For 249 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 90 A Touch of Sin
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 249
249 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Before settling into such comfortable territory, however, the movie is propulsive and involving. If The Company You Keep is far from radical, it's pretty audacious by the standards of counterrevolutionary Hollywood.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Ultimately, Winocour does stage an instance of what could be called love. It's unconvincing narratively, alas, and an odd disruption of the tone in a film that is otherwise bracingly clinical.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    The result is complex yet lighthearted, as diverting as it is meditative. Resnais uses contrapuntal editing — one of his trademarks — as well as artificial settings, special effects, split screens, cinematic references and anachronistic devices to keep viewers tipsily off-balance.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Those who don't savor Cohen's leisurely rhythms will probably not respond to Museum Hours, and even the movie's admirers will admit that it could be a little tighter. One scene that might be trimmed is the one where museum-goers pose, naked as the people on the canvases around them. The interlude certainly isn't dull, but it is a little brazen for a film that encourages its viewers to find the beauty in more commonplace sights.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Over the nine months the movie chronicles, about half the refugees leave the school building. Many return to the Fukushima area, but none to Futaba, which is still radioactive and officially off-limits.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Yes, The Rocket is a sports movie, with an outcome that's easily foreseen. The cultural specifics of this Laos-set tale, however, are far less predictable.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    Kore-eda is himself a father now, which may explain why his work has gotten sunnier.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Mark Jenkins
    That the same performers keep returning in different roles, playing Peruvian and Japanese flyers as well as American ones, only adds to the sense of man as machine. Everything, and everyone, must run like clockwork. Yet no apparatus is foolproof.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    The movie poignantly demonstrates that, 41 years after Stonewall, there are still places in this country where gay people cannot simply be themselves.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Despite the contrived climax, I Am Love has emotional power. The contrast between duty and passion is well-drawn, and Swinton's transition from winter matriarch to springtime lover is compelling, even if the circumstances are implausible.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Slight but engaging, and considerably energized by its two young leads, Daly's Kisses gives several fresh spins to one of Irish cinema's most common recent subjects: troubled working-class children on the lam.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Ideally, The Taqwacores should be seen with "Taqwacore: The Birth of Punk Islam," a new documentary that provides a better sense of the scene's aims and motivations. Zahra's jumpy feature film captures much of taqwacore's energy, but less of its meaning.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    This is the story of two young people whose aspirations are of absolutely no interest to their elders. Zero Bridge is a fitting found title for the movie, but Tapa could also have called it No Exit.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    There's nothing unexpected in this well-made picture, aside from the name of the director: Takeshi Miike.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Perhaps because he's an actor, Rapaport prefers drama to analysis. And this story has plenty of conflict.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Neither innovative nor profound, but it is kinetic, visceral and sometimes moving.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Perhaps the ending worked better in the book, Muriel Barbery's The Elegance of the Hedgehog, which sold more than a million copies in France. Certainly this adaptation, Mona Achache's directorial debut, is a very bookish movie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Deeply silly in a classic mode, The Fairy continues the French new wave of near-silent cinema.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Post Mortem is - intentionally - not an engaging movie. And Larrain sometimes overplays the existential anguish, notably during a few scenes of joyless, mechanical sexual release.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Predictable but appealing, Trouble with the Curve is the latest of Clint Eastwood's odes to old-fashioned attitudes and virtues.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Reportedly, the movie's humor relies heavily on Cantonese slang and profanity, which will be lost on most American viewers. But Quin's rapid-fire bilingualism gives some sense of the movie's verbal dexterity.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    The dialogue is merely functional, and not always delivered convincingly.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Relocating Dangerous Liaisons, the 18th-century French erotic intrigue, to 1930s Shanghai is a bold move. And yet it's not especially surprising. In Chinese movies, that city in that decade frequently serves as shorthand for decadence.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Although the story is told with narration rather than dialogue, Tobias relies too much on reconstruction. A more inventive melding of documentary and docudrama would have benefited the film, whose most moving scenes all involve real members of the families. A bit more historical and geographic context would also be useful.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Herman's House would benefit from more background material on Wallace, notably about the alleged weakness of the murder rap against him. In the end, though, neither Sumell nor the film is concerned with that. Their goal is to make palpable — and palpably horrific — the fact of living 23 hours a day in caged isolation.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    The documentary's most memorable vignette is suitably unnerving: a visit to northern China, where the threatened disappearance of bees has already come to pass, leaving workers to pollinate fruit trees ... by hand.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    A waka is a traditional Japanese style of poetry, and this documentary does take a lyrical approach. Although barely an hour long, Tokyo Waka leaves room for offhand observations and humorous asides.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    While Populaire would still have suffered from being overlong and overfamiliar, a smoother leading man could have done much to boost the intended Cary Grant vibe.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    As The Fifth Estate excitedly illustrates, in the Internet age no one can ever really have the last word.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 65 Mark Jenkins
    Because it serves up Armageddon with a side order of teen romance, How I Live Now is not always credible. But as a portrait of a surly 16-year-old whose internal crisis is overtaken by an external one, the movie is persuasive.

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