt Money also has, you'll forgive the pun, style to burn.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Call it odious, call it repugnant, call it downright nasty – just don't call it dumb.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The good news is Craig, who was riveting as a London pharmaceutical salesman in the recent Brit import "Layer Cake," is equally mesmerizing here.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    There's more at work in this gorgeous and affecting picture than simple culinary sex appeal.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    You've got to hand it to Reynolds, director Cortés, and screenwriter Chris Sparling; they milk every single frisson of nail-ripping anxiety from a stunningly simple – yet universally recognized and dreaded – conceit and then cap it with a payoff of molar-pulverizing intensity.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Mines the traditional Western genre and infuses it with fresh, frequently hilarious life.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    By the time it's over you find yourself wondering why more films don't have the chutzpah to delve deeper into the battle-weary heart.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's all patently ridiculous, but it's also ridiculously fun.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A gorgeously crafted love poem.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A remarkable film. From its performances on down to director of photography Roger Deakins' sun-baked, dirty-ochre cinematography, the film is all of a piece.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Ultimately, I’ll Be Me is both an unconventional tribute to this American icon and a deep-down cri de coeur for more research on viable ways to retard the progression of Alzheimer’s and perhaps one day find a reliable cure. No one’s getting any younger, after all.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Immensely entertaining, Coriolanus is chock-full o' gore and the contemporary trappings of a man and a land divided, both from without and from within.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The Guy Movie to end all Guy Movies, a ridiculously overblown summer testosterone blowout right down to the Wagnerian strains of the soundtrack and its stunningly high body count. It's also a hell of a lot of fun.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Crammed to bursting with the director’s trademark magical realism. Occasionally marred by budgetary constraints, this is nevertheless a welcome return for an artist who truly deserves the sobriquet: El Maestro.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Gorgeously lensed and delightfully structured, however, this is, in a word, wonderful.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's brutal to watch the bigger-they-are-the-harder-they-fall tragedy of this once-great heavyweight. In fact, it's enough to make you cry.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The Damned United is Shakespearean in its tragedy.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    I said once before that every generation gets the superhero it deserves, and Nolan's darkest of dark knights is surely ours – and no more so than in this current incarnation. (Granted, this doesn't bode well for society, but hey, things are bleak all over.)
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's ostensibly a Southern-fried comedy of terrors, but what little humor the film evinces almost immediately lodges in your windpipe like an errant bit of K-Fried-C gristle.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A meticulously-researched chunk of underground Americana that traces the poet's full life from his rather dysfunctional childhood (beneath the hoary shadow of his mentally ill mother) to his meetings and eventual friendships with Kerouac, Burroughs, Neal Cassady and other Beat luminaries. (Review of Original Release)
    • 85 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Half Nelson, with its bleakly hopeful view of humanity both damned and redeemed – simultaneously – is uncomfortably, almost exactly right.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    No other film in recent memory has featured such a terrifically retro maniac or revisited the heyday of Eighties gore films with such gleeful, moist abandon.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's a film that you can take home and chew over later, both abrasive in its loudness and reflective in its fleeting, feminine moments of silence. Well done.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Though its reach sometimes exceeds its grasp, Tarantino has created a movie with all the gritty punch of a .44 in the belly.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance's byzantine plot appears fairly straightforward at first, but slowly, deliberately moves into uncharted waters with the fluid grace of a tiger shark bumping up against a potential meal.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A slow-burn stunner, where nothing much of consequence happens, except life itself.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A kicky, knockout thriller that ingeniously taps into the current climate of paranoia surrounding personal privacy in the Information Age.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's not perfect -- Thornton's slack-jawed yokel Jacob is played a bit wide of the mark and Fonda continues to irk in some indefinable way -- but it's a revelation for longtime Raimi fans. And it's a hell of a ride too, for both Raimi fans and newcomers alike.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Wingard’s film is its own subset of fractious family crazy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Diary of the Dead is meant to scare your pants off, blow your mind out the back of your skull, and then deposit you ungently back into reality, quaking a little, maybe, but still alive and, unlike the undead, thinking.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    While the story may be a common one (for the action genre, at least), Rodriguez, who wrote, produced, shot and edited the entire film himself, has a uniquely straightforward wit that makes what might otherwise have been just another shoot-'em-up something more than that.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Gentle and comedically nuanced exercise in mourning.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's all poppycock, of course, but it's done with such vim and vigor and both narrative and visual flair that you care not a jot. Summer has arrived.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Sublimely ridiculous film.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Like an early Clash number, it's by turns lovely and ugly, loud as bombs and quiet as a revolution's first-thrown stone; it acknowledges the legend while uncovering the truth.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    You don't have to be Jewish to enjoy this light romantic comedy, but it helps.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It plays very much like it advertises itself: a mixtape – Fear of a Black Planet, then and now.