For 58 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 5% same as the average critic
  • 63% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.8 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matt Singer's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 90 Mad Max: Fury Road
Lowest review score: 10 Mother's Day
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 21 out of 58
  2. Negative: 8 out of 58
58 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Singer
    As in all of Wright’s films, the surface is just as satisfying as the subtext: hilarious comedy, compelling character drama, eye-popping visuals, and a juicy science-fiction story.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Singer
    Those willing to put in the time will find a movie that is both beautiful and hideous, funny and shocking, and even thoughtful on occasion.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Singer
    Even though this is the fourth Mad Max, and it’s indebted to the style of the previous films, Fury Road stands alone. It’s better looking and more thrilling than any of the other installments. The color palette is vibrant and beautiful, and every inch of the frame is crammed with crazy, brilliant ideas.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Matt Singer
    The brilliance is all in the execution, which is just about perfect, from the score of hard-rocking music (and ear-piercing feedback) to the gritty cinematography by Sean Porter.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Singer
    The film pinballs from one setpiece to the next with almost no concern for plot, characters, pacing, or stakes. At times, laughing at all the jokes actually gets a little exhausting.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Matt Singer
    Shadow makes an urgent, compelling case for the importance of bright, clear, fluid battles. This movie has everything modern blockbuster spectacles lack: precision, grace, intimacy, stakes, and genuine, gritty excitement.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Singer
    Beneath the (sometimes hysterically funny) gags, is a surprisingly thoughtful examination of the same issues that bubble through Joel and Ethan Coen’s more serious pictures; the folly of man, the nature of faith, and the terror of trying to figure out what path through life is the correct one to take.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Singer
    The film’s structure — off-putting in the early going, irresistible by the end — is ingenious.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Singer
    Black’s general atmosphere of resigned melancholy fits perfectly with The Nice Guys and its portrait of sleazy 1970s Los Angeles, the ideal setting for a filmmaker interested in faded dreams and broken dreamers.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Singer
    Tickled is a fantastic film to watch and discuss but it’s almost impossible to write about it, because most of its pleasures come from following Farrier as he tries to find the powerful figure atop the Competitive Endurance Tickling league.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Matt Singer
    This movie isn’t just fun; it’s sincere and sweet and downright inspiring.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Singer
    Though the plot is predictable, individual scenes (and individual targets) are anything but. In the film’s best moments, it’s more than funny; it’s exciting, and almost as daring as its indomitable lead actor.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Singer
    At its best, Days Of Future Past feels not just like an X-Men comic book, but like an X-Men comic-book crossover... Like Days Of Future Past, crossovers in comics tend to be light on character development. But when they’re good, the huge stakes and epic scale of the action make them hard to put down.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Singer
    Neeson’s latest effort, A Walk Among The Tombstones, is slightly more subdued than his average shoot-’em-up, but no less gruffly satisfying.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Singer
    Even if it falls a little short as a character study, the fact that it’s both hugely weird and hugely watchable is impressive.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Singer
    Although Star Wars has always been about the past, The Force Awakens is ironically at its best when it looks the future.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Singer
    If The Finest Hours is light on surprises it’s still heavy on suspense, as the script by Scott Silver, Paul Tamasy, and Eric Johnson treats each new obstacle in Bernie and Ray’s paths as a new brainteasing puzzle with an impossible solution.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Singer
    Popstar feels a bit like elite military snipers shooting fish in a barrel. Their aim is true, but the targets are almost too easy — not to mention awfully familiar.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Singer
    Dory is an entertaining and heartfelt sequel, but it never quite shakes the feeling that Pixar, a studio known for breaking new ground in animation, is retracing its steps this time out.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Singer
    Even in its slightly rambling, Spielberg-less form, Raiders! moved me in ways I did not anticipate. Zala and Strompolos’ Raiders: The Adaptation remains an incredible piece of fan appreciation, and a true work of art in its own right.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Matt Singer
    Surrounded by so many bloated, unsatisfying movies, The Shallows is as refreshing as a quick dip on a hot summer day — preferably in a pool, not the ocean. They tend to be safer and less shark-infested.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Singer
    Even though the film’s overall impact is blunted by Wheatley’s frequently inscrutable plotting (co-written with Amy Jump), Rose’s images...speak louder than words.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Singer
    Sabotage’s mystery component is mostly dead on arrival, and poor Olivia Williams has the thankless job of carrying it as the no-nonsense detective searching for the killer. But as Ayer proved with his previous film, End Of Watch, he has a natural eye and ear for the ecosystem of law enforcement.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Singer
    The biggest problem with Draft Day is that even as it shows Sonny sticking to his guns, its absurd, saccharine third act suggests Reitman didn’t stick to his, and allowed his latest celebration of free-spirited mavericks to get co-opted by the very kind of system they were created to criticize.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Singer
    Lucy earns points for its unpredictable treatment of its vaguely superhero-ish premise and an appealing silliness, but it struggles to match wits with the genius at its center.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Singer
    Kill The Messenger isn’t a great movie, but it’s a great vehicle for Renner, and a showcase for the kind of work he should be doing more regularly.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Singer
    How to Be Single isn’t particularly hilarious, but it’s not particularly unpleasant either. The characters are likable. Their lives are fun to wander through for 100 minutes. Their small, daily battles are relatable, even to a 35-year-old dude.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Singer
    The results are mostly pleasing and occasionally very funny (particularly whenever Manganiello pops up and Pee-wee tries to pronounce his name). But they also feel very familiar, something that flies in the face of the movie’s key theme about reinvention.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Singer
    Favreau’s Jungle Book is at its best in moments of visual splendor; when his camera pulls back to admire the sweep of the CGI foliage or yet another dazzling computer creation wanders into frame. Those images have a clarity that the rest of the movie often lacks.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Matt Singer
    This is a much better comedy than it is an action movie.

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