Melissa Anderson
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For 274 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 27% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 69% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Melissa Anderson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Poetry
Lowest review score: 0 Ghosts of Girlfriends Past
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 91 out of 274
  2. Negative: 42 out of 274
274 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    In this densely populated ensemble piece, Reeves stands out as the only actor whose damaged character evokes sympathy and avoids cliché. Pippa, played by Wright Penn in near-permanent Stepford Wife mode, isn't much more than a vehicle for false epiphanies and forced rapprochements.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Serious Moonlight has a backstory much more intriguingly dramatic than what's onscreen.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Awkwardly mixes blue material with sob stories.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    An earnest, if inert, civil rights docudrama clearly shot on the cheap (many of the wigs appear to have been borrowed from the Black Dynamite set).
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    As subtle as a face-punch, La Mission nobly continues a necessary conversation about homophobia, but paves the way to hell with its own good intentions.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    This Down Under noir confuses incoherent body pileups with "twists."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Beyond fans of Mélanie Laurent--who furiously fingers a fiddle and wears flashback wigs--The Concert may appeal to those who delight in stereotypes.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Though Crawford's bangs and facial hair are the most art-directed aspect of the movie, he's costumed to look like a member of the Trenchcoat Mafia (Madison Avenue branch).
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    In any language, the actress (Kristin Scott Thomas) does what she can to best serve her scripts, even when they're hopelessly beneath her.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Just as Friends With Kids compares unfavorably to Westfeldt's earlier effort, her cast members' previous projects further highlight this film's shortcomings.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    The film is endurable owing solely to Johnson, a veteran of bad kids' movies whose sense of when to dial up the charm in such a generic, soulless entertainment remains impeccable.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    While rooting for the marine mammals (and wishing for more footage of them - and even of their animatronic incarnations), your heart will also go out to the cast, stuck even more pitiably in syrupy manufactured crises.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Speaking of camp, the diva battle teased in the trailer for Joyful Noise between its two stars, Queen Latifah and Dolly Parton, flatlines, as do most of the movie's jokes.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Blunt, loud, and showboaty, Illegal suffers even more when compared with another recent Liège-set film about the horrors faced by paperless immigrants: the Dardennes' "Lorna's Silence."
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Ted
    It's dispiriting enough to witness Kunis still waiting for a comic lead role worthy of her. But the usually nimble Wahlberg - who at least has one great moment rattling off "white-trash girls' names" - suffers the most, playing second fiddle to a knee-high Gund knockoff.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    That so many of the colossal yokel's mental states are literalized, as when the screen fills with thousands of rats while Margueritte reads Camus's "The Plague" aloud to her new pal, typifies the movie's antipathy to nuance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Life, Above All suggests that ignorance and stigmatization are a problem only in the village, not in the highest office of government.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Crafted not to give the slightest offense, The Art of Getting By makes the great - and even the mediocre - teen movies of 30 years ago, like "Fast Times at Ridgemont High," "Fame," and "Foxes," look even more radical in comparison, with their depiction of obnoxious, horny, property-destroying teens.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Denied the opportunity to see Candy at her best, simultaneously mocking and paying homage to golden-age glamour, viewers instead get too much of Jeremiah Newton, a close friend of the actress's and guardian of her papers, personal effects, and ashes (and one of Beautiful Darling's producers).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Dutifully follows the template of scores of movies about the Shoah: wringing from atrocity the most unseemly sentimentality.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    For a film that's supposed to be rooted in such a specific time and place, Sylvia isn't really concerned with details: Costumes, hair, and décor appear to be the work of "That '70s Show" interns; William H. Macy, as Danielle's Mormon soon-to-be stepdad, continuously muffs a Sooner State drawl.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Nivola and Breslin sing and perform the original numbers, welcome interludes that provide respite from Rosenthal's lousy script.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    There is exactly one unexpected moment in the otherwise drearily predictable The Five-Year Engagement that, though little more than a throwaway line, at least adds a bit of political reality to puncture Nicholas Stoller's limp, hermetic comedy of deferred nuptials.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    3
    More willing suspension of disbelief - or suppression of giggles - is required.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Enduring a day-long session of couples' therapy is more fun (and flies by faster) than this film.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    The pathetic attempts at outré, taboo-busting humor as sociopolitical commentary can't disguise what this film really is: a mawkish, MOR comedy of manners that even its straw man Nicolas Sarkozy would find suitable for date night.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Appears to have been made on a budget equivalent to the cost of a WNBA fleece hoodie. But even at that price, the first feature by Tim Chambers is profligate with sports-movie clichés.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Impersonally directed by cinéma du look pioneer Luc Besson, The Lady was written by first-timer Rebecca Frayn, whose script has all the elegance and nuance of Google Translate.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    All the words that follow assault the ear in this unnecessary rehashing of the earthy virtues of low-paid laborers versus the stiffness of the bourgeoisie.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 40 Melissa Anderson
    Boy
    The abundant charm of first-time actor James Rolleston, playing the 11-year-old of the title in Boy, doesn't quite save the aimless, nostalgia-woozy second feature from Taika Waititi (2007's Eagle vs. Shark).