Michael O'Sullivan

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For 1,261 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 Song of the Sea
Lowest review score: 0 Tomcats
Score distribution:
1261 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Toward the end, the film veers a bit out of control, as the residents engage in behavior that is incomprehensible, even given their previous transgressions.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    A hyper-violent, post-apocalyptic Western in the mold of "Mad Max" that can't make up its mind whether it wants to be corny or misanthropic.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    I, too, once enjoyed the Minions, in the small doses that they came in. But the extra-strength Minions is, for better or for worse, too much of a good thing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    A lovingly laid-back documentary about the charms, liquid and otherwise, of the traditional Irish watering hole.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s slightly fussy, in-your-face filmmaking, but it’s viscerally effective.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Watching it leaves you feeling less buzzed than jittery and slightly nauseated. If the "Ocean's" movies were martinis, Contraband is a thermos full of coffee.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Fortunately, the monsters are actually kind of a kick. And isn’t that why you go to see a movie like this anyway?
    • 37 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Gimme Shelter has a lighter touch than you might think. Yet there are times when its attempts at wringing drama out of real life are more strenuous than is strictly necessary.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Collet-Serra, who directed Neeson in “Unknown,” has a knack for keeping things lively and moving forward. There are moments of humor, gripping action and real terror.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Compared to the “Fast and Furious” films, Hours is a chamber piece, but Walker wrings real pathos out of his instrument.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The absence of legal details makes the movie something of a cheat. It offers few insights about the case from the official side, let alone about the machinations of Ai’s legal team.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Double retains all of Dostoevsky’s central themes. Madness, alienation and the loss of identity swirl around the film’s edges like film-noir fog. At the same time, the filmmakers inject a much-needed dose of dark humor into the tale.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Everest gets several things right, but it fails to find a way to make the average viewer relate to the people on the mountain.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    If it weren't so shocking, it would be a lot funnier.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's cute. So is the movie. If it never rises to greatness, it may be because it's also a fairly formulaic romcom.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Big, slick and showy. It is also undeniably effective entertainment.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a thoughtful and workmanlike portrait, but a less than profoundly moving one.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the film’s heavy-handed effort at vindication, Renner manages to deliver a performance that is complex and satisfyingly contradictory.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Depending on how you take your twee — sparingly or, as is the case in this preciously concocted tale of English misfits, slathered like marmalade over a crumpet — it will either delight or quickly cloy.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is, at times, almost sinfully fun, assuming you have a taste for self-indulgently logic-free hedonism.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    When the climax does come, it arrives with a bra­cing blast of campy absurdity so flamboyantly deviant that it glows with a kind of perverse brilliance. But the setup is starved of logic, the film’s vital oxygen.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Conjuring 2 satisfies more than it disappoints.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    After a somewhat tedious and overly episodic first half...Trumbo becomes a far more successful movie.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Most of the pleasure of Mockingjay — Part 2 comes from watching Lawrence, not the story around her. Her aim is true, even if the narrative arc of the movie traces a long, wobbly path toward its eventual, and not exactly happy, resting place.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite broad satire about racism and border fences that will appeal to some liberals, the movie doesn't line up neatly along party lines -- except in that other sense of the word "party." It's a movie that just wants to have fun.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    There’s little of the poetry that Perry teaches in the script, but the story’s mechanics are solid.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Moretti mostly avoids weepy melodrama, choosing instead to focus on a side meditation about the slippery nature of reality.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's filthy, funny and kind of sweet, if not quite up to the level of Judd Apatow's oeuvre in the burgeoning field of R-rated comedies with heart. You will laugh and blush in equal measure.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s silly and a bit sappy, but it works, in a crowd-pleasing way.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The humor is even more wildly inappropriate, with a running joke about getting a baby stoned on pot, coke and ecstasy, and a scene inspired by the famous incident in "A Christmas Story" where the kid gets his tongue stuck to a frozen flagpole.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Genisys goes back to what made the franchise work in the first place: not the machine inside the man, but vice versa.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's depressing enough to watch this family's struggles with life. But their pain really hits home when you think that the pants you might be wearing could have contributed to it.