For 248 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 90 A Touch of Sin
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 248
248 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Like the recent "Mud," The Kings of Summer is a tale of feral adolescent pals in search of freedom and adventure. The movies even share essentially the same awkwardly contrived climax. But of the two films, The Kings of Summer is more of a comedy, with a depiction of the eternal war between teen and parent that's downright farcical.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Hypermacho but tongue-in-cheek, the first 20 minutes of 2 Guns are enormous fun.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    A 90-minute biography can't include everything, of course. But Lovelace comes on like an inquiry into the '70s zeitgeist, only to retreat into melodrama. Ultimately, the movie relies as heavily as any porn feature on its intrepid female lead. Rather than exploiting Seyfried, however, Lovelace just sort of wastes her.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Aside from the giggles induced by the romance-novel bits, the movie's principal hazard is exhaustion. There are too many characters, and too many of them spend too much time morphing into something else. Five more like this? That would be demonic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Reich has a good sense of humor, as is virtually required of an adult who's less than 5 feet tall — he has Fairbanks disease, the same condition that accounts for Danny DeVito's stature — so he's pretty much guaranteed a laugh when he hops to his feet and asks if he looks like an advocate of "big government."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Set to Jeremy Turner's spare and mournful score, Narco Cultura is ultimately more pensive than lurid.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    If Nenette as a character is more a narrative convenience than a depiction of an actual condition, her permanent childhood does provide the 63-year-old Balasko with an exuberant, unpredictable role. That she continues to make work for herself as both an actress and a director is a good thing, but it would be better if she found a more ambitious writer.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    This slackers-go-gangsta comedy demonstrates that less than 90 minutes can be a very long time.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    There are some funny bits and characters around the edges of The Incredible Burt Wonderstone, but its core is empty of humor. In fact, this purported satire of Las Vegas magicians is a three-void circus: the script, the central character and the main performance.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    In the real world or a realer movie, the deceitful Arthur and the larcenous Mike would eventually get in big trouble. Yet this road movie is headed not toward serious consequences, but toward docile acceptance. In spirit, it turns out, Arthur Newman is a pretty much a Wallace Avery.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    If the movie fails to conjure soiled 19th-century Paris, that's not primarily because it was shot in Hungary and Serbia. More problematic are the English-language dialogue and actors who speak in a variety of accents and perform in a range of styles.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 45 Mark Jenkins
    Director Neil Burger, whose last divergent character was the smart-drugged protagonist of Limitless, allocates more than enough of this overlong movie to details of life and society in future-Chicagoland. But he fails to make any aspect of the premise persuasive.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    If that's the best Hollywood screenwriters can do, maybe they should sign up for a self-help seminar. Nothing focuses the mind like a little firewalking.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    We're supposed to be awed, but a more reasonable response is to giggle. How does a Kevlar tie kill? And if it can, why hasn't the CIA sent a Kevlar scarf to Osama bin Laden?
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    At heart, though, the movie is as tame as "The Belles of St. Trinian's," the 1954 farce that started it all.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    Never before has a movie's direction and script lagged so far behind the actor's hapless persona. If Fraser's character is a human Wile E. Coyote, director Roger Kumble is barely Elmer Fudd.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    What Newell can't seem to do is give Prince of Persia a unifying style, tone or purpose. The film moves well, but doesn't show any motivation other than getting to the next game level.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    This ode to "moving on" from grief packs so little genuine emotion that it will touch only the most susceptible of viewers.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    It's a strange sort of film that casts Gallic tough guy Jean Reno as a clean-fingernailed mogul while employing cross-dressing comic Tyler Perry as a guy capable of hand-to-hand combat with someone called The Butcher of Sligo.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Mark Jenkins
    The newest model of the old submarine-from-hell picture.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 37 Mark Jenkins
    Although Boniadi makes Shirin nearly as likable as she’s supposed to be, writer-director Ramin Niami’s movie is crudely contrived and sloppily edited.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 37 Mark Jenkins
    Intriguingly, Jinn makes a plea for understanding and cooperation between Muslims, Jews and Christians. Disappointingly, writer-director Ajmal Zaheer Ahmad does all too good a job burying that message within a blustering supernatural thriller.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 37 Mark Jenkins
    Whether it’s being sexy, jokey or homicidal, Stage Fright doesn’t deliver the goods with sufficient spirit. It lacks the sparkle to be a truly killer show.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 37 Mark Jenkins
    America is less successful as a debate, since it isn’t one. D’Souza controls the conversation, and thus goes unchallenged when he tries to make real-world points with make-believe scenarios.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 37 Mark Jenkins
    First-time director Trish Sie, a music-video veteran, is more interested in spectacle than character, as she demonstrates even when nobody’s dancing.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 37 Mark Jenkins
    As Above, So Below is inherently absurd, but it would be somewhat less so had it fully committed to just one of its ridiculous premises.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 35 Mark Jenkins
    First-time feature director Peter Billingsley could have enlivened the action with more vigorous editing. Everything takes too long, and the slapstick sequences are particularly lethargic.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 35 Mark Jenkins
    Indeed, despite occasional attempts at plot and character, this is basically a roast with scenery.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 35 Mark Jenkins
    The movie maintains its sense of style throughout, but that hardly matters as the story just gets stupider and stupider.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 35 Mark Jenkins
    A disastrous father-son endeavor about a calamitous father-son expedition, After Earth doesn't play to the strengths of any of its major participants.