For 264 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 90 Drug War
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 19 out of 264
264 movie reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    But c'mon! Erotic obsession, catfights, naked chicks making out -- at heart Chloe is a midnight movie, and all the Vivaldi in the world can't change that.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Reich has a good sense of humor, as is virtually required of an adult who's less than 5 feet tall — he has Fairbanks disease, the same condition that accounts for Danny DeVito's stature — so he's pretty much guaranteed a laugh when he hops to his feet and asks if he looks like an advocate of "big government."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Music drives the movie, and the producers popped for the real stuff: Robert Johnson, Moby Grape and - curiously - the Sex Pistols are all here. The soundtrack is so overstuffed that it relegates Beatles and Dylan tunes to the end credits.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    There's plenty of material for a lively, profound documentary about Norman Foster. But How Much Does Your Building Weigh, Mr. Foster? is, by design, lightweight.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    "Driving Miss Daisy" this ain't. Except that it sort of is.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Set in a high-tech yet shabby future, the remake of Total Recall is a fully realized piece of production design. But its script, credited to six authors, is more like a preliminary sketch.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Shanghai is an exercise in retro glamour, alluring decadence and tough-guy posing, all of which it delivers in sufficient quantities.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    In the wake of numerous documentaries and a big-budget film, writer-director Clare Lewins can find little fresh material.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Unfortunately, brutality is about all this update of 1941's The Wolf Man can do well. Mutilations, decapitations and disembowelments are handled with aplomb in the first R-rated film from director Joe Johnston (Jumanji, Jurassic Park III). But everything that doesn't involve gore feels like an afterthought.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Set to Jeremy Turner's spare and mournful score, Narco Cultura is ultimately more pensive than lurid.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Too much of this seething drama is devoted not to characterization but to posturing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Perhaps seeking to retain something of the book’s rhythm, Knight and Hallstrom let a very simple story meander for two hours and include episodes that serve no dramatic purpose.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Like the recent "Mud," The Kings of Summer is a tale of feral adolescent pals in search of freedom and adventure. The movies even share essentially the same awkwardly contrived climax. But of the two films, The Kings of Summer is more of a comedy, with a depiction of the eternal war between teen and parent that's downright farcical.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Like “The Intouchables,” Samba is loosely plotted and is at least 20 minutes too long. It seems ready to end half a dozen times before it finally does, with ironic payoffs for Samba and Alice that are too glib to be satisfying.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    A theological trifle that ultimately twists itself into a romantic comedy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    "Humanize" might not seem the obvious verb for what happens in Chimpanzee, Disneynature's latest kiddie documentary. But it's dead on; this escape to the planet of the apes is anthropomorphic to a fault.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Austrian documentarian Michael Glawogger's Whore's Glory is no "Pretty Woman." But neither does it qualify as an expose.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Perhaps the clearest evidence that Yelling to the Sky is based on Mahoney's own life is that the movie lets its most troubled characters off pretty easy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    However much Uxbal tries to help Barcelona's dispossessed, Biutiful doesn't really have anything to say about the modern world's economic migrants. Indeed, it could even be said that the movie exploits them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    The movie is less than incisive, but it's utterly well-meaning.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    After evoking only warm smiles in its first half, Le Chef ultimately veers into farce.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    A Brilliant Young Mind is less stuffy than the usual cinematic ode to British smarts and schooling. But that still can’t save this tale of eccentric genius from being profoundly conventional.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    There are some funny bits and characters around the edges of The Incredible Burt Wonderstone, but its core is empty of humor. In fact, this purported satire of Las Vegas magicians is a three-void circus: the script, the central character and the main performance.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    This slackers-go-gangsta comedy demonstrates that less than 90 minutes can be a very long time.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    In the real world or a realer movie, the deceitful Arthur and the larcenous Mike would eventually get in big trouble. Yet this road movie is headed not toward serious consequences, but toward docile acceptance. In spirit, it turns out, Arthur Newman is a pretty much a Wallace Avery.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    Director Neil Burger, whose last divergent character was the smart-drugged protagonist of Limitless, allocates more than enough of this overlong movie to details of life and society in future-Chicagoland. But he fails to make any aspect of the premise persuasive.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    If the movie fails to conjure soiled 19th-century Paris, that's not primarily because it was shot in Hungary and Serbia. More problematic are the English-language dialogue and actors who speak in a variety of accents and perform in a range of styles.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    Never before has a movie's direction and script lagged so far behind the actor's hapless persona. If Fraser's character is a human Wile E. Coyote, director Roger Kumble is barely Elmer Fudd.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    It's a strange sort of film that casts Gallic tough guy Jean Reno as a clean-fingernailed mogul while employing cross-dressing comic Tyler Perry as a guy capable of hand-to-hand combat with someone called The Butcher of Sligo.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    The newest model of the old submarine-from-hell picture.

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