For 226 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Mary Pols' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 Inside Out
Lowest review score: 0 Jack and Jill
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 20 out of 226
226 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Mary Pols
    Weitz knows his muse. But he’s smartly made room for Tomlin to explore her own wisdom, to look into a mirror (literal and figurative) of an older woman’s past and present with remorse, tears and, best of all, delighted laughter at discovering something new in herself. At 75, Tomlin remains the coolest.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Mary Pols
    Southpaw is a foreshadowing machine, but it works, movingly, because Fuqua (Training Day) tempers the melodrama inherent in screenwriter Kurt Sutter’s (Sons of Anarchy) script with a muted tone and clear confidence in his cast.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Mary Pols
    Inside Out is nearly hallucinogenic, entirely beautiful and easily the animation studio’s best release since 2010’s "Toy Story 3." Stylistically Inside Out is nothing like Richard Linklater’s "Boyhood," but for its scope in examining the maturation process, it might well be called "Childhood."
    • 48 Metascore
    • 30 Mary Pols
    The Counsellor is neither an outright disaster nor misunderstood masterpiece: it’s just a very bad idea for a film, proficiently executed.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Mary Pols
    A wry and moving look at a time in life that tends to get short shrift in U.S. cinema.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Mary Pols
    Kutcher, whose acting chops haven’t been tested in all those pretty-boy lead roles, was a welcome surprise. His movie-star glow distracts, but there is a strong physical resemblance. Moreover, he’s got many of Jobs’ mannerisms down cold, from that T Rex–like walk to the fingers that fan the air and the yoga-style postures left over from his bohemian youth. It’s a good impression, but Jobs itself is all too impressionistic.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Mary Pols
    They’re cute together, these two big stars, but the film around them, a sort of Tarantino lite, is desperately empty.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Mary Pols
    It is derivative and too deliberately zany, but still a heartfelt charmer.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Mary Pols
    Despicable Me 2 is far more entertaining than the disappointingly bland "Monsters University" and as a sequel stands level with the first film, and may have the edge on it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Mary Pols
    What makes White House Down not just tolerable but frivolously entertaining is its slapstick soul; a scene where the presidential limousine does doughnuts on the South Lawn plays like an homage to the Keystone Kops.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Mary Pols
    It is intensely raunchy and silly and joyous and tapped right into my inner teenager in a glorious way.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Mary Pols
    Some moviegoers may opt for an easier cinematic pleasure than this carefully crafted, discomforting look at familial misery in hyper drive, but it is the most provocative movie about parenting I’ve seen since "The Kids Are All Right."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Mary Pols
    The slight but captivating indie-comedy The Kings of Summer has the ragtag look and feel of a movie made in some teenager’s basement
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Mary Pols
    Bravely and with penetrating intelligence, Before Midnight elevates instead the practical, a partnership: frayed by disappointment, worn by time, but for the very luckiest—which we sincerely and selfishly hope includes Jesse and Celine—durable for the long day’s journey into night.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Mary Pols
    The Hangover Part III gives off such a stench of creative decay that it hardly seems possible that even Phillips or his co-writers have any use for the movie themselves. If a movie can be self-loathing and self-destructive, it’s this one.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Mary Pols
    Mud
    Glorious vision of youth and truth, love and loss, your name is Mud.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Mary Pols
    42
    Boseman is not a hugely close physical match to Robinson, except for perhaps in the power he conveys, but he’s a great choice to play the ball player, unfamiliar enough, despite a decade of small credits here and there, to feel like an athlete, not a movie star playing one.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Mary Pols
    The Place Beyond the Pines can’t be said to be anyone’s movie but Cianfrance’s. Structured as a triptych, the movie is novelistic, earnest and somewhat exhausting — an ambitious effort that tries to be many things. And it is definitely something: a sprawling, engaging study in fathers, sons and sins.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Mary Pols
    Maybe they’re all right. Or wrong. It can’t be settled. What matters is that people are still crazy about the beauty of a beautiful movie about going crazy.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Mary Pols
    While Admission remains the story of a woman who comes to question her past choices and jeopardize her career, the movie version is lighter, fluffier and dramatically inert.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Mary Pols
    Ginger & Rosa never matches the freshness of its young star.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Mary Pols
    Beyond the Hills may be the best movie no one will want to see in 2013.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Mary Pols
    The movie is called A Place at the Table and it specifically addresses our country’s hunger crisis. But it also speaks to larger hungers. Hungers for independence, a dignified life, a better chance for ones children — in short, the American dream. See it and weep.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Mary Pols
    The technology is undeniably there to make a credible beanstalk fly into the heavens, and giants that are utterly grotesque and vividly threatening. But how about something we can take our kids too? Doesn’t anyone want them to be there?
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Mary Pols
    Snitch wasn’t going to be good no matter what Johnson did; it is so poorly directed that even Academy Award winner Susan Sarandon, playing a shrewish federal prosecutor, comes off as a hack straight off a soap opera.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Mary Pols
    The man (Sparks) is a cultural magpie, capable of borrowing from a 1991 Julia Roberts flick and M. Night Shyamalan in one fell swoop. He’ll never get an award for originality, but when it comes to rehashing formula and pleasing his audience, the man is a master.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Mary Pols
    Beautiful Creatures is good fun and I want to know what happens next for Lena the teenaged witch.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Mary Pols
    It’s just a movie, with a dramatic arc that’s supposed to make all that mean stuff drift away into the ether as friendship is born, but it’s that look that hangs around like a bad smell.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Mary Pols
    All this eye candy is ultimately only about as engaging as watching kids at play, which is what Sheen and Schwartzman seem to be doing. I can’t argue that this isn’t an accurate glimpse inside some man’s mind — perhaps Austin Powers?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Mary Pols
    Warm Bodies is the first movie worth paying to see in theaters this year. It’s an inventive charmer that visits all the typical movie scenarios of young love amid chaos and disaster, but with a new dimension: one of the romantic leads is a zombie.

Top Trailers