For 1,682 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.3 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Marc Savlov's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 52
Highest review score: 100 Control
Lowest review score: 0 Valentine
Score distribution:
1,682 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    No matter how bad you may have it, you'll feel better about your own lot in life after watching the tumultuous sexual flailings of Marcela and Jarda (Brejchová and Luknár), a way, way, way down on their luck Czech couple.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's like the Sixties never happened, or maybe happened too much.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Even if you're familiar with the details of the game, Rafferty's suspenseful editing draws you to the edge of your seat and beyond, back into 1968 itself.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A drop-dead gorgeous period noir, rife with paranoia, femmes fatales, and good men inexorably sinking into the bloody mire and opaque texture of life (and death) during wartime.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    This romance isn't a sunshine-dappled meadow, it's a thicket of thorny rosebushes atop a rocky precipice. Both actors are alarmingly natural in their roles and Ade's direction is a model of subtly shifting tones and tempers.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's a finely calibrated, spiraling lesson in what NOT to do when engaging in adultery, blackmail, arson, and general antisocial behaviors, and in its best moments it recalls the everyday darkness of James M. Cain: average people doing awful things in an amoral and uncaring universe.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Mines the traditional Western genre and infuses it with fresh, frequently hilarious life.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The Adjustment Bureau is, above all, a romance of chance and chaos theory of the heart. (In this respect, some viewers will recognize it as kin to the early Gwyneth Paltrow fantasy "Sliding Doors.")
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The shock ending isn't all that shocking if you're a fan of genre films, but it's nonetheless effective despite the fact that it sidesteps several key questions. Never mind: It's hellishly fun.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    You've got to hand it to Reynolds, director Cortés, and screenwriter Chris Sparling; they milk every single frisson of nail-ripping anxiety from a stunningly simple – yet universally recognized and dreaded – conceit and then cap it with a payoff of molar-pulverizing intensity.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A fearless sort of melodramaticism that might have seemed silly if it weren't for the impeccable EVERYTHING on display here, from the lush, sexy camerawork of director of photography Yorick Le Saux (Swimming Pool) to the throbbing, atavistic score by John Adams. It's not silly or, at least, rarely so, and Swinton's nuanced, aching performance is downright revelatory.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    You need only see Get Low for absolute proof that, while Hollywood may be in decline even as bad actors' salaries climb ever higher, there remain at least three very exemplary reasons – Duvall, Spacek, and Murray – to switch off your home theatre and get out into a real one.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The fact that Troy Nixey's debut feature is one creepyass frightmare is what matters, and boy, does he put the nail in that metaphorical coffin the first time out. It's not perfect, but it's awfully close.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Summer Wars is a magnificently manufactured piece of film entertainment that goes beyond the obvious and manages to comment, often obliquely, on everything from Facebook to virtual war and/or terrorism without ever seeming heavy-handed or strident.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's not nearly as complex and eerily existential as the director's debut, "Moon," but in its own way it's an even more satisfying time slice of identity-scrambled sci-fi.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's a strange and electrifying brew of Hollywood genre tropes recalibrated for a globalized sensibility.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's also a deeply moral antiwar film, if one chooses to view it that way.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    This is smart, quirky, frequently laugh-out-loud comedy, in all seriousness.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's a knockout, sucker punch of a performance, and although it doesn't completely erase the memory of Rapace (and why should it?), Mara's doomy gaze cuts through the hype and bores straight into your soul.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The Hunger Games is first and foremost an adventure/survival story, and director Ross keeps things moving with nary a moment of downtime. There's precious little fat on the script; it's a lean, mean antifascist machine, and Lawrence is at once winsome and spectacularly engaging as Katniss (so much so that all her male costars pale into near-blandness in comparison).