For 106 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 37% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 54% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 12.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Martin Tsai's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 47
Highest review score: 90 Plot for Peace
Lowest review score: 10 Poseidon Rex
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 23 out of 106
  2. Negative: 33 out of 106
106 movie reviews
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Martin Tsai
    The will-he-or-won't-he question becomes the focus of director Mark Raso's film, and how William responds under the mercy of Effy's whims ultimately determines whether he can emerge from his self-absorption at long last.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    With verbal jabs and sight gags in equal measure, the script proves serviceably funny. As the film progresses, though, the hilarity does not escalate along with the outrageousness.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    The screenplay by Lane Shadgett and director Trevor White relies far too much on telling rather than showing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    Given the routineness of the chase itself, what jumps out here is the pervasive desperation shared by just about every character.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    While the cast and crew's competence well exceed what anyone would expect from this breed of B movies, they cannot compensate for the flawed internal logic in the screenplay.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    Like a typical Hollywood action-thriller, though, the screenplay jeopardizes the film. The twists concocted by writers James Robert Johnston and Bennett Yellin are mostly predictable; and the ones you don't see coming are outlandish.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    Some instances of impiousness work better than others.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    Despite this notable cast, the remake never manages to drum up much excitement for its sleepy hamlet rousing or for its characters, finally filled with purpose.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    The film is certainly interesting, despite the fact that it's a glorified promotional video for Muniz's installations.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    Miss Lovely does exude an air of authenticity... But much of the film remains underdeveloped.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    One Candle, Two Candles proves worthwhile at least as a cultural curio.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    This journey into "Martha Marcy May Marlene" territory is never as tense and gripping as it should be, the incidents and most of the performances too tamped-down to spark a much-needed sense of animating friction.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    By allowing Cameron's first-person account to take command of the narrative, though, the film seems to gloss over meaningful logistics of the expedition.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    This cautionary tale certainly has a chilling and timely message of how wars make monsters out of innocent people. But using reductive caricatures — complete with phlegmatic performances — to send that message is perhaps not the best way, because it turns something with modern-day implications into distant allegory.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    The film feels like a sketch rather than a portrait, beautifully rendered but incomplete in the details.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Martin Tsai
    Fredric Dannen's reportage, which appeared in a 1992 issue of the New Yorker and serves as the film's basis, contains lurid details that leap off the page in a cinematic way. The "Dragons" script by Michael Di Jiacomo and co-director Andrew Loo preserves many, but few register on-screen.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    The film's colorblindness does not make up for its latent sexism.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    If "The Bible" was CliffsNotes for the Scriptures, Son of God is the cheat sheet. The two-hour film condenses about four hours of what already was hasty television, and it all winds up a little dramatically static.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    Like many found-footage films before it, The Den never entirely suspends disbelief. It doesn't satisfyingly account for how the characters are producing all the footage.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    Not unlike most of its Hollywood counterparts, though, this Hong Kong import can't resist the urge to dumb down a fascinating premise for the sake of mass consumption.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    The film blurs lines between documentary, reality television and "Candid Camera," with Vargas instigating the proceedings.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    The AIDS scare remains as much window dressing as do other period details such as rotary phones and cassette tapes. Test seems to be about dance above all, with choreographed montages filling the bulk of its running time.
    • 15 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    It's far more invested in elaborate historical reenactments, hypothetical dramatizations and special effects than interviews, research and data.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    Hector may indeed learn that narcissism stands in the way of happiness, but he also walks away with his privileges intact and unchallenged.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    Although director and co-writer Cutter Hodierne tells the story from the pirates' viewpoint, he adds no more dimension to them than the one we saw in "Phillips."
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    Director Brett Harvey has gotten the documentary look and format down pat, complete with generic and gratuitous nature and cityscape shots. Where he shows an amateurish hand is in the term-paper-like voice-over narration and the inclusion of underqualified talking heads.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Martin Tsai
    Director Sanjay Rawal also allows the likes of Eva Longoria (an executive producer of the film, as is "Fast Food Nation" author Eric Schlosser) and members of the Kennedy dynasty to hijack the farmworkers' story. It's a reductive strategy that ultimately insults viewers' intelligence.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    Live at the Foxes Den comes off like some long-unproduced Broadway musical finally dusted off when someone raised enough money to mount it as a film production instead.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    Andrew Douglas, who directed the 2005 "The Amityville Horror" remake, mishandles the standard noir as straightforward drama and gives it an unfortunate after-school-special vibe.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Martin Tsai
    Familiar paternal regret gets ratcheted up here with an illogical and gratuitous investigative exercise.

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