For 84 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 38% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 14.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Martin Tsai's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 45
Highest review score: 80 Fort Bliss
Lowest review score: 10 Poseidon Rex
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 15 out of 84
  2. Negative: 29 out of 84
84 movie reviews
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    Miss Lovely does exude an air of authenticity... But much of the film remains underdeveloped.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    One Candle, Two Candles proves worthwhile at least as a cultural curio.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    This journey into "Martha Marcy May Marlene" territory is never as tense and gripping as it should be, the incidents and most of the performances too tamped-down to spark a much-needed sense of animating friction.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    By allowing Cameron's first-person account to take command of the narrative, though, the film seems to gloss over meaningful logistics of the expedition.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    This cautionary tale certainly has a chilling and timely message of how wars make monsters out of innocent people. But using reductive caricatures — complete with phlegmatic performances — to send that message is perhaps not the best way, because it turns something with modern-day implications into distant allegory.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    The film feels like a sketch rather than a portrait, beautifully rendered but incomplete in the details.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    The film's colorblindness does not make up for its latent sexism.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    If "The Bible" was CliffsNotes for the Scriptures, Son of God is the cheat sheet. The two-hour film condenses about four hours of what already was hasty television, and it all winds up a little dramatically static.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    Like many found-footage films before it, The Den never entirely suspends disbelief. It doesn't satisfyingly account for how the characters are producing all the footage.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    Not unlike most of its Hollywood counterparts, though, this Hong Kong import can't resist the urge to dumb down a fascinating premise for the sake of mass consumption.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    The film blurs lines between documentary, reality television and "Candid Camera," with Vargas instigating the proceedings.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    The AIDS scare remains as much window dressing as do other period details such as rotary phones and cassette tapes. Test seems to be about dance above all, with choreographed montages filling the bulk of its running time.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    It's far more invested in elaborate historical reenactments, hypothetical dramatizations and special effects than interviews, research and data.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    Hector may indeed learn that narcissism stands in the way of happiness, but he also walks away with his privileges intact and unchallenged.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    Live at the Foxes Den comes off like some long-unproduced Broadway musical finally dusted off when someone raised enough money to mount it as a film production instead.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    Andrew Douglas, who directed the 2005 "The Amityville Horror" remake, mishandles the standard noir as straightforward drama and gives it an unfortunate after-school-special vibe.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    Familiar paternal regret gets ratcheted up here with an illogical and gratuitous investigative exercise.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    The film hardly scratches Abu Ghraib's surface.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    So instructional is the film, directed by Brook's son, Simon, that it feels like one of those P90X or Insanity home fitness programs: Try this at home. You too can perform on stage.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    A "Saw" knockoff without the torture porn.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    The slickly produced documentary Farmland often comes off like lobbyist propaganda, profusely extolling the virtues of the independent American farmer.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    At its best, the film seems as dreary a travelogue as that Nia Vardalos vehicle "My Life in Ruins." At its worst, Chaplin of the Mountains feels like an overambitious film-school thesis with superfluous political and philosophical posturing.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    The method to Von Trier's madness is that he provokes thought alongside outrage in his parables. Here, Gebbe musters only outrage, as her antagonists are without nuance, mercy or any redeeming quality.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    It's essentially a glorified PowerPoint presentation that juxtaposes archival footage — an echo chamber of interviews, readings and performances taken entirely out of context — with amateurish stock footage and a short running time.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    Although this film doesn't miss the whole point of found footage as the recent "Into the Storm" did, Jung does little to help suspend our disbelief.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    Whereas Haneke's films grapple with the blunt force of violence, novice filmmaker Markus Blunder just lets the violence snowball all the way down a slippery slope.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 20 Martin Tsai
    If you admire Kellan Lutz's chiseled body, The Legend of Hercules does offer plenty of that in 3-D glory.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 20 Martin Tsai
    War of the Worlds: Goliath is just a few cereal commercials shy of a pointlessly cartoon marathon — violent, messily drawn and lifelessly dragging.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 Martin Tsai
    If it only had a brain, a heart and the nerve.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 20 Martin Tsai
    Everything we can gather seems to nullify any virtues we saw in the original film.