For 276 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 51% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mark Jenkins' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 90 The Central Park Five
Lowest review score: 5 Grown Ups 2
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 21 out of 276
276 movie reviews
    • 16 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Snow Zou’s directorial debut does have a few noteworthy attributes: attractive stars, sun-dappled cinematography and an audacious payoff.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Pretty but inert, To the Wonder is a vaporous mystery wrapped in a gauzy enigma — a cinematic riddle that'll appeal principally to those eager for another piece, however tiny, of the puzzle that is Terrence Malick.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    The movie presents grim assessments from such experts as the Pacific Institute's Peter Gleick and professor and author Robert Glennon, yet it ends with a flurry of hopeful notes.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Despite numerous missteps and contrivances, Olvidados succeeds as an indictment of Operation Condor’s horrors.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    It's hard to make a movie about a pederast without being exploitative, and Michael eventually comes to feel like an art house stunt.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    If nothing else, while watching Ruppert, you'll believe he believes this stuff.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Despite dramatic Hawaiian locations, up-to-date visual effects and a bit of nontraditional casting, the movie feels not especially brave and far from new.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Miral stumbles, both thematically and stylistically. The two things that undermine the director's balance? Peace and love.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    As is typical of the genre, the plot gets sillier as it unfolds, while the violence gets gnarlier.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    The movie wavers in tone, occasionally lurching into supernatural fantasy, and withholds information in a manner that’s more annoying than tantalizing.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    But c'mon! Erotic obsession, catfights, naked chicks making out -- at heart Chloe is a midnight movie, and all the Vivaldi in the world can't change that.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Reich has a good sense of humor, as is virtually required of an adult who's less than 5 feet tall — he has Fairbanks disease, the same condition that accounts for Danny DeVito's stature — so he's pretty much guaranteed a laugh when he hops to his feet and asks if he looks like an advocate of "big government."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Music drives the movie, and the producers popped for the real stuff: Robert Johnson, Moby Grape and - curiously - the Sex Pistols are all here. The soundtrack is so overstuffed that it relegates Beatles and Dylan tunes to the end credits.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    There's plenty of material for a lively, profound documentary about Norman Foster. But How Much Does Your Building Weigh, Mr. Foster? is, by design, lightweight.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    "Driving Miss Daisy" this ain't. Except that it sort of is.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Set in a high-tech yet shabby future, the remake of Total Recall is a fully realized piece of production design. But its script, credited to six authors, is more like a preliminary sketch.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Shanghai is an exercise in retro glamour, alluring decadence and tough-guy posing, all of which it delivers in sufficient quantities.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    In the wake of numerous documentaries and a big-budget film, writer-director Clare Lewins can find little fresh material.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Unfortunately, brutality is about all this update of 1941's The Wolf Man can do well. Mutilations, decapitations and disembowelments are handled with aplomb in the first R-rated film from director Joe Johnston (Jumanji, Jurassic Park III). But everything that doesn't involve gore feels like an afterthought.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Set to Jeremy Turner's spare and mournful score, Narco Cultura is ultimately more pensive than lurid.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Too much of this seething drama is devoted not to characterization but to posturing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Perhaps seeking to retain something of the book’s rhythm, Knight and Hallstrom let a very simple story meander for two hours and include episodes that serve no dramatic purpose.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Like the recent "Mud," The Kings of Summer is a tale of feral adolescent pals in search of freedom and adventure. The movies even share essentially the same awkwardly contrived climax. But of the two films, The Kings of Summer is more of a comedy, with a depiction of the eternal war between teen and parent that's downright farcical.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Like “The Intouchables,” Samba is loosely plotted and is at least 20 minutes too long. It seems ready to end half a dozen times before it finally does, with ironic payoffs for Samba and Alice that are too glib to be satisfying.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    A theological trifle that ultimately twists itself into a romantic comedy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    "Humanize" might not seem the obvious verb for what happens in Chimpanzee, Disneynature's latest kiddie documentary. But it's dead on; this escape to the planet of the apes is anthropomorphic to a fault.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Austrian documentarian Michael Glawogger's Whore's Glory is no "Pretty Woman." But neither does it qualify as an expose.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    Perhaps the clearest evidence that Yelling to the Sky is based on Mahoney's own life is that the movie lets its most troubled characters off pretty easy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    However much Uxbal tries to help Barcelona's dispossessed, Biutiful doesn't really have anything to say about the modern world's economic migrants. Indeed, it could even be said that the movie exploits them.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Mark Jenkins
    The movie is less than incisive, but it's utterly well-meaning.

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