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Two Lovers is an intensely felt, character-driven film, and there's no stronger character onscreen – not even Leonard – than Leonard's wise, Jewish mother, Ruth, played with effortless, pure perfection by Rossellini.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Old-school "Gosh, wow!" sense-of-wonder filmmaking is in short supply in these anxious days, and John Carter (of Mars!) left me with my disbelief in suspended animation and once or twice with goosebumps dotting my arms. And that's enough for me.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's not a pretty picture, but it is a hellaciously gorgeous and original film.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A far cry from his earlier films sex, lies, and videotape and Kafka, Soderbergh skillfully pulls off what could have ended up as a sappy glob of treacly nostalgia. Instead, the director populates his young hero's chaotic world with genuinely disturbing people, images, and events.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Sarah Smith pulls the various threads of this wholly original – well, as original as can be reasonably expected given the thousands of cinematic iterations Christmastime has provoked over the years – together into a very coherent, visually stunning, oftentimes laugh-out-loud hilarious holiday film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Pi
    Brilliant, surreal, and emotionally draining, this first feature from American Film Institute grad Aronofsky recalls such low-budget sci-fi epics as "Tetsuo: The Iron Man" and more traditional paranoiac suspense films (Adrian Lyne's "Jacob's Ladder" in particular, but also Polanski's "Rosemary's Baby") and yet manages to be a wholly original animal.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Pure, goofy fun.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A humanistic adventure film that's both rich with characterization and concussive cannon bursts, Master and Commander is, surprisingly, some of the best work either Crowe or Weir have ever done.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The Hunger Games is first and foremost an adventure/survival story, and director Ross keeps things moving with nary a moment of downtime. There's precious little fat on the script; it's a lean, mean antifascist machine, and Lawrence is at once winsome and spectacularly engaging as Katniss (so much so that all her male costars pale into near-blandness in comparison).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Skateboarding is not a crime, but the subject of this exhaustive documentary... is very much a criminal.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A razor-wire-taut (and extremely violent) exploration of what happens when good guys go bad, badder, baddest.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Thanks to the superior performances by all four leads (including incredibly expressive Karoline Eckertz, who appears as the teenage Regina midway through), Nowhere in Africa is a meditation on everything from race and class and cultural impermanence to the inexhaustible malleability of youth.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It should be mandatory viewing for right-to-lifers and prospective parents as well as fans of creepy, crawly filmmaking.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    No one has ever succeeded with anything approximating the sheer energetic brilliance of what Lee has managed here. For all intents and purposes, this is a comic-book movie in the very truest and most vibrant sense of the phrase.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    This is frightening stuff, ably helmed (by writer/director Gorak, art director on the nerve janglers Fight Club and Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas), viciously acted, and altogether horrific in ways George A. Romero could imagine only through the lens of the darkest sort of fantasy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The U.S. won the Olympic gold, but as seen here, the Russians’ story is by far the more genuinely Olympian, making this a handy victory over all previously told accounts of that so-called miracle.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    "Dr. Goodlove," or "How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Proletariat" might have been a better title for this ingratiatingly loopy origin story about prerevolutionary icon Ernesto "Che" Guevara.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    If you're not already smitten with all things Gaiman, you may well find yourself, like Helena, a stranger in a strange land.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Apparently fit and reasonably trim, Deal's honesty touches a nerve that the band's music only gnawed on back in the day.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    As a surrealistic depiction of the mental disintegration of Jim (Abramsohn), a seemingly ordinary family guy, while visiting “the happiest place on Earth,” it’s a prank and a spit in the eye of Disney’s relentless cheerfulness. But director Randy Moore’s pièce de résistance goes far beyond flipping the bird to the mouse that roars.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    It's unlike anything else out now, and Williams, to his credit and our immense relief, has for the moment foresworn his usual giddiness in favor of a muted, hunched acting style that befits both the character of Noone and the overall tone of the film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    It's nail-biting good fun, sporting some très haute couture nails.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    A top-notch example of uninsulting kid humor at its goofiest.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    For all its stentorian performances, though, Shadow of the Vampire is a bit much, from the detailed period sets to the final, bloody scene.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    An intelligent, viscerally kinetic throw-down, a jolt of pure adrenalized Spike that holds more than a few touches of genius in its overripe storyline.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Falling somewhere between the horrors of Three … Extremes and the beauties of Eros, this triptych of short films set in and underscored by the titular megalopolis is a gorgeous, sprawling mess.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    If Red Hill isn't quite a classic, it surely is a work of genuine passion for a genre that's unmistakable, and unkillable.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Suffers from a surplus of interviews and information that imbue it with a vague sense of overkill.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    It’s a message movie, as are all kids films these days, but these environmentally-aware messages are sweet and unforced, and well worth hearing.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    A solid, intermittently excellent, and extremely exsanguinatory take on what Stephen King famously referred to as the "Spam in a cabin" genre.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    It's also and most interestingly about the writing process itself, a difficult feat to pull off on film, which Wagner and co-screenwriter Fred Parnes manage to display with unvarnished realism.

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