For 249 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 90 Drug War
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 249
249 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    His latest, the earthy yet subtly evocative 11 Flowers, is in the same mode as the one that's best known in the U.S., 2001's "Beijing Bicycle." Both are simple, resonant tales of youths who have something taken from them.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    Despite some dark undercurrents, the movie emphasizes humor, and its best moments are more than kind of funny.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    As humane as it is disturbing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    The documentary is powerful, as far as it goes, but would be stronger if the filmmakers had been able to follow the story further.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    Arguably the most dynamic Asian action film since the 1990s peaks of John Woo and Tsui Hark, The Raid: Redemption works as sheer gladiatorial ballet.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Mark Jenkins
    Despite its fanciful premise, Never Let Me Go looks and feels utterly real.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The movie's principal liability is that most of the music is highly derivative. Ghobadi spends a lot of time on songs that are more interesting sociologically than musically.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Sensitive performances by the four main players suit the tone, which is naturalistic and even earthy — most of the characters are shown going to the bathroom — yet ultimately poignant.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Police, Adjective has considerable power, and the issues it raises linger in the mind.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Flashy and fun, and a nifty showcase for Yen.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    “Thunder” doesn’t boast a distinctive look or a cast of famous voices. But its characters are engaging and its action sequences exhilarating.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    A splendidly plotted if thematically unsurprising comedy. The pleasure comes not from fresh insights, but from a droll script and expertly timed performances.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    An evocative overview of anti-gay hysteria in the 1960s, a period when homosexuality was illegal in every state except Illinois.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    Watching Lorna's attempt to balance self-interest and empathy can be heartbreaking. If Lorna's Silence as a whole doesn't rank among the Dardennes's best, it does follow the money to moments and characters that are unforgettable.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The Attorney can be melodramatic, and first-time feature director Yang Woo-seok is not yet a singular filmmaker. But the movie is carried by its rousing pro- democracy message and a lively performance from the versatile leading man.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The moments when the guitarists teach the others their best-known riffs are fascinating.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    If the movie’s universal themes don’t impress, its specific details do.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    The director recut the movie several times as events overtook it. She may yet do so again — although if more major changes occur, they could merit beginning another documentary. As The Square makes clear, Noujaim would not hesitate to rush back into the fray.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Mark Jenkins
    And if the narrative does drag in places, Amalric and Del Toro could hardly be better; the contrast between their styles fits ideally the characters of excitable analyst and impassive patient.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Ultimately, Winocour does stage an instance of what could be called love. It's unconvincing narratively, alas, and an odd disruption of the tone in a film that is otherwise bracingly clinical.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    A veteran film editor making her first feature, Israel emphasizes the area's low-key beauty.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Tabloid spins a heck of a yarn, while implicitly warning viewers not to be so entertained that they believe every gamy detail.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Klapisch is a master of the half-biting, half-soothing farce, and he usually keeps the divergent tones in harmony.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Would be more satisfying if it were a more definitive look at Guantanamo's workings. All Cote and Henriquez can provide is some glimmers of insight about just one of the men held there. But that's enough to make their movie enlightening, compelling and, finally, heartbreaking.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The Salt of Life is easygoing and naturalistic, but clearly a work of imagination.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Quietly astonishing documentary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The Big Picture has been compared to "The Talented Mr. Ripley," the twice-filmed Patricia Highsmith novel about a sociopath who kills and then impersonates a rich acquaintance. But in spirit it's closer to Michelangelo Antonioni's 1975 "The Passenger," with Jack Nicholson as an existential adventurer who poses as a dead stranger.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Not even the presence of a goth-chick hotel clerk could turn Nobody Else But You into "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo." The movie may teeter on the edge of Switzerland, but its playful sensibility is entirely French.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The movie's first word is oishi, Japanese for "delicious," and what follows is a treat for sushi veterans. First-timers, however, may wish for a little more context.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Quietly, the film makes the case that "enhanced interrogation techniques" were no enhancement. Interviewing jihadis "by the book," one interrogator testifies, yielded better information than violence and deprivation.

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