Marjorie Baumgarten

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For 1,619 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 63% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Marjorie Baumgarten's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 A Prophet
Lowest review score: 0 Miami Connection (1987)
Score distribution:
1619 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The film looks good (nod to cinematographer Roman Vasyanov). The images are sharp even when the film’s ideas are not.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Despite successfully creating the illusion of forbidden glimpses, The Good Shepherd slogs through most of its lengthy running time.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Ultimately feels like a movie whose heart is in the right place, even though someone neglected to flip the 'On' switch.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    On the whole, the film feels detached and morose, just like its characters.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    After establishing this interesting premise, writer/director James DeMonaco only scratches the surface of its implications before devolving into a creepy roundelay of murders and deaths averted.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    This is really Reygadas' show all the way. And what he's delivered is a sad, tawdry picture in which all hope for salvation lies with God.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    This children's sci-fi movie should be palatable to the young and old alike, yet it's ultimately more a mild diversion than a magical adventure.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Smashed may be better at preaching to the choir and is likely to find its largest audience among struggling 12-steppers.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Hotel for Dogs is a decent family film, sure to please animal-loving kids and their parents alike. Well-acted, the movie also looks good and is stocked with lots of goofy gadgetry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Despite the vividness of the movement and the philosophical underpinnings of the cause and its tactical shifts, Suffragette unfolds in a sequentially predictable manner.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Maybe it's indicative of my end-of-the-year brain-fry, but this dopey comedy about two of the dumbest guys in the universe on a road trip to misadventure is a hoot.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    As a vehicle for Gina Gershon to strut her provocative stuff, Prey for Rock & Roll is a rock & roll fantasy come to life.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Like most dreams revisited with eyes wide open, this one's content dissolves into a transparent puddle of inchoate thoughts and predictable iconography.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    This biography, to our surprise, is extremely respectful and earnest and lacking Morris' usual transformational touch.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    What we witness onscreen is horrifying and deeply disturbing (as it should be), but a little more context might help us to not feel so marooned.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    You’ll be the richer for spending time in Crimmins’ company, but the material seems better suited to the small screen.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The movie treats all its characters kindly -– especially in moments where it would be easy to go for the cheap shot -– but there’s either not enough froth or meat on its bones to sate the appetite.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The storyline goes from bad to worse as one-dimensional characters gradually flatten out into pure stick figures, and the crime plot goes from hokey to implausible.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Rather than providing a foil for Bill Murray in "Lost in Translation" or embodying the mostly silent model for the painter Vermeer in "The Girl With One Pearl Earring," Johansson actually has to emote prodigiously here, and she is just not up to the task.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    An additional change in the film's adaptation from Scott Phillips' novel substitutes the author's original ending for a redemptive conclusion that seems indicative of The Ice Harvest's unwillingness to really plumb the real depths of the darkness it has set in motion.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    To my mind, movies about watching nomads walk rank alongside movies about writers writing: The action is dull and endlessly repetitive, and most of the interesting stuff occurs in the mind’s interior.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Bassett as Voletta is her usual captivating self.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The film is at its best when painting the atmosphere and detail of 1953 Dublin.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The how-it-was-made demonstration may have been the most captivating part of Mars Needs Moms.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    A standard-issue family reunion dramedy, The Hollars has several genuine moments of human interaction that are near-magical to observe because they feel so plucked from real life.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The performances are all terrific, but Together never jells as a compelling narrative.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The setup is great, but Fading Gigolo’s follow-through lacks dynamism.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Bottle Rocket's minimalist pop has a refreshing flavor but insufficient bubbles for a long, cool drink. Maybe someone ought to think about culling this thing down into a sustainable short film.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Benjamin Bratt ably depicts both sides of this character and creates a memorable portrait in the process.