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Sarah Smith pulls the various threads of this wholly original – well, as original as can be reasonably expected given the thousands of cinematic iterations Christmastime has provoked over the years – together into a very coherent, visually stunning, oftentimes laugh-out-loud hilarious holiday film.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Jack Black redeems himself (for Gulliver's Travels, among other things) with a subtly quirky performance that's one of his personal best.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Put on your best Southie accent and say it with me: This film is wicked fahwkin' retahded and I loved it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Immensely entertaining, Coriolanus is chock-full o' gore and the contemporary trappings of a man and a land divided, both from without and from within.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Director Espinosa stages the endless action with a tremendous flair that recalls John Woo's grittier moments, and cinematographer Oliver Wood, who shot Woo's finest Hollywood moment, "Face/Off," gives the whole violent show a downright brackish look that borders on the sublime.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Ultimately, Lemmy is a lesson in artistic stoicism and the possibility of growing old gracefully within the confines of an art form that almost always rewards youth and punishes (or, worse, forgets) anyone over 30.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Although not directed by Hiyao Miyazaki (though he executive-produced and co-wrote it), the film retains the look and feel of the "Spirited Away" master's best work, allowing for huge emotions amidst a world of Lilliputian scope.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Old-school "Gosh, wow!" sense-of-wonder filmmaking is in short supply in these anxious days, and John Carter (of Mars!) left me with my disbelief in suspended animation and once or twice with goosebumps dotting my arms. And that's enough for me.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Fans of all that has come before (excluding Roger Corman's premature-ejaculation version of "The Fantastic Four," natch) will weep tears of giddy joy at how crowd-pleasingly cohesive – and ridiculously fun – this film is.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Benjamin Walker, as Lincoln, may not have the gangly gravitas of Raymond Massey's "Abe Lincoln in Illinois" – he looks like a young Liam Neeson doing a younger Bruce Campbell, frankly – but he does have a sly, self-effacing sense of humor that feels ever so Lincoln-esque
    • 78 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    I said once before that every generation gets the superhero it deserves, and Nolan's darkest of dark knights is surely ours – and no more so than in this current incarnation. (Granted, this doesn't bode well for society, but hey, things are bleak all over.)
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The result is a film that looks like no other in recent memory.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Durkin's film seems to exist in its own fractured dream state. It's hypnotic, narcotic, and trembling on the verge of either dread or redemption or some hazy state of nothingness in between.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Of course, if you loathed the first film, this one probably won't do much to change your mind. But fans, and I count myself among them, of the Weitz brothers' unexpectedly enjoyable original will find themselves in a familiar and perhaps comforting place … filthy language, risqué situations, die-hard friendships, and all.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Laika's stop-motion animation is every bit as inspired here as it was in their rightfully lauded "Coraline," and the storyline never wavers from its boneyard-deep message: Being different from others is a good – nay, great – thing, no matter how many villagers (or zombies) are after you.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    What's so intensely pleasurable about The Artist, however, is not its predetermined seriocomic trajectory but the endless parade of smartly creative and self-referential gags, which include all manner of sly, silent delights; the inevitable Jack Russell; and even an extended orchestral cue of Bernard Herrmann's, cribbed outright from "Vertigo."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The Desolation of Smaug is, on the whole, a vast improvement over The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey. It’s a popcorn movie (in the best sense) disguised as deep-core nerdism.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It plays very much like it advertises itself: a mixtape – Fear of a Black Planet, then and now.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Filmmaker Steve James is apparently incapable of making an uninteresting documentary, even when his subject matter might presumably be thoroughly played out.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Referencing everything from "Deliverance" to "The Evil Dead" to "Fargo" and nailing its central conceit dead-on (literally!), this is one of those rare genre comedies that near-perfectly balances its blend of grue, guffaws, and gag reflexes.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Absolutely, 100% kickass. Now would someone please get busy on the "Tank Girl" do-over, please?