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's the flaws that Kurtzman builds into People Like Us that make it interesting.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    To refuse to call A Hijacking a thriller is not to say it isn’t thrilling, in a dryly cerebral way. Writer-director Tobias Lindholm has a point to make, and he makes it pungently.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Both terribly silly and a lot of fun.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    There is, however, a certain urgency to the action that will prevent most people from noticing the film’s flaws.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although Gameau’s film includes a fair amount of science, he and his helpers sweeten the film’s statistics, delivering them in clever, accessible ways.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    As the espionage plot surges toward its nail-biting conclusion, the path it’s traveling feels less open-ended than preordained.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    As an action film, it is intense and gripping. As a drama, it is bombastic and unsubtle.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It will make you jump, to be sure, and your heart to beat a little bit faster. But what's truly scariest about it takes place not in the body, but in the mind.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end, its somewhat equivocal message — that nuclear power might just be the lesser of several evils — is more convincing than you’d think.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Pay 2 Play makes no new revelations... The difference with this movie is that it actually means to inspire hope.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Youth is intoxicating, I’ll admit. Had I never tasted this wine before, I could easily see myself yearning for another glass. But this time it feels like an old vintage in a new bottle, one that’s grown slightly stale rather than better with age.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Look of Love also is filled with acres and acres of naked flesh, but it’s the storytelling that keeps you engaged.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Elemental speaks to the importance of protecting the natural elements: water, air, earth. It’s a beautifully filmed piece, even when it’s showing us white clouds of pollutants billowing out of a smokestack.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    Wetlands has only a sketchy plot, based largely on Helen’s dreams, fantasies and childhood memories. It isn’t terribly clear where the movie — or its hedonistic heroine — is going, but getting there is one wild ride.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    In some ways it plays like a horror movie, in other ways it’s almost a documentary. The most interesting thing about the movie is the balance of tone that Laurent strikes between recognition and repulsion.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    For the most part, The Other Guys is seriously silly stuff, in the best sense.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The real problem with A Million Ways to Die in the West is one of editing. There are a million jokes in it, but only 500,000 of them are funny.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's powerful stuff, but I almost felt like I needed an intermission.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    At times, “Apocalypse” can be great fun, even if it doesn’t know when to hand its car keys to a friend and ask to be taken home.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The cast of mostly unfamiliar actors also serves The Visit well. Shyamalan has a gift for eliciting strong performances, even when his material is lacking.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    It is Markus's sensitivity to nuance and to the feelings of others that characterizes every step that he - and this sure-footed if off-kilter film - takes.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    "Out of the Shadows” isn’t going to win any awards, good or bad. Neither an embarrassment nor a triumph, it is nevertheless an improvement over the last film.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film ends with an ambiguous, yet powerful conclusion. It doesn’t answer the question it raises, yet the way it’s asked keeps it echoing in your head. Except that Cahill can’t seem to leave well enough alone.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    While not exactly a cop-out, Virgin may leave some viewers who crave traditional closure with the same hollow ache described by the narrator as follows: "What lingered after them was not life but the most trivial list of mundane facts."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    One half of a very funny movie, and half a funny movie is better than none.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A mediocre production that nevertheless will strike a deep and resonant chord with viewers.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    There are a number of surprises in the idiosyncratic film, and one of its pleasures is the oblique and unchronological way in which Ward peels away the layers of the story, flashing backward and forward in time and jumping between Earth and the Beyond, separating his scenes with blindingly blank, white-out screens.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Feels like a hazy high that takes too long to shake.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end Monsieur N. could use a little less cloak-and-dagger and more of what made "The Emperor's New Clothes" work, i.e., heart.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the unforced humor and honesty in the performances of its young and talented cast, The Wood spends too much time wallowing in arrested adolescence to make you feel you've traveled anywhere.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A well-crafted story with a unique voice. But its literary gifts are outweighed by its pictorial prosaicness. Dimming the screen in every shot is the unmistakable shadow of the page.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite this tale's surface sheen and propulsive momentum, it never transports one very far.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The smart but slight film implodes under the weight of its own "excessive linguistic pressure."
