Melissa Anderson
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For 275 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 69% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Melissa Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Leviathan
Lowest review score: 0 Another Happy Day
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 92 out of 275
  2. Negative: 42 out of 275
275 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    You Don't Like the Truth focuses on the pathetic manipulations of Canadian intelligence officers as they interrogate Toronto-born Omar Khadr, the youngest prisoner held in Guantánamo Bay.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Pina gives us the supreme pleasure of watching fascinating bodies of widely varying ages in motion, whether leaping, falling, catching, diving, grieving, or exulting. Wenders's expert use of 3-D puts viewers up close to the spaces, both psychic and physical, inside and out, of Bausch's work.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Tomboy astutely explores the freedom, however brief, of being untethered to the highly rule-bound world of gender codes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Filmed during the months leading up to the 2009 presidential election in Iran, The Hunter still seethes with fury - and anticipates the blood that would spill after the vote.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Dalle, with a mouth that could devour the world, unravels inexorably but with decadent dignity, and Chiha's singular film never relies on cliché in its examination of illness, disappointment, and abandonment.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Every shot and edit in Wiseman's film also suggests without over-explaining, allowing a viewer to lose herself in pleasure.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    If Side Effects, an immensely pleasurable thriller centering around psychotropic drugs, really is Steven Soderbergh's final big-screen film, as the director claims it will be, then he has peaked in the Valley of the Dolls.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Matching the precision of the film's title, remembrances of things past-whether destructive or salutary, quickly mentioned or dilated upon-are shaped by just enough exacting detail.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Hawkes and Hunt nobly tackle the physical demands their roles require.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    El Velador still sharply conveys what life is like in a traumatized nation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    A funky, nonfiction tribute to the great avant-garde saxophonist Ornette Coleman, Ornette upends the staid portrait-of-the-artist formula, and it tinkers with and discards the conventions of the bio documentary just as its pioneering musician subject exploded those of jazz.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    Watching this taciturn man grow close to mother and child - close enough that he experiences twinges of jealousy and abandonment toward the end of Las Acacias - is one of the most satisfying spectacles in a movie this year, a time-lapse of emotions rendered perfectly.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    For many of the film's brisk 84 minutes, Fox eclipses his earlier work-and several other same-sex tragedies-by immersing us in his protagonist's quiet turmoil.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Melissa Anderson
    A fiction film that documents the unpredictable, unscripted actions of its pint-size lead, Nana offers new ways of thinking about childhood, or, at the very least, about children in movies.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Whether or not James Longley's boldly stylized reportage breaches public indifference, its enduring value is assured: When the war is long gone, this deft construction will persist in relevance, if not for what it says about the mess we once made, then as a model of canny cinematic construction.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    There's great archival footage.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Wintour's arctic imperiousness has a way of creating the most masochistic deference, a dynamic that R.J Cutler superficially explores--and becomes prone to--in his documentary The September Issue.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Likably stoopid, the latest from comedy troupe Broken Lizard (Super Troopers, Beerfest) mines plenty of jokes from eating out and being served.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    It helps that Wein's subject is such a fascinating, garrulous paradox.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    For a movement that was "fundamentally leaderless," Braderman's film gives its participants an opportunity to rightfully claim: "We thought we could change things--and, in fact, we did."
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    An affectionate portrait of a lower-middle-class, outer-borough clan, City Island works best as an actor's showcase, with Margulies's aggrieved, simmering wife the stand-out.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    The film courageously shows its reprobate hero sliding further, not redeeming himself.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Her (Davis) homage--tender, never hagiographic--also contains some biting analysis of the racism, both overt and insidious, that the artist was up against.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Going below the surface, the filmmakers and the cast (including a marvelous performance by Marian Seldes as an osteoporotic doyenne) successfully create the hardest characters to pull off: exotic yet recognizable New Yorkers.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Down Terrace has frequently been appreciated as "The Sopranos meets Mike Leigh." But a more fruitful comparison might be to last year's stand-out British satire "In the Loop": In both films, verbal aggression makes for the biggest laughs and the surest signs of moral decay.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Writer-director Tanya Hamilton's striking debut is the rare recent American-independent film that goes beyond the private dramas of its protagonists, imagining them as players in broader historical moments.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Bitton, best known for her 2004 nonfiction film "Wall," about the barrier Israel is building along its border with the occupied territories of the West Bank, questions her interviewees calmly and dispassionately (though her voice is heard, she is never seen). It's a strategy that yields damning revelations.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Spitzer, whose tireless efforts to redeem himself led to his cooperation in this doc, receives an entirely sympathetic-yet thoroughly researched-treatment from Gibney.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Though hewing to a too-conventional structure, Bowser's film is densely researched enough to yield insights not just into its overlooked subject, but also into his overly analyzed era.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Melissa Anderson
    Like the pacing of the novel, the film, even at almost two and a half hours, moves briskly, continuously drawing us in.