For 247 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 90 Wild Grass
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 18 out of 247
247 movie reviews
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Provocative yet far from definitive, Pink Ribbons, Inc. is a critique of "breast-cancer culture." It could even be called a blitz on pink-ribbon charities and their corporate partners - though to use that term would be to emulate the war and sports metaphors the documentary rejects.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    By concentrating so intently on the psychically unattached Joby, Kim hinders dramatic and character development. Her "Treeless Mountain," the Korea-set saga of two young sisters, was also quiet and open-ended. But the interplay between the two girls provided warmth and depth. For Ellen feels both colder and slighter.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    The House I Live In shows Nannie Jeter as she hopefully watches Barack Obama's 2008 electoral victory, but doesn't analyze the current president's apparent reluctance to significantly alter anti-drug policies.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    In a rare bit of explication, the movie notes that "buffalo" has two connotations in Thailand. For rural folks, it refers to the strength and perseverance of the large animals, called "kwai" in Thai. To urbanites, however, a buffalo is a hick.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    This China/Hong Kong co-production flips the formula: The fantastic images are solid, but the action is less substantial.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Teresa's doggedness parallels the movie's own. Paradise: Love would be more compelling if it had a second act in which either its protagonist or one of her boy toys came to some sort of realization. Instead, Seidl's strategy is to reiterate and escalate, which is finally more exhausting than illuminating.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Winterbottom's 2004 film "9 Songs" is the most sexually explicit picture ever to get general release in Britain. Oddly, given its subject matter, The Look of Love turns out to be much tamer; as Raymond's shows and magazines become raunchier, the director sidesteps or actively censors the steamiest material.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    Rickman is too theatrical, and too British, to vanish entirely into the person of Hilly Kristal. But he's entertaining to watch, and ultimately one of the more persuasive actors in a movie that suffers from as many odd casting decisions as Lee Daniels' The Butler.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Mark Jenkins
    German history and culture are among Sokurov's concerns in this visually compelling, intellectually scattershot movie.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    The original was a little sharper, with actual satirical swipes at modern British life. The remake replaces some of that material with lazy pop-culture gags, most of them specifically African-American.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Brand's character, who combines Bono's moral sanctimony with Keith Richards' supernatural hedonism, ultimately doesn't add up.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Directed by Neil Burger, whose "The Illusionist" also pulled an upbeat coda out of a hat, Limitless is entertaining for much of its running time. It's glib, and it's overly fond of hyperdrive pans, psychedelic montages and swift rack-focus shifts.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    This is among the better Allen knockoffs of recent years, even if a few of its riffs seem hazardously off-key.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    The glib story and hectoring structure undermine the filmmakers' best intentions.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    A Good Old Fashioned Orgy deserves credit for not entirely wimping out.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    For those already somewhat familiar with the subject, the directors' distillation of these 40 hours of film will expand their knowledge - if not their consciousness. But other viewers may spend the whole movie wondering exactly when the merry magic is going to kick in.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    It's a campy rampage that runs a few minutes shy of four hours, dooming what otherwise would likely be a bright future as a midnight movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    It's the sort of well-meaning fable that's ultimately more admirable than persuasive.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    It's populated by characters who are just too good to be plausible.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    The movie's violence, although gruesome, flirts with slapstick, and the story appears bound for domestic comedy when all the major characters sit down for Thanksgiving dinner at June and Chet's grand Victorian farmhouse. But the meal becomes more freak show than satire.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    J.H. Wyman's script is grim and fairly audacious, without anything so goofy as the silliest stuff in "Dragon Tattoo." The story involves some Grand Guignol violence, but its wildest notion is that a suicide-mission plot might somehow yield a happy ending.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Orchestra of Exiles will interest anyone who's concerned with European Jewry or classical music in the first half of the 20th century. But it provides mostly the facts of Huberman's legacy and little of the flavor.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    So the principal point of controversy involved here is not Jobs himself, but Ashton Kutcher, who plays him. The actor's approach is to ape Jobs' speech and movements, which he does quite well. Whether mimicry qualifies as characterization is a question for Jobs' viewers to answer for themselves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Many of the White House scenes are jarringly motley, as Whitaker maintains Gaines' dignity against a series of performances that range from bland (James Marsden's JFK) to cartoonish (Liev Schreiber's LBJ). It comes as a relief when Daniels reduces Jimmy Carter and Gerald Ford to TV clips — though that strategy makes the film even more of a stylistic jumble.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    The film was shot entirely in South Africa, and revels in golden light on dry yellow grasslands. But it's still a very British movie, a respectful view from a suitable distance.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    DeChristopher's primary concern is climate change, which is no small issue. But Bidder 70 would be more compelling if it had used the U.S. government's assault on the ad hoc activist to also discuss threats to the American political environment.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Cooper does slow the action and set it in the least glamorous of circumstances, which drains the pleasure from the thriller conventions. But just because Out of the Furnace isn't much fun doesn't make it profound.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    While Europa Report recalls such small-ensemble stuck-in-space flicks as "Moon" and "Sunshine," it's basically "The Blair Witch Project" relocated to the vicinity of Jupiter.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Basically the anti-"Kill Bill." Both movies are quilted together from their auteurs' favorite Asian action flicks, but where Tarantino's was overheated, Reeves' is elegantly iced.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 55 Mark Jenkins
    Zaytoun is different: This time, the director allows his characters to cross the frontier. That makes for a story that's sweeter, but also less convincing.