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's no worse than any number of other cookie-cutter slasher flicks geared for the slightly post-pubescent market.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's effectively frightening. It's just not the kind of frightening that stays with you very long, unless of course someone decides to make the same movie . . . yet again.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's actually a lot going on in this little movie, and first-time feature director Stephen Daldry, turning his talents from the theater, handles all of it deftly.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    What modest pleasure the film affords is largely thanks to the charisma of its genial stars.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Plays like a piece of mediocre music, gorgeously rendered.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    That script – co-written by Terry Hayes and director Brian Helgeland – is almost too noir for its own good at times, but Gibson somehow manages to pull its implausibility off.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    In trying to compose a poetic love letter to a time of liberation and freedom, Haynes has merely conjured up memories of druggy excess, egotism and tight trousers. The only mementos worth saving from the experience are available on the soundtrack.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although Monkeybone will undoubtedly make you laugh at its slapstick highjinks, the irony is that for a movie that's ultimately about soul, that's the one commodity that's in precious short supply up on the screen.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie is pretty unabashed about the all-but-corny sentiment: Each of us has something to give.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    As a rule, the drawn and computer-animated imagery is top notch and seamlessly integrated, but the central characters' tawny complexions and the often chiaroscuro lighting sometimes obscure all but the whites of their eyes and their pearl-perfect teeth.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Meet Joe Black is Hopkins's movie and, despite the film's unnecessary length, his quiet and dignified performance almost carries the ball across the finish line.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's the Weather Channel on steroids.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film as a whole, while possessing a kind of vicious beauty, feels as cold and as embalmed as a corpse.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A generally well-made tale of humor and hard luck.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A tad preachy and more than a little bit sanctimonious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A jaundiced view of litigation, however authentic, is not necessarily the stuff of great drama, even of the legal-thriller variety, which by definition is confined to a claustrophobic courtroom.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Charming but slight comedy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    If these repugnant people were really your friends and neighbors, your time would be more profitably spent reading the real estate listings than the movie reviews. But for 1 1/2 hours in a darkened theater, the derailment of their unhealthy emotions makes for one compulsively watchable train wreck.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Yes, Knowing is creepy, at least for the first two-thirds or so, in a moderately satisfying, if predictable, way.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The kind of stunning and contentious work of art that will leave a lot of folks speechless.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Where Town and Country gets really good and weird – and I do mean good – is only after about an hour into it in deepest, darkest Idaho.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Overwhelmingly predictable despite its cute surprise ending, Tortilla Soup is a filling but unoriginal dish.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Charming but slight.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a pretty compelling yarn, not to mention full of pretty pictures, and yet it could be so much more than that.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a lot more tightly focused than the first outing, and for fans of the demented comedy of Elliott and Cross, or the thespian chops of Woods (a last-minute replacement for an ailing Marlon Brando), it's worth putting up with humor that's the filmic equivalent of a big, spit-soaked raspberry.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Make no mistake. This is partisan filmmaking at its most gleefully unapologetic. Unless they're also masochists, Bill Clinton haters and Ken Starr fans will know better than to buy a ticket.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's something that never quite works about the film.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Satisfies and disturbs in just about equal measure.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It is also, despite the all-too-rare focus on the Filipino American community, a creakily familiar take on an age-old family dynamic.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Cares not a whit for such arbitrary concepts as justice, crime or punishment. It understands the relativism of right and wrong and takes a kind of perverse pleasure in reminding us that there are some things we'll never know.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Sappy but sweet B-ball Cinderella story that succeeds thanks largely to the outsize charm of its 4-foot-8-inch, corn-rowed protagonist.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Presents an America that is as much about the pathological display of imperial power -- a showmanship of arrogance and violence -- as policy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Blade's stomach-turning special effects, bone-crunching martial arts and cynical humor will more than satisfy any action-film addict's need for a fix of eye-popping escapist adrenaline.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    Fitfully amusing and ultimately kind of heartwarming in a twisted sort of way
    • 30 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A considerable cut above the crop of recent features by other 'SNL' alums.