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Coprophiliacs looking for a movie that really rings their chimes will be positively tintinnabulating from this arthouse horror number.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    There's no denying that Pacino's performance is superb. The rest of the movie plays like a bunch of inconsequentially strung together sequences.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    A mildly engaging and roughly historical action picture.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The hit-or-miss nature of the gags makes NBT too uneven to recommend, but it's a great calling-card movie for guys who want to become professional comedy writers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The obvious thing is to say that Keep the River on Your Right has unfortunately bitten off more than it can chew -- but not more than we can digest.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The pleasure of watching two alpha males -– Al Pacino and Colin Farrell -– circling each other mano a mano substantially beefs up this otherwise routine spy thriller.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Like "Bring It On," Stick It is so much better than most of its insipid teen-movie peers yet like her earlier movie, Bendinger's new one is also not all it might be.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Despite the film's abundant gory effects, its best technical achievement may be its English subtitles, which move about the screen for better visual and emotional impact, and sometimes dissolve into poofs of blood or other colored effects.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Lottery Ticket is ultimately no "Friday," but that 15-year-old film's communal vibe is clearly the model Lottery Ticket is chasing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Renoir is great at capturing some of the details of daily life within this unique household and conveying an Impressionist atmosphere on film, but as far as telling us a story, the film is a washout.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Provides a panorama without insight.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    If nothing else, 6 Years is a testament to the cohesion of the Austin filmmaking community. You can barely round a corner without seeing a familiar face or production credit.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Yet even though Forever After is not as fresh-seeming as its predecessors, it provides passable entertainment, especially for the kids who won’t be familiar with the George Bailey storyline retread – or midlife crises, for that matter.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Unfortunately, the film is as bloodless as its purported crime. In the Name of My Daughter is presented dispassionately, and the performances neither intrigue nor captivate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Welcome to Me isn’t laughing with Alice, but at her, in what seems like a harsh reaction to mental illness.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Fails in a pretty spectacular manner but, to its everlasting credit, it goes down swinging and sometimes even connecting.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Day Watch falls prey to the curse of most sequels in which "more" is often a thin concept stretched beyond its limits and misconstrued to mean "bigger and better."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    One thing Siegel got absolutely right in this film is the casting.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    With The Ice Storm, Lee seems to have emphasized the details of cultural accuracy over the rudiments of telling a gripping drama.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The film is never less than absorbing to watch. However, in the end, I think Catfish lives up to its namesake's reputation as a bottom-feeder.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    At its best when making the political personal, the film’s exposure of a husband’s enduring mystery about his wife’s motivations has a universal appeal.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    An almost sweet sensibility emerges by the end of Bad Grandpa. Young Jackson Nicholl is a real find: The kid can really hold his own against Knoxville’s master pranker.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Pacino delivers his best work in a long time, but it’s contained within an utterly predictable redemption movie that only comes alive when Pacino plays one-on-one scenes with the other members of the cast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Provides lots of good information for newcomers to the cause.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Ultimately never slices things as sharply as it attempts, but it’s definitely a cut above.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    A sweet German movie by a first-time filmmaker, who, I would bet, is more than a little familiar with the early work of Jim Jarmusch or just about any Aki KaurismŠki film.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    William Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice may help in bringing some of the Bard's language to life, but this rendition is hardly a freshman course.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Opens strongly and front-loads its best gags into the first third of the film. After that, the jokes begin to repeat themselves, and the plot becomes mired in unintelligible details of the white-collar crime.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Ultimately a shambling tale told with genial grace but little substance. It provides a pleasant buzz while it unfolds but vanishes quickly in a puff of smoke.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Might be more engaging were it not for the melodrama heavily larded into the screenplay (cobbled together by numerous writers).