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's a disturbing film on many, many levels, but beautifully shot (by Seamus McGarvey) and shot through with a horrific sense of false hope. The kid is not all right.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's not a pretty picture, but it is a hellaciously gorgeous and original film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Despite its short running time, Being Elmo is an engrossingly layered documentary.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    What makes The Innkeepers such an unnerving experience isn't the outright horror but rather the lack of it. West mines every single floorboard creek and shadowy corridor for maximum frisson; this film ventures far beyond creepy and into the rarely explored land of genuine, incremental fear.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Knuckle is the real deal, with the strapping, brutally human Traveller clans butting heads with not only one another but with the very future of their subculture's existence.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Based on actual events, this claustrophobic epic is as emotional as they come: a Holocaust story shot through with a layer of darkness both literal and figurative
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    As depressing as it may sound on paper, directors Argott and Fenton have crafted a deeply disturbing but equally moving documentary.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    This artful documentary about renowned Tokyo sushi master Jiro Ono is not going to help save Charlie the Tuna one iota.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    True love is never having to say goodbye … because when you look in the mirror, there s/he is.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It is an inspired, strange, and occasionally choke-on-your-popcorn funny ensemble piece that, frankly, blows just about every other current comedy out of the water.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    While very much a “hard R” movie, Rise of an Empire is, nevertheless, the perfect sort of film for rainy weekend afternoons. It’s a spectacle right down to its shattered ships and duplicitous warcraft, and this time out the story’s been leavened and enlivened with plenty of old-school girl power.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The crime is beyond bizarre, and the film is relentlessly suspenseful, but perhaps the most disturbing question of all is this: Whatever happened to Nicholas Barclay? To that, there remains no satisfactory answer.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's a small gem of a movie, disturbingly realistic and profoundly terrifying on a near-primal level.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It's ostensibly a Southern-fried comedy of terrors, but what little humor the film evinces almost immediately lodges in your windpipe like an errant bit of K-Fried-C gristle.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The performances have remained continuously excellent throughout The Hobbit trilogy, and they remain so here; likewise Howard Shore’s score, which is particularly righteous – bloodthirsty when it needs to be, keening when a particularly major character is cut down.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Wingard’s film is its own subset of fractious family crazy.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The House I Live In is depressing stuff, but it sparks the fires of anger, and from that anger, possible action.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A far cry from his earlier films sex, lies, and videotape and Kafka, Soderbergh skillfully pulls off what could have ended up as a sappy glob of treacly nostalgia. Instead, the director populates his young hero's chaotic world with genuinely disturbing people, images, and events.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It’s fun, gore-drenched, and even touching at times. All that’s missing from the toothy chaos and broad comedy on display here is Dame Judi Dench and the kickass title that could have been: "The Best Necrotic Mandible Hotel."
    • 64 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The filmmaker brings neither condescension nor moral outrage here. A father confessor to his benighted characters, von Trier may revel in the muck, but Nymphomaniac: Volume 1 is anything but a dirty movie.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    A riot of colors, Kika is sometimes sick, sometimes playful, but consistently hilarious and entertaining in ways that few films have been lately.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The film’s love for its subjects is mirrored in their passionate frenzy for words, and language – spoken, written, body – in general. Above all, and what sets it apart from other cinematic takes on the Beatified, is how much fun it is. It may end in tears, but then, don’t all great love stories?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Call it odious, call it repugnant, call it downright nasty – just don't call it dumb.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Spark, however, is the best of the lot when it comes to attempting to grok the burn and the burners.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    An American remake of Jorge Michel Grau's 2010 Mexican shocker, this Sundance and Fantastic Fest fan favorite is undeniably creepy stuff that’s been given a dusty, American Gothic anti-sheen courtesy of cinematographer Ryan Samul.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The Punk Singer (and the formation of the Julie Ruin) offers a welcome return to, if not the fray, then certainly the front – where, as every rebel girl worth her combat boots knows, girls belong.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    What Reggio’s ultimate point or conclusion might be is, as ever, left up to the viewer for interpretation. And while this is patently not a film that big-box cineplexers are going to rush to in droves, Visitors remains a wondrous work of artistic achievement.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    With The Guest, Wingard and Barrett have once more upped the ante for the indie horror flick pack.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    What’s great about this “documentary” – Cave gets a script credit alongside the directors, which kind of invalidates the whole notion of hands-off documentary filmmaking – is that it delves deeply into Cave’s notoriously fussy creative process without ever becoming stodgy or dull.