Michael Atkinson
Select another critic »
For 856 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 29% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael Atkinson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb
Lowest review score: 0 Strippers
Score distribution:
856 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    As obvious in many ways as its title (and its poster), Mean Creek retains a gritty working-class ambience, but it feels over-rehearsed.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    The film slowly sheds its convincing identity as nonfiction and becomes a cruel parody of making-of docs, studio-movie pandering, and showbiz egomania.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    Authentic ethical dialogue is conspicuous for its absence, as is the potentially disturbing view of a normal, working-class corner of American society going not-so-quietly cuckoo.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    Ray
    Hackford's movie falls into a meandering saunter. As the music grows dull, so does the movie.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    The Aviator could've been a "Raging Bull" brother film, given that masterpiece's crystalline purity of purpose and humiliated courage. But it brakes far short.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    Dolls risks the bank on symbology as gaudy as teen anime and as heavy as a stone temple.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    In its details, though, Juan José Campanella's movie works beautifully: The actors are all superb when the florid demands of the story allow them elbowroom.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    For all of its careful realism, Lan Yu is constructed around clichés, plummeting toward a modestly heroic sacrifice and a tearjerking act of fate. But Kwan is a master of shadow, quietude, and room noise, and Lan Yu is a disarmingly lived-in movie.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    Visconti's film remains a Euro-culture touchstone, though not nearly as convincing or visually stunning as its reputation insists.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    A pre-programmed mediocrity, a slave to its clichés.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    It's a sprightly, low-fiber comedy while the comedy lasts.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    A modest, formulaic day trip from Kazakhstan.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    What rescues Major Dundee in the end from its many conflicts and unresolved passions is Heston.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    Brothers emerges as no less or more than Bier's claustrophobic compositions and unimaginative choices.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    What's abundantly clear is how far this kind of moviemaking has come from any knowledge of real criminal life; it's a geek's ineffectual daydream of mayhem.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    The film will come to share the video store shelf with Harlin's infinitely stupider rendition soon enough, but it's a shame they couldn't have been released theatrically head-to-head -- a death match-cum-clinical trial that might've supplied some objective stats on how much condescension the American moviegoer actually enjoys.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    Plays best as a dry exercise in historical doublespeak and rationalization.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    The Central Park Zoo is cheaper, you can walk away from the penguins after 10 minutes, and it has snow monkeys and beer.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    As it is, Duris, capable and dull, is no Keitel, 2005 is no 1978, and The Beat That My Heart Skipped is no "Fingers."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    Hardly the kids'-sports movie we need, but maybe it's as much as we can handle.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    Winterbottom never provides the empathic connective tissue we expect. Love it or not, 9 Songs amounts to a common human rite fastidiously caught in amber, giving off no heat or joy but crystallized for the future.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    The comedy is somewhat doused by posture and repetition, and the characters' whimsical behavior is endearing and irritating in turn. Which still makes it the absolute best neo-samurai judo farce in town.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    What results is unremarkably schizophrenic--half gritty sojourn into the inner-city furnace, half Hollywood brain death.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    Foer's ironic ideas have a lovely roundness to them, and somehow the film achieves Holocaust-fiction balance without much ado or melodrama. It may be substantially less ambitious than its source material, but that may be what saves it from implosion.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    It's all fascinating, but must Kalatozov's careening angel of cinema be laid bare?
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    If this silly retread works at all, it's because of Coogan, who comes at the creaky premise with almost Streepian commitment and who is destined, it would seem, for better things.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    May be the ultimate paradigm of self-reflexive cinema, eating Godard's tail for him and one-upping the classic anti-cartoon Duck Amuck by submitting to a cunning entropy and a self-inquiry so relentless the movie never moves from square one.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    Taylor traipses around after Zizek on a continent-hopping lecture tour, and we get a face full of the man's tireless analysis, in a style that can only be characterized as hyperactive grizzly bear, complete with spit-spewing speech impediment.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    The Libertine's trouble lies precisely in its efforts at conjuring the historical past: No one in the film seems much more convinced than I am that because playwrights and authors wrote in clever, high post-Elizabethan diction, then everyone spoke that way every day, in the pubs, with whores.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Michael Atkinson
    A modest and mildly pretentious mediocrity in the Woodman canon.

Top Trailers