For 249 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 90 A Touch of Sin
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 249
249 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    The documentary is powerful, as far as it goes, but would be stronger if the filmmakers had been able to follow the story further.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    Despite its fanciful premise, Never Let Me Go looks and feels utterly real.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    Despite some dark undercurrents, the movie emphasizes humor, and its best moments are more than kind of funny.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    Arguably the most dynamic Asian action film since the 1990s peaks of John Woo and Tsui Hark, The Raid: Redemption works as sheer gladiatorial ballet.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    As humane as it is disturbing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    His latest, the earthy yet subtly evocative 11 Flowers, is in the same mode as the one that's best known in the U.S., 2001's "Beijing Bicycle." Both are simple, resonant tales of youths who have something taken from them.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The Attorney can be melodramatic, and first-time feature director Yang Woo-seok is not yet a singular filmmaker. But the movie is carried by its rousing pro- democracy message and a lively performance from the versatile leading man.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Sensitive performances by the four main players suit the tone, which is naturalistic and even earthy — most of the characters are shown going to the bathroom — yet ultimately poignant.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    If the movie’s universal themes don’t impress, its specific details do.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    “Thunder” doesn’t boast a distinctive look or a cast of famous voices. But its characters are engaging and its action sequences exhilarating.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The moments when the guitarists teach the others their best-known riffs are fascinating.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Watching Lorna's attempt to balance self-interest and empathy can be heartbreaking. If Lorna's Silence as a whole doesn't rank among the Dardennes's best, it does follow the money to moments and characters that are unforgettable.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Police, Adjective has considerable power, and the issues it raises linger in the mind.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The movie's principal liability is that most of the music is highly derivative. Ghobadi spends a lot of time on songs that are more interesting sociologically than musically.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    A splendidly plotted if thematically unsurprising comedy. The pleasure comes not from fresh insights, but from a droll script and expertly timed performances.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    An evocative overview of anti-gay hysteria in the 1960s, a period when homosexuality was illegal in every state except Illinois.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Flashy and fun, and a nifty showcase for Yen.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The director recut the movie several times as events overtook it. She may yet do so again — although if more major changes occur, they could merit beginning another documentary. As The Square makes clear, Noujaim would not hesitate to rush back into the fray.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    And if the narrative does drag in places, Amalric and Del Toro could hardly be better; the contrast between their styles fits ideally the characters of excitable analyst and impassive patient.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    A Woman in Berlin doesn't justify retribution, but in such moments it does clarify the horrible logic of vengeance.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The movie's storytelling can be as old-fashioned as its appearance. Some sequences are quick and messy, but others are grand and theatrical.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    It's even harder being the semi-supportive wife, which is what generates most of the electricity in this slight but entertaining documentary.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    On balance, though, Turning Green is more fresh than stale. Gallery holds his own impressively with the better-known supporting players, and the script -- a Project Greenlight runner-up -- is solidly constructed.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The semi-autobiographical, microbudgeted Breaking Upwards is indeed precious. But it's also smart, witty and less self-absorbed than you might reasonably expect.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Quietly, the film makes the case that "enhanced interrogation techniques" were no enhancement. Interviewing jihadis "by the book," one interrogator testifies, yielded better information than violence and deprivation.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The movie ends powerfully, with a sudden pileup of fright, death and a disconcerting glimpse of beauty. If Lebanon's goal is to keep the viewer on edge and off balance, its final minutes are exemplary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    A fine overview, with enough new material to please Gould buffs. But the film fails to demonstrate that conventional biography is the best path to its subject's inner life.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Confrontational and hyperactive, Enter the Void is a difficult film to experience. That's not because Noe is somehow inept. The Argentina-born French writer-director knows exactly what he's doing and what effect his swirling camera, exuberant colors and strobelike effects will have.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Back in Canada, Dallaire tells a psychiatrist that he remembers Rwanda in flashbacks that are "not like memories at all." Shake Hands with the Devil captures something of that sensation; it's a depiction of events that are too painful to remember, too essential to forget.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The movie evokes its time and place so potently that it almost doesn't matter that Hamilton's script proves unequal to her vision.

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