    • Washington Post
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    If Guess Who were either a whole lot funnier, or a whole lot less funny, it would be a far better film.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    It is this sense of real life blurring with make-believe that Allen's film is really playing with, like a kitten toying with a scared mouse. Back and forth he bats the subject, moving between reality, illusion and the imitation of reality with a deft touch that may bruise but never kills.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    A blackhearted little film. What's being marketed as a frothy French confection about jealousy (specifically the jealousy of a regular guy married to a famous movie star) also just so happens to be a portrait of a marriage going down the toilet.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Michael O'Sullivan
    The pleasure is entirely like eating cake made from cake mix. It's not like you don't know how it's going to turn out, or how it tasted the last time you ate it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Now for the bad news. The filmmakers seem to have spent so much attention and, presumably, money on getting the primates right that they completely forgot about the people.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s Rainn Wilson who steals the show as the cocky physical education teacher who takes charge when the pint-size monsters corner him and his fellow educators.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The overly schematic nature of High-Rise does not entirely diminish its pleasures as a story, which include, in addition to Wheatley’s richly lurid visual sensibility, an effective metaphorical tool in Laing.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a rousing, fast-paced tale, told with a modicum of verve and packed with colorfully flawed, occasionally heroic and even tragic characters. It also feels disappointingly bloated and too fast-paced by half.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Based on "Romeo and Juliet" the way a martini is "based" on vermouth.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In order for the trick of the film to work, however, one must hold Morgan to a standard that the movie is unlikely to live up to.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    As large as Earth Two looms - literally - in the frames of Mike Cahill's film, so do its implications. It's one big, honking metaphor, as much as a special effect. As a symbol of second chances, it's as intriguing as it is frustratingly obvious.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Just inspiring enough, just scary enough, just sappy enough and just funny enough to get by.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Jason Bourne belongs to Damon and Greengrass, whose admirable — and entirely appropriate — goal of playing it for kicks comes across, this time around, as an oddly joyless chore.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Even if you agree with the film’s argument that teenagers shouldn’t be locked up for life when there are other ways to save them, “Monsters” doesn’t offer a convincing argument that a screenwriting class is that lifeline.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Director James Watkins knows how to make a body jump out of its skin, even if he does use the face-reflected-in-the-mirror/window trick once too often. At the same time, the film is kind of, well, silly.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end, The Devil's Double is one long balance sheet. On the plus side are the dueling performances of Cooper, which anchor the film. On the minus side is a seemingly interminable litany of violence, abuse and degradation. They cheapen the film by nudging it in the direction of a splatter flick.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    For all the outrageousness of Kevin’s alters, the movie falls oddly flat: less tantalizingly enigmatic “et cetera” than “blah blah blah.”
