Marjorie Baumgarten
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For 1,448 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 35% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 63% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Marjorie Baumgarten's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 Pulp Fiction
Lowest review score: 0 The Last Sin Eater
Score distribution:
1,448 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    A bust-a-gut film experience that reveals Rodriguez as both a stylist versed in the mechanics of popular storytelling and a maverick whose ingenuity guides him along a singular path.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    These people and the tale of their migration and reintegration into life’s ebb and flow will remain with the viewer long after Johnny's and Sarah’s green cards expire.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Doesn’t provide any answers, and that’s both its strength and weakness.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The performances of all the central and secondary characters match the passionate intensity of the film's behind-the-scenes collaborators.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    LaBute's narrative structure and visual strategies are rigorously crafted, bespeaking an almost mathematical calculation that, in compellingly contradictory ways, both enhances the dramatic experience while undermining its very authenticity.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The movie occasionally continues on too long with certain scenes and may strain the sensibilities of anybody not caught up in its delirious visuals and melodrama, but The Saddest Music in the World nevertheless beckons with a seductive and unforgettable melody.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Watching and listening to these two is a charming experience; their conversation has the ring of veracity, and rarely does the viewer's interest stray.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Perception is key and Control Room should be required viewing for anyone within reach of a TV signal.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Among the many things that Baadasssss! is, it is also a movie about moviemaking. In fact, the film should be a primer for anyone about to make an independent film.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The movie is slight but transfixing.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Although the characters and their backstories are carefully thought out, Delpy and Hawke deliver their dialogue as if spontaneous and unmeditated.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    We've come to expect each new Demme film to percolate to an urgently musical beat. (The Manchurian Candidate also features a few cameos by musicians as diverse as Robyn Hitchcock and Fab Five Freddy.)
    • 85 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    It was the greatest rock & roll party you never heard of.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    A terrific piece of work.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Sometimes people grow up sane despite the best efforts of society to drive them mad. This is the case for filmmaker Jonathan Caouette.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Sharp scripting, note-perfect performances, and nimble direction and technical execution combine to make Wag the Dog one of the wittiest and most mordant political satires to come along in quite some time.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    A devastating portrait of impoverished Calucutta children.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    A real winner -- smart, funny, subtle, and resonant -- and there's not a hanging chad in sight.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The kind of movie that gets under your skin and takes root.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Nobody Knows is the rare film that successfully tells its tale of childhood from the children’s point of view.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Mary Harron's movie turns out to be anything but a sensationalistic bio-picture; it neither sanctifies nor demonizes the shooter or her famous victim. What the movie accomplishes is something trickier: It treats its two principals, Solanis and Warhol, with respect and humanity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    The film's content is adult – and for the first time in Araki's career, so is the director.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Co-directors Rubin and Shapiro deliver the rare documentary that totally entertains, informs, and inspires.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    At the very least, The Aristocrats provides a survey of some of the best comic minds in the business.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    A truly provocative essay.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    One of the most emotionally honest movies about drug addiction ever made.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Lodge Kerrigan is one of the great, though largely unheralded, filmmakers of our time, and with Keane, his third feature, he finally shows himself to be in full command of his uncompromising talent.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Keeping with the spirit of its lead characters, Oscar and Lucinda is a movie best met with a gambler's faith: You may not be certain what it means in the end, but its magnificent payoff is nevertheless a sure thing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    A History of Violence poses the right question: Are those who don't study history doomed to repeat it?
    • 80 Metascore
    • 89 Marjorie Baumgarten
    Langella is terrific in a small but critical role as CBS president William Paley, although the one essential problem with the film is that it never clearly delineates the jobs fulfilled by the cluster of other newsroom employees that are always huddled about.

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