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Crammed to bursting with the director’s trademark magical realism. Occasionally marred by budgetary constraints, this is nevertheless a welcome return for an artist who truly deserves the sobriquet: El Maestro.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Open Windows has plenty to say about both the death of privacy and the dominion of the always-connected digiverse we now inhabit, and editor Bernat Vilaplana does a remarkable job of keeping the film’s frenetic pace rushing headlong toward an ending that you’ll never see coming.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Ultimately, I’ll Be Me is both an unconventional tribute to this American icon and a deep-down cri de coeur for more research on viable ways to retard the progression of Alzheimer’s and perhaps one day find a reliable cure. No one’s getting any younger, after all.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Much has been made of the film's ending, vis-à-vis whether or not it's a pro- or anti-organized religion commentary of some sort. The Hughes Brothers, for two, say they just wanted to make a kickass piece of contemporary entertainment, and I, for one, believe them.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Due in large part to its cultural relevance, this is also one of the few sequels that nearly succeeds in topping the original.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Here's hoping that younger members of the audience will seek out Conan Doyle's original stories to further explore Holmes' official amanuensis, Dr. John Watson, whose brilliant case studies regarding his friend, roommate, and fellow rationalist are the stuff dreams are made of.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    The Road deviates from McCarthy's original text via a series of flashbacks to the man's pre-apocalyptic life with the woman (Theron) who both leaves her family behind and is in turn left behind by them.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    For all its stylistic flourishes and interlocking storylines, Inglourious Basterds is, at its bullet-riddled core, a bloody good war movie, twisting and twisted and full of wordy shrapnel but no less kickass for it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    You may have the biggest flat-screen DLP monitor in the city, but Red Cliff will never look half as spectacular as it will on the big – and I mean really big – screen.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    It's more fun than a poke in the heart with a sharp stick.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    While 28 Weeks Later ultimately falls shy of classic status (it's no Panic in Year Zero!), there are several hard-to-shake scenes -- nightmare visions, really -- that reveal the infected populace to be far less dangerous to the fabric of a civilized society than, perhaps, the very notion of civilization itself.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Remarkable and enlightening.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    A film within a film encapsulated by a clever and very accurate anti-materialistic Buddhist morality lesson, Travellers and Magicians feels a bit like Chaucer's Canterbury Tales as retold by Siddhartha.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Has the look and feel of Euro-Altman (vastly superior to Euro-Disney, mind you).
    • 56 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    A smart albeit uneven jab at everything from the clubbing life to the male inclination toward Peter Pan.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    It's nonstop chaos, and the everything-and-the-kitchen-sink style of comedy is taxing despite the frequent moments of pure comic genius.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Unleashed suffers from a surfeit of sentimentality at times (blame Besson for that), but it's Li's first major Western role of any depth and he acquits himself admirably as both mad dog and melancholy master.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    A vast improvement over the previous two outings, but still and all, it's no "Star Wars."
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    The voice acting, from new Batman Bale to the almost unrecognizable Bacall is fine – even Crystal reigns in his usual Borscht Belt bravado – if a little plain.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Becomes something of a rainswept Korean koan on both the nobility and futility of persistence in the face of obviously insurmountable odds.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    While Linklater's version has its own unique pacing, mounting up more like a series of innings than a series of acts (even if you think you know how it ends, that bottom-of-the-ninth screwball still beans you silly), it lacks the screwball-to-the-noggin punch of the original.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    The delectably atmospheric Asylum remains gothic to its morally maggoty core.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Red Eye's no classic, but with its smart, twisty little script and those two killer performances, it is a helluva lot of fun.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    At its best when it goes down to the pub and captures, quite flawlessly, the grotty intoxication of these mad, bad, dangerous-to-know Hammers fans hoisting incalculable pints.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    There's a manipulative streak to the proceedings, and you'd have to be stone cold dead not to grasp the inevitable outcome long before the third act, but it's a professionally handled sort of emotional manipulation common to its genre, dating back to "Blithe Spirit" and, somewhat less memorably, "The Ghost and Mrs. Muir."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Despite a marketing campaign that appears bound and determined to make its subject look as grindingly dull as possible, Roll Bounce triumphs on almost all counts.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    If you're not already smitten with all things Gaiman, you may well find yourself, like Helena, a stranger in a strange land.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    This is a war film with precious little war, which was also the crux of Swofford's book.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    A charming, winsome slice of Seventies pop kitsch reconceived as a kind of Knight-errant quest for that holiest of all grails, dear old mom.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    The Descent may not be everything you've heard, but man, it's also a lot of things you haven't.

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