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's like a PBS version of a movie of the week about child abduction, complete with histrionic, spit-flecked speechifying in quaint Irish brogues.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Disorder is, in other words, more of a technical achievement than an artistic one. The movie is at its best when it recreates what it must feel like to be in a constant state of paranoia and pain. If only that feeling were accompanied by one or two other emotions.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the marquee names and their obvious talent, the film feels like a made-for-TV movie. It’s slight and episodic, with a weirdly scrupulous ambivalence about its subject, whom it seems torn between loving and loathing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Although laced with adrenaline and flavored with noirish seasoning, John Frankenheimer's Ronin is a disappointingly conventional thriller.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Controversial, yet undeniably powerful.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film's title suggests the wry irony of hindsight: We've come a long way, baby, but we're not there yet. Any Day Now could do with a little more of that astringent humor and a little less sap.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Goes beyond interesting, though, to moderately annoying.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There are a few laughs here and there. Most come at the expense of Ferrell, who plays the kind of hapless (and occasionally shirtless) straight arrow that the actor could turn out in his sleep.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A compelling if singularly sour tale.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Scares, to be sure, which is certainly one promise on which it delivers. But the film offers little insight into what it seems to be saying is essentially a mundane fact of life: When one devil leaves the world, there is always another one waiting just outside the door.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Joy
    Even Lawrence, in the end, is a letdown. As entertaining and committed as she is — and she’s easily the best thing about Joy — the actress ultimately can’t sell a souffle that’s half baked.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Dear Nicholas Sparks, There's no easy way to say this. But with Dear John, the latest of the five films made so far from your sentimental, best-selling novels, I think our relationship is in trouble.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s incrementally more fun than it is silly.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Even as Brick Lane manages to sidestep one formula, it falls prey to another.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The problem, sadly, is that the whole amounts to less than the sum of its parts.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film’s steady accumulation of little quirks... soon grow tedious. After a while they’re less delightfully oddball touches with a promise of more to come than dead weight with no payoff.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The dialogue in San Andreas is lame, its plot both predictable and implausible, and the character development beside the point. Even Dwayne Johnson, that force of cinematic nature and rock-ribbed charisma, doesn’t have enough charm to dig this mess of a movie out of the rubble of cliche it’s buried in.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    If you go in with the right attitude, there’s a fair amount of fun to be had from In Secret, considering it’s a musty French costume drama done in plummy English accents.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    With a surprisingly unhappy, anti-Hollywood ending that will appeal to those who like things dark.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Bizarre yet popular.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    I love a good story, too, but I prefer one that actually goes somewhere (although, as joy rides to nowhere are concerned, this one is a beaut).
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    American Ultra has a clever premise. But it misses several opportunities to at least comment on, if not skewer, the spy movies that it only halfheartedly pokes fun at. As it is, it’s content to generate a low-grade buzz, rather than deliver a true high.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a case of the heart being in the right place, but the script getting in the way.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Hiddleston steals the show here, making wickedness and treachery look a heck of a lot more fun than virtue.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film actually gets to tackle some larger questions than one normally finds in the average fireball drama.
    • Washington Post
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    At times, it's downright nasty; and that's when I like it best.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like Affleck himself, the film is perfectly satisfactory without being deeply satisfying.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    However many millions of dollars Rodriguez set aside for blanks and exploding squibs was a waste. Depp's salary, on the other hand, was money well spent.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Buffed and waxed to within an inch of its life, Stella registers as more of a sequence of slick commercials than an actual drama.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Prime Ministers: The Pioneers is hampered by a static structure that relies too heavily on a single voice.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    During the movie's awww-inducing conclusion, those of you who are allergic to cuteness - or to Jim Carrey - might want to look away.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Sure, there’s an undeniable pleasure from watching Pacino and Hunter work the screen, but the syrupy, symbol-heavy script by first-time feature writer Paul Logan is weighed down further by cliches and false notes.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's lots of extraneous plotting -- which, however fact based, is handled in such a pre-fab manner that it feels phony.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In the end, what mars "Timothy Green" most is its middle-of-the-road approach. Its appealingly quirky, fairy-tale-like center is so coated with sugar, it cloys. It's not that "Timothy Green" is odd, but that it isn't odd enough.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Smashed never really rises much above the level of a dramatic public service announcement. That's not so much because of its tone, but because what it's announcing isn't exactly news. Alcoholism is a disease. Alcoholics aren't bad people. Quitting is hard.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's alternately monotonous, hot and dramatic, which makes for a peculiar, not entirely unsatisfying atmosphere of neo -- or is that post? -- noir. What it all means, of course, I have no idea.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Life of Crime feels like a rambling car ride through the countryside with friends. The scenery is great, and the passengers are diverting, but you keep wondering where the driver is headed.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Isn’t Statham’s best — or most brutal — work, but it’s not bad.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A great performance does not necessarily make for great tragedy, and Christine remains mired in the minutiae of its portrait of a doomed, bitter young woman.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Watchable, if cliched.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie is as damnably perplexing as the subject himself.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The effects are effective. The humor is humorous and just self-referential enough to let you know the film doesn't take itself too seriously.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Does Lurie have an ax to grind? And how. Yet if, to some ears, its high-pitched whine nearly drowns out the underlying story at times, why did so many in that preview audience seem deaf to it? Maybe that's Lurie's real point: A culture that feeds on violence -- in real life and on film -- has also inured us to it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A fable that is by turns antic, scary, sweet and, in the end, slightly soulless. In other words, it's a heartwarmer that doesn't have much of a heart itself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It does exactly what its subject didn’t do: toe the line.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    For those so inclined, it's nice to see the girl and the gangsta -- not the gunslinger -- save the day.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The derriere-flashing, dope-smoking, potty-mouthed antics of this antisocial E.T. justify every bit of the rating that the MPAA has slapped on him.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Land of the Dead is fairly intense. Intensely gory and violent, that is, as has come to be expected from the genre. It's just not very frightening. Not half as frightening as, say, last year's "Dawn of the Dead."
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is not without its pleasures. Kidman and Firth lend the pulpy material a certain prestige, even if Strong comes across as simply another plot device (and a perplexing one at that).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    And that's the moral of this story. Or one of them, anyway. Clash's success is shown as the result of a combination of talent, gumption, pluck, misadventure, supportive parents, following your dreams, luck and, yes, love.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's an infusion of zip that's sorely needed, because the chief deficiency of A Bug's Life so far is its blandness….The film's other weakness is the low-octane vocal performances of its leading cast.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The most ironic thing about Gold is this: For all its efforts, the movie seems to know it’s sitting on a gold mine of a backstory, but it just can’t figure out how to get the stuff out of the ground.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Gripping, if manipulative and somewhat preposterous, drama.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Call it a Christmas miracle, albeit a minor one: Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel isn't entirely awful.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The purpose of A Dog’s Purpose isn’t to solve philosophical riddles but to warm the cockles of dog lovers’ hearts. That, it does — as well as a wet kiss from a slobbery tongue can.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In Upside Down, writer-director Juan Solanas takes the gimmick about as far as it can go, rendering the metaphor of longing and separation in effective, and richly visual, terms. If anything, however, he goes too far.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Miss Julie is a strangely clinical movie experience. It’s a story that makes an impression without leaving a mark.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Lords of Dogtown isn't a cop-out, but rather an ever-so-slight concession to commercialism.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The plot itself is predictably divorced from reality, containing more holes — and smelling staler — than month-old Swiss cheese. All of which means that Stallone and Schwarzenegger end up having to do all the heavy lifting.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A mite too hard to follow for most of the kiddie crowd who'll want to see it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A martial-arts ad­ven­ture with more video-game and comic-book DNA than the traditional kung fu flick, Tai Chi Zero is good, if empty-headed, fun.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    You'd never know it from the innocuous-looking trailers, but Home Fries is really "When Dorian Met Sally" meets "Psycho."
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a hyper-violent buddy comedy. If you like that sort of thing -- think "Training Day," with laughs -- you'll love this.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's tasty enough, and probably good for you, but at 73 minutes, the film is hardly a very filling entree.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Does it matter that Maggie might be a charlatan if she's truly capable of helping people? That's the film's most intriguing, and open-ended, question - not the more gimmicky one that will leave you hanging, and probably disappointed, at the end.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The singer-actress has screen presence to spare and a nice, rich voice. By the time her young fans outgrow her -- or she them -- she should have an excellent chance at a second career. Making, you know, real movies and real music.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is less a look into the Fed’s head than a presentation of its history, going back even farther than its creation in 1913, in response to a series of early 20th-century banking panics.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The bigger mystery is whether the models actually work. Though the Armstrong partisans in the film strongly suggest that they do, director Marcus Vetter struggles to convince the lay viewer.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A misbegotten marriage of sweet and sour.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It starts out with a tsunami - and ends up standing in a puddle.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The first dumb-fun action movie of the summer season has arrived early with The Losers, a loud, loving homage to guns and testosterone based on a series of comic books about a renegade band of CIA operatives. How dumb is it? You might actually kill a few million brain cells just watching it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Let Me In wants to make your flesh crawl, and it probably will. But it's unlikely to ever get under anyone's skin, the way "Let the Right One In" did.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The bad news is that the opening credits, which make sick and darkly comic allusions to suicide, are the best thing about the film.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Sunset Song is a gritty and gorgeous film. Perhaps a little too gorgeous, in fact, and not gritty enough.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There’s a little too much happening in the film’s violent, frenetic conclusion, which involves the retrieval of fractured memories, the confession of betrayals and so many narrative loops within loops that the film’s big reveals never make perfect, deeply satisfying sense. Maybe it’s not supposed to.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The question isn't whether Toys in the Attic is any good. The question is: good for whom?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Without at least the tawdry pleasure of a little bodice ripping, the film moves along sluggishly, even though it is well acted and handsomely shot.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Much of the film's humor hovers around crotch level. If jokes about mental illness, terminal disease and sex with orangutans sound funny to you, go for it.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film dutifully cleaves to the contours of a well-established and viscerally satisfying formula.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    As messages go, I've certainly heard worse. As movies go, Wimbledon is a generally painless float down a lazy river.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a pretty scathing satire of reality TV, including itself, which makes it both what it is, and a critique of what it is.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Storks delivers its package, but it’s a bundle of just-okay, not joy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    As far-fetched as it sounds, such torque-y plotting works, catching the audience off guard, even if the quasi-feminist payoff is less satisfying than it should be, thanks mostly to the film’s puerile fascination with girl-on-girl action.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Tries to cram too many ingredients into one small pot.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    What really sells this three-hanky tear-jerker -- and there were a lot of women buying it during a recent screening -- is Lane's steely and vulnerable performance. Like Tinker Bell, she almost made me believe in fairies. Almost.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A love boat afloat on the vast cinematic ocean that sloshes back and forth between the stinko and the fabulous.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    If it touches on notions of scientific arrogance and the question of what makes us human, it ultimately does so lightly, and with a mix of eye-popping action and loopy good humor.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie isn't exactly full of twists and turns, but neither is it a long, hard slog.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The characters in Aloft seem to float over their strong passions, like birds riding on columns of air, without ever alighting. I kept waiting for the sharp sting of a talon to take hold of my heart, but it never came.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Even if you’ve never heard any of this back story — let alone anything about Mine That Bird — the outcome of the film is never seriously in doubt. That leaves filmmaker Jim Wilson in the predicament of having to entertain us by showing how the horse and his handlers get their act together. Unfortunately, 50 to 1 never really does that.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Man Who Knew Infinity tells a great story. It’s just that it’s a little too by-the-book to make anything other than a so-so movie.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In structure and concept, the film resembles the faux-documentary “Borat,” with the distinction that the cameras here are all hidden. And that is where the film falls down and can’t get up.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It will put some viewers in mind of yet another story with the same theme: "Pinocchio."