For 276 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 90 Of Gods and Men
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 21 out of 276
276 movie reviews
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    A veteran film editor making her first feature, Israel emphasizes the area's low-key beauty.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Tabloid spins a heck of a yarn, while implicitly warning viewers not to be so entertained that they believe every gamy detail.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Klapisch is a master of the half-biting, half-soothing farce, and he usually keeps the divergent tones in harmony.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Would be more satisfying if it were a more definitive look at Guantanamo's workings. All Cote and Henriquez can provide is some glimmers of insight about just one of the men held there. But that's enough to make their movie enlightening, compelling and, finally, heartbreaking.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The Salt of Life is easygoing and naturalistic, but clearly a work of imagination.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Quietly astonishing documentary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The Big Picture has been compared to "The Talented Mr. Ripley," the twice-filmed Patricia Highsmith novel about a sociopath who kills and then impersonates a rich acquaintance. But in spirit it's closer to Michelangelo Antonioni's 1975 "The Passenger," with Jack Nicholson as an existential adventurer who poses as a dead stranger.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Not even the presence of a goth-chick hotel clerk could turn Nobody Else But You into "The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo." The movie may teeter on the edge of Switzerland, but its playful sensibility is entirely French.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The movie's first word is oishi, Japanese for "delicious," and what follows is a treat for sushi veterans. First-timers, however, may wish for a little more context.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Quietly, the film makes the case that "enhanced interrogation techniques" were no enhancement. Interviewing jihadis "by the book," one interrogator testifies, yielded better information than violence and deprivation.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Canner's eye-opening, entertaining account of the search for the little pill that supplies the Big O is looney-tunes enough without the cartoon asides.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Strange and uncompromisingly personal. It's also vivid and unforgettable.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Back in Canada, Dallaire tells a psychiatrist that he remembers Rwanda in flashbacks that are "not like memories at all." Shake Hands with the Devil captures something of that sensation; it's a depiction of events that are too painful to remember, too essential to forget.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The semi-autobiographical, microbudgeted Breaking Upwards is indeed precious. But it's also smart, witty and less self-absorbed than you might reasonably expect.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Before settling into such comfortable territory, however, the movie is propulsive and involving. If The Company You Keep is far from radical, it's pretty audacious by the standards of counterrevolutionary Hollywood.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Kore-eda is himself a father now, which may explain why his work has gotten sunnier.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The Pirogue spends only about an hour on open water, but that's enough to convey the risks that make the trip foolish, and the desperation that makes it inevitable.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Film Socialisme, his (Godard) latest intellectual assault, includes grating noise, scruffy camera-phone video and subtitles in fractured "Navajo English."
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The story is carefully constructed, with moments that seem offhand initially, but are later revealed as crucial.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The result is complex yet lighthearted, as diverting as it is meditative. Resnais uses contrapuntal editing — one of his trademarks — as well as artificial settings, special effects, split screens, cinematic references and anachronistic devices to keep viewers tipsily off-balance.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Dragon is partly an homage to "One Armed Swordsman," a 1967 kung fu classic whose star, Jimmy Wang Yu, plays the new movie's arch-villain. But there's much Western influence: Jinxi's plight recalls David Cronenberg's "A History of Violence," and Baijiu's cerebral and flashy style of detection - complete with animated glimpses of victims' innards - suggests Guy Ritchie's Sherlock Holmes series. Dragon is also one of several recent Chinese crime movies that borrow from CSI-style TV dramas.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The film, while unfailingly entertaining, feels a little small for its subject.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    To devotees of Al Gore's prophecy of a soon-to-be-parboiled Earth, "Skeptical Environmentalist" author Bjorn Lomborg is the devil. So what does an ecologically incorrect demon look like? Like an aging Danish surfer dude, it turns out.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    This mashup of genres and themes doesn't entirely succeed, but it is warm, funny and ably crafted.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    DeNoble aside, Addiction Incorporated finds most of its heroes in Congress, the White House and federal agencies.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The movie's storytelling can be as old-fashioned as its appearance. Some sequences are quick and messy, but others are grand and theatrical.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The movie evokes its time and place so potently that it almost doesn't matter that Hamilton's script proves unequal to her vision.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    On balance, though, Turning Green is more fresh than stale. Gallery holds his own impressively with the better-known supporting players, and the script -- a Project Greenlight runner-up -- is solidly constructed.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The movie ends powerfully, with a sudden pileup of fright, death and a disconcerting glimpse of beauty. If Lebanon's goal is to keep the viewer on edge and off balance, its final minutes are exemplary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Succeeds as a character study, while gently raising questions about human use and misuse of animals.

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