Matthew Gilbert

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For 937 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 44% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Matthew Gilbert's Scores

Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Louie: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Tuesday Night Book Club: Season 1
Score distribution:
937 tv reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    These two extraordinary talents have done an average job with what is a surprisingly unimaginative premise.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    The characters are one-dimensional, so that you essentially know who they are within a minute or less, not least of all the spoiled-belle Confederate volunteer Emma Green (Hannah James), who’s straight outta “Gone With the Wind.” And the story lines about patients are didactic, there simply to provide the writers with EZ-to-read lessons about race, war, and medical progress.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Matthew Gilbert
    The show is neither here nor there, neither amusing nor affecting. It doesn't really call out for further viewing, which is not so unusual at all.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s too broad and familiar to hold attention.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Matthew Gilbert
    Dreyfuss impressively keeps Madoff’s villainy human-scaled and, at times, petty, and therefore more potent. The miniseries that is constructed around him, though, is flat and simplistic, with none of the intelligence and intrigue that has elevated other stories set in high finance, “Billions” and “The Big Short.”
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    The humor is madcap and inane where it should be wry, and the characters are stubbornly predictable. The editing of the show is swift and bouncy, as it is on "Burn Notice,'' but still the hour drags. It's just not much fun.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Matthew Gilbert
    Parenthood is a fairly promising ensemble dramedy that shows TV expanding beyond an emphasis on nuclear families to look at broader family systems reaching from ages 5 to 75.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Matthew Gilbert
    It's too bland to elicit very strong feelings either for or against. It's a legal drama with the same kind of buddy dynamic as "Psych" and "White Collar," and by the end of the hour--or, just for tonight, the hour and 20 minutes--I felt like shrugging my shoulders.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Matthew Gilbert
    The pluses of the show include watching Leary have a good time and seeing the way the cast gels around him.... Other TV series set in the music business--“Nashville,” “Empire”--have a lot more genre awareness and seem to make the characters’ enthusiasm believable enough. But on Sex&Drugs, even the costumes appear generic and unrealized.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Matthew Gilbert
    If Mad Love pushes toward a more distinctive identity and grows beyond TV's standard two-couple romantic situations, there may be hope.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Matthew Gilbert
    When The Lottery conjectures about the scary cultural tilt that a lack of fertility could cause around the world, it’s at its best.... Unfortunately, the makers of “The Lottery,” led by writer-producer Timothy J. Sexton, who was one of the five screenwriters on the similarly themed 2006 movie “Children of Men,” are more concerned with a far more formulaic suspense story line.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    There is no sense of who Cheney is, beyond his restatements.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    Everything aside from Pacino in this movie is surprisingly ordinary and lacking.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Matthew Gilbert
    "Shark" is a very conventional courtroom TV drama about a do-good lawyer, and its only distinction is the ferocious acting of Woods.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Matthew Gilbert
    It’s hard to fault a drama that celebrates altruism and tries to glamorize social conscience. But I found myself cringing at the condescending scenes of our rich white savior wandering among the Africans with their colorful outfits and drum music, his checkbook at the ready in case he needs to bribe a local.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    "Day Break" doesn't quite work, not only because of its redundancies but because its story line becomes simultaneously convoluted and pointless.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    The movie looks great, like a very extended perfume commercial. But it has no substance.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    It comes off as a straining, overly serious wannabe.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    The look of the new X-Files may be familiar, but as a whole, it feels rote and unintentionally dreary.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Matthew Gilbert
    Known for asking tough questions and being the cranky "America's Got Talent" judge, Morgan was indeed surprising--surprisingly soft. He failed to press Oprah hard on any of her more touchy-feely answers. And yet his Barbara Walters-esque method worked, to some extent, since Oprah is not one to bend to pressure.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Matthew Gilbert
    USA's Fairly Legal is fairly good. OK, I hate myself for that. But the phrase "fairly good" just seems so right in this case.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Matthew Gilbert
    A slick effects extravaganza whose pilot episode kept me looking instead of enjoying.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Matthew Gilbert
    [Piven] brings a contemporary delivery that is jarring in the context of all the period elements around him. Alas, in this particular entourage, which is filled with promise, Piven is the weak link.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    The show could have been a fascinating dissection of self and Bean’s performance could have been tied to something expansive. But Legends is knee-deep at best, relying on feeble plots of the week and high-tech wizardry that borders on the unintentionally comic. The supporting cast is as shallow as Bean is deep.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    "The Class" will never be smart, or clever, or original, but it does have a chance of becoming inoffensive and diverting.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Matthew Gilbert
    It would be great to see the network come up with something as honest as, say, “My So-Called Life,” or as original and amusingly metaphorical as “Buffy the Vampire Slayer,” or as thought-provoking as a movie like “River’s Edge.” But in the meantime, a mostly happy dramedy like Chasing Life will do, marrying strong female roles with CW-style 20-something melodrama that’s as mindlessly angsty as the Bon Iver on the soundtrack.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Matthew Gilbert
    It feels more like a programming move than a creative endeavor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Matthew Gilbert
    Watching a comedy about a has-been trying to gain relevance shouldn’t feel quite this dated.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Matthew Gilbert
    It's a bit of a mess. I found myself wishing that the series, which tracks a loosely knit group of nine friends in the Washington Heights area of New York, actually had more direction.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Matthew Gilbert
    The product tie-in is tiresome, but Wolk in particular, with his winks and grins, adds warmth as Williams’s cocky protege. He also rescues a few scenes in which Williams starts to drift into the nonsense stratosphere.

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