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's more waiting than lightning in Waiting for Lightning, a nonetheless watchable-enough documentary about the preparations leading up to professional skateboarder Danny Way's historic 2005 attempt to sail over the Great Wall of China on a skateboard.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Except for the last five minutes, Robin Hood is the story of the radicalization of some guy named Longstride. Who?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    All in all, Jack Goes Boating is an auspicious -- if slightly ostentatious -- debut by Hoffman, one of today's greatest actors. Maybe next time his performance in front of his camera will be as subtle as his performance behind it.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    When it is good, the film by "Chicago Hope" actor Peter Berg is very, very good, but when it is bad it is horrid.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's the sick humor that's most appealing about this odd little Danish film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    This slight but insinuating documentary by Abbas Kiarostami...will do nothing to advance or detract from the reputation of the acclaimed Iranian filmmaker.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The franchise is cheapened by Disney's crass commercialism in releasing material that, by rights, should have gone straight to video.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the vastly improved visuals, the new film is just as soft-hearted — and, unfortunately, just as mush-headed — as the earlier one.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite its earnestness and valuable lessons, however, "Blood" feels a little like preaching to the choir.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The humor is generic. And the film’s most obvious comparison — it’s been called “Toy Story” with animals — only points up the one thing “Pets” lacks, and that any animal lover will tell you their furred and feathered friends have, in spades: personality.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The odd and disturbing thing about the film is just how comfortable [Mancini] — and we — have become putting moments on camera that, once upon a time, were meant to be shared between two people.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Berry’s performance, although less campy and histrionic than the trailer makes it look, is still outsize in proportion to the material, which feels slight and insubstantial despite its basis in a true story.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like Father, Like Son grows on you, subtly and over time. Just as with the unexpected realignments forced on its characters, it may be difficult to fall in love with the movie, but eventually you do warm up to it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    His screenplay for Beautiful Creatures is sharp and witty, considering the needlessly complicated source material. His cast is stellar, and the chemistry between his young stars magical. But too much of rest of the movie, like Thompson’s monstrous mother, is an unholy mess.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite some cool camera work and the kind of noir-lite moral ambiguity that barely gets your shoes dirty (courtesy of a shallow script by Brad “Out of the Furnace” Ingelsby), the movie is the cinematic equivalent of junk food. It satisfies the craving for the sensation of nihilism, without its substance.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's nothing terribly surprising about Special Forces, a moderately gripping action flick about a group of commandos on a mission to rescue a pretty blonde who has been abducted by the Taliban. Nothing, that is, except that it's French.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Just because it's a good idea doesn't mean it's easy to do well. Screenwriter-turned-director Kurt Wimmer has a hard time keeping his actors from, well, acting a lot of the time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    And, yes, Kung Fu Panda 2 is a little darker and a little more intense than the first film, especially for very young viewers.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It isn't that Bobby Jones is especially bad. It's just not especially good, either.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    This is a sophisticated movie, but one whose sophistication is surprisingly simple-minded.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is full of quiet little truths.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    They're enough to elevate the film above its somewhat by-the-numbers plot and add a little juice to its slightly sluggish forward momentum.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's a light and breezy, recession-themed romantic comedy; "Up in the Air" without all the angst and introspection.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie builds a moderate, if less than monumental, level of spookiness, regardless of your ignorance. It’s a workmanlike piece of suspense.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite some Cold War humor, the formulaic film is aimed squarely at the youngest of young children.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Broad and cheesy, yet it is not utterly without a kind of junk-food appeal.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    When Miss You Already works, it’s because of the cast.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The unsatisfying thriller A Perfect Murder is a triumph of style over substance, with style in this case winning only by default.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Parker the movie, like the man, delivers exactly as promised.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Aficionados of gore and guts may not mind the comfortably lived-in feel of this blood-spattered Green Room. But anyone looking for the ferocious originality, and unexpected humanity, of “Blue Ruin” will be disappointed by Saulnier’s uninspired cover version of a song we all know.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie suffers by taking itself a little too seriously. It's not just that it's a lot less funny than the book. It's also a lot less fun.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The mixture of tension, yuks and horrific violence at times reminds one of nothing more than a poor man's "Pulp Fiction."
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Not quite documentary, yet by no means drama, Inside the Mind of Leonardo is what might be called poetic biography: maddeningly fragmentary and idