For 232 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 90 A Touch of Sin
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 12 out of 232
232 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    Quite aside from Shinto transformation parables or Buddhist reincarnation teachings, the final scene shows how family wisdom is conserved and recycled. It's a moment that might elicit a smile or a tear, or perhaps both.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    Any film about a flashy criminal threatens to glamorize its protagonist, but both Mesrine episodes are careful to detail the many goofs made by the crook and his accomplices.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    Wild Grass is an elegant vessel for outlandish thoughts and troubling impulses. In his rejection of cinematic naturalism, Resnais has made a movie that's both utterly contrived and compellingly lifelike.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    Although the monks don't seek death, Of Gods And Men can be seen as an ode to religiously motivated self-sacrifice. But Beauvois deliberately leaves the story open-ended. The value of these men's lives, he's noting, is not defined by how they ended.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    Its greatest advantage over the book is that this is a story well-documented in moving pictures. In addition to recent interviews with the five, the filmmakers deftly marshal news footage, clips from the supposed confessions, and trenchant analysis.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    As Arbor, nonprofessional actor Chapman gives one of the fiercest performances of this kind since Martin Compston's turn as a different sort of teenage entrepreneur in Loach's 2002 film "Sweet Sixteen." He's riveting, even in his final moment of calm.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    A Touch of Sin is the most dramatic and even lurid of writer-director Jia Zhangke's movies. The film-festival star hasn't quite become a Chinese Tarantino, however.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Mark Jenkins
    Evil cannot triumph in a movie made in China, but Drug War's ultimate scene nonetheless manages to astonish, revealing both Choi's character and the nature of mainland justice. Rather than dodging the harshness of Chinese authority, To depicts it implacably. He does exactly what the censors want, and yet subverts their worldview.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    While the story pivots on an actual girl-who-cried-wolf incident, this elegantly constructed movie is about much more than that.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Like "The Big Sleep," Micmacs tells a tangled story that may be just too much for some viewers. But the film moves nimbly, has an exuberant sense of style and is leavened by comic asides, many of them strictly visual. (The movie would be plenty of fun even without the subtitles.)
    • 74 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    The movie is a curiosity, of course. Both Marc and Kim have decidedly unusual life stories.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    It's a surprisingly nuanced and sober tale of brotherhood and betrayal.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Sergio Leone learns to speak Korean in The Good, the Bad, the Weird, an exuberant tale of greed, vengeance and, well, weirdness.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Most of the dialogue is invented, but the sweep of events is genuine.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    If the movie's mix of nihilistic violence and snarky attitude suggests "In Bruges," it's a family resemblance. The writer-director of that film, which also starred Gleeson, is Martin McDonagh, the younger brother of this one's. Despite the similarities, the older McDonagh has a lighter touch. Where "In Bruges" ultimately became a mechanical bloodbath, The Guard scampers quickly through the action scenes, delivering commentary on genre conventions as it goes.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    The Empire State's eminent domain laws are unusually loose, but most of the rest of this story is pertinent far beyond New York. Change a few names and add the next credit bubble, and a Brooklyn-style Battle could be headed to a neighborhood near you.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Ruiz, whose best-known films include his 1999 adaptation of Proust's "Time Regained," coolly roams the ambiguous territories between tragedy and soap opera, and between the traditional and the modern.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    The movie is not a story but a text, and Cedar is its playfully intrusive interpreter.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    We Have a Pope is not the filmmaker's next assault on a Roman patriarch. It's a half-sweet, half-rueful existential drama in which the satire comes secondary.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    The Turin Horse is an absolute vision, masterly and enveloping in a way that less personal, more conventional movies are not. The film doesn't seduce; it commands.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Ai is a great movie subject for many reasons, but one is that he understands the power of appearing larger than life on the silver screen.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    In Hollywood these days, such epic transformations are rendered with computers and called "morphing." Offering a lesson both to filmmakers and climate-change deniers, Chasing Ice demonstrates how much more powerful it is to capture the real thing.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Although it's the fourth documentary about the West Memphis Three, West of Memphis doesn't feel superfluous. This bizarre case rates at least 18 documentaries - one for each year Damien Echols, Jason Baldwin and Jessie Misskelley spent in prison for murders they clearly didn't commit.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    The movie revisits the themes (and some of the same characters) of Amy Berg's chilling 2006 chronicle "Deliver Us from Evil." But it reaches further, expanding from one American diocese to Ireland, Italy, the Vatican and the career of the current pope.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Even the movie's title, or rather the source of it, is a surprise. Not to spoil the fun, but it's neither Assange nor one of his allies who nonchalantly acknowledges that "we steal secrets."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    One thing Doueiri didn't get from Tarantino is smirky attitude; The Attack is sad and resigned, but also tender.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Big Star was essentially Chris Bell's band, and emotionally, Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me is Bell's movie. Joining rock's dead-at-27 club via a 1978 car crash, he left behind a fine, then-unreleased album and two siblings who tell his story movingly. As they recount his final years, the sadness in Bell's songs comes to seem eerily prescient.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Only the genre's most studious followers will be able to watch Muscle Shoals without being regularly astonished: Even if it sometimes gets lost in its byways, Greg "Freddy" Camalier's documentary tells an extraordinary story.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 85 Mark Jenkins
    Wadjda offers an interesting contrast to films made in Iran. Where the latter country has a long cinematic tradition, Mansour's is the first feature shot entirely in Saudi Arabia.