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    If it weren't so rivetingly realistic, it would be an easy film to dismiss. And if it weren't so easily dismissible, it would be an easy film to defend.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    If overly familiar and uninspired, Home is nevertheless agreeable, especially for young viewers who haven’t been down this road countless times.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The film has little flash of life and energy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    A Late Quartet overplays its bass line and loses sight of the melody, making for a movie that is heavy-handed and sluggish. It remains earthbound when it should soar.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    A movie worth viewing. Besides, it's the only movie to boast NYC millionaire mayor-elect Michael Bloomberg as its executive producer.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Still, you find yourself rooting for these women, even if their adventures aren’t always up to snuff.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The true wonder of this low-budget movie, however, is its acquisition of the rights to so much of the previously mentioned music. It's almost exclusively Dylan and the Dead, but damned if you won't be stopping for some Cherry Garcia ice cream on the way home.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    This film is more a love story about the marriage between Hitchcock (Anthony Hopkins) and his wife, Alma Reville (Helen Mirren), rather than a historically accurate backstage look at the making of this important movie in the Hitchcock filmography and the American psyche.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    As filmmaking debuts go, Panos Cosmatos' Beyond the Black Rainbow is as striking as it is nuts.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    But 'neath its candy-coated shell lies several solid grains of truth -- not to mention some fab choreography, a solid-gold title, and a couple of pristine examples (in Swayze and Grey) of what is meant by the term "career-making performance."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The two fantastic performances by Allen and Costner that anchor The Upside of Anger are the reason to see this contemporary drama.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The costume design, however, is the film's most enthralling aspect; replicas of actual Chanel designs were created for the film, and a fresh costume graces nearly every sequence. Alas, Coco Chanel & Igor Stravinsky unfolds on a screen instead of a catwalk.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Provocative though it is, Felt literally wears its ideas on its sleeves.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    There is no doubt the film is exquisitely felt, yet Touched With Fire often feels like a "David and Lisa" redux for the psychotropic drug era.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    AKA
    An interesting though not extremely successful experiment, but it definitely makes you want to see what Duncan Roy does next.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Even though the movie is made with an abundance of heart, it's sad to report that the final result has only a weak pulse.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Strong performances and Miller's equivocal stance toward her characters save the movie from its symbolic overload and melodramatic crash course, but in the end there may be less here than meets the eye.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    All goes according to course, and that's exactly the problem with Dan in Real Life.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Not a sequel, not a prequel, but a "reimagining" as the producers say. And they're basically correct, although I wouldn't put any real emphasis on the "imagination" aspect of that term.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The Christian faith-based film genre takes a dramatic leap forward with 90 Minutes in Heaven, a well-appointed work based on Don Piper’s bestseller, that, for a change, doesn’t look and sound as though it was written, performed, and recorded in some church basement.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Adams is absolutely winning in this role, which requires her to be a tough-as-nails attorney, grownup tomboy, and psychologically scarred adult. And she makes a good foil for Eastwood, though it's often uncomfortable to see the actor going through melodramatic paces.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Enemy at the Gates is a disappointment primarily because it seems so rich with possibilities.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The documentary hasn’t the depth of another study of high school ball, "Hoop Dreams,"' and tends toward repetition, but, in the end, its heartfelt saga scores.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Although handsomely mounted, this latest star in the Marvel Universe is not a leading light. But it probably has enough juice to keep the galaxy spinning until something more original comes along and knocks it out of orbit.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Writer-director Byler, in his first feature film, also proves to be a noteworthy new voice, even if his cinematic sense outweighs his narrative sense in this initial outing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    As a biopic, the movie has several shortcomings, but as a background story Madame Satã is full of atmosphere.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Tangled is a serviceable kids' picture and marks a milestone in the history of Disney animation, but it's splitting hairs to characterize it beyond that.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    British actor Hiddleston transcendently captures the sound of Williams’ voice and his performative swagger, and it’s something that’s worth seeing for its amazing conjuring act.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The window Hollywoodland offers into old-style workings of the company town is fascinating to behold, however the film doesn't always know where to direct our gaze.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Something haunting is going on here, but it's as difficult for the viewers as it is for the characters to sink their teeth into anything truly satisfying.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    As long as underdog sports stories hold a place in the cinematic universe, Eddie the Eagle, despite its shortcomings, will soar into moviegoers’ hearts.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Painfully dunderheaded about the proclivities of the human heart.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Danny Aiello and Robert Forster also turn up in tiny roles that further serve to distract attention from the real business at hand.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    It’s a perfectly nice period piece and biographical backgrounder, but the film feels as though it’s a meal of tasty side dishes that lacks a main course.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Loses something in its transposition to America where the two leads are not nearly as widely known as they are in their home country of France.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The film is wonderfully atmospheric and full of little frights, but its overall impact is only glancing.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Neither ditzy enough as comedy nor realistic enough as human drama to live a long life.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Teetering between folly and genius, this Will Ferrell comedy masquerading as a Mexican soap opera-cum-horse opera unfortunately levels off somewhere near the undistinguished center.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Never makes the leap from a little fantasy about sex with a stranger to a larger story about a woman settling down for life.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The story is so meandering and unbelievable that Westerners are still likely to roll their eyes. I have no idea what Indian audiences will make of Kites. The film is rousing, but it does not soar.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Marjorie Baumgarten
    As it is, Newt Knight, the forward-thinking white liberal, is the only character with whom we might connect. And that’s a shame because this compelling episode of American defiance is so much richer than that.

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