For 1,929 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 58% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Marc Savlov's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 The Look of Silence
Lowest review score: 0 The Flintstones in Viva Rock Vegas
Score distribution:
1929 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Marc Savlov
    Black Sea is cluttered and claustrophobic in all the right ways, and it doubles as a watery jeremiad against global corporate malfeasance. Still, you walk away from the film with the niggling sense that the story never quite holds your attention the way it should.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    It may not be spring yet, but this sweet little gem of a movie is the perfect antidote to that lengthy stretch of grimy gray weather Austin endured a while back.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Marc Savlov
    Heady stuff, indeed, but perfect midnight-date movie fare if you’re, uh, in the mood.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    There are so many terrific things going on in the film – rapid-fire wordplay, split-second visual gags, and some veddy, veddy British punning – that, frankly, Paddington deserves more than one viewing. Huzzah Paddington, and marmalade forever!
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Marc Savlov
    What’s missing from The Woman in Black 2, and what it needs most and has least of all, is suspense.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Wahlberg brings an intense, often internalized performance to a wickedly written role, and while he’s no James Caan, he’s certainly able to infuse this mesmerizing character study with enough rancid brio to make this self-flagellating hustler believably doomstruck.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    This is Burton’s most mainstream film to date, which isn’t to say it’s not an eccentrically entertaining ride. It is, but minus the kooky occult élan you expect from the man who made "Edward Scissorhands." It’s a Lifetime movie, as directed by, well, you know who.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    The performances have remained continuously excellent throughout The Hobbit trilogy, and they remain so here; likewise Howard Shore’s score, which is particularly righteous – bloodthirsty when it needs to be, keening when a particularly major character is cut down.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 67 Marc Savlov
    Exodus is an entertainment of the first order. I’m not so sure about the filmmaker’s decision to render the Metatron archangel as a 9-year-old boy, but what the hell? You get hit on the head with a boulder, who knows what you’ll see?
    • tbd Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    It’s Fukumoto’s wonderfully weathered countenance that makes Ochiai’s film such an elegiac delight. On it, you can see the entire history of samurai cinema, or at least that essential part of it that died often, and beautifully so.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Ultimately, I’ll Be Me is both an unconventional tribute to this American icon and a deep-down cri de coeur for more research on viable ways to retard the progression of Alzheimer’s and perhaps one day find a reliable cure. No one’s getting any younger, after all.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Why Don’t You Play in Hell? isn’t for everyone, but neither was Stravinsky’s "The Rite of Spring." Genius is genius, no matter how many audience members may riot.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    Open Windows has plenty to say about both the death of privacy and the dominion of the always-connected digiverse we now inhabit, and editor Bernat Vilaplana does a remarkable job of keeping the film’s frenetic pace rushing headlong toward an ending that you’ll never see coming.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Citizenfour is obviously in Snowden’s corner, but as an example of pure cinema vérité, this is the finest – and most disturbing – political documentary since Alex Gibney’s Oscar-winning "Taxi to the Dark Side."
    • 38 Metascore
    • 11 Marc Savlov
    Hasbro’s long-lasting occult board game gets its own starring role in a film that makes those other recent Hasbro plaything adaptations – namely "Transformers" and "G.I. Joe" – look like triumphs of subtly engineered cinematic magic.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Marc Savlov
    The creature’s big reveal is masterfully handled and a final revelation is exceptionally memorable, but the characters, unsurprisingly, remain interchangeable with those of any number of other teens-in-peril pics.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    The Blue Room is mesmerizing, psychologically complex, and, at the very end, viscerally devastating. They don’t make them like this much anymore, but they should.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    A third-act revelation will knock viewers silly and cause them to reevaluate everything that’s come before, but even without that jaw-dropping information, Moss’ film is a righteous piece of empathetic, of-the-moment documentary filmmaking.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Marc Savlov
    Fuller’s film is inarguably a stone-cold classic of the genre, but Fury, for all its cacophonous chaos and half-crazed characters, never quite reaches the shellshocked heights required to make it a bona fide pillar of cinematic combat.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Marc Savlov
    The Indonesian-born brother/sister filmmaking duo of Ken and Livi Zheng scores high points for creating a new take on the undocumented-immigrant badass story (hola, Machete), and for their obvious martial arts skills, but this first feature from the pair is ultimately hobbled by a paucity of credible acting.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Marc Savlov
    It’s a worthy effort, and Webb’s story is important. Nevertheless, Kill the Messenger feels extremely dated: In these cynical times, it’s too little, too late, which is too bad.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 Marc Savlov
    Another addition to Universal’s Pictures Classic Monsters arsenal of crap (remember Van Helsing?), director Shore, in his feature debut, displays a fine sense of pacing but little else.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Marc Savlov
    While it’s possible that Annabelle might give a few audience members goosebumps, anyone who’s ever seen "Rosemary’s Baby" –or pretty much any film James Wan’s had a hand in since helming 2007’s "Dead Silence", the "Saw" franchise excepted – will figure out what’s going on within the first 30 minutes.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    What’s great about this “documentary” – Cave gets a script credit alongside the directors, which kind of invalidates the whole notion of hands-off documentary filmmaking – is that it delves deeply into Cave’s notoriously fussy creative process without ever becoming stodgy or dull.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    Fantasies and phantasms aside, Fincher proves himself yet again to be a better cinematic psychologist of (in-)human nature than almost any other director alive. It’s another squirmily excellent date movie from hell, courtesy of contemporary cinema’s most overt nihilist.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 78 Marc Savlov
    With The Guest, Wingard and Barrett have once more upped the ante for the indie horror flick pack.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 20 Marc Savlov
    The Boxtrolls feels rough-and-tumble and not as much fun by half.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Marc Savlov
    With A Walk Among the Tombstones, the names have been changed but the story’s all too familiar. Speaking of which, "Taken 3" is on its way.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 89 Marc Savlov
    There are many questions raised and answered in this film, but one that isn’t is why on Earth it’s garnered an R rating. Love Is Strange is anything but. It’s a seriocomic romance of the most genteel sort, full of heartfelt “I love yous,” brief (and definitely unerotic) snuggling, and a wealth of tremendously fine acting from all involved.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Marc Savlov
    James Gandolfini’s wintery silences and bitter outbursts are enough on their own to merit seeing this otherwise frustratingly vague slice of low-end Crooklyn crime life, but just barely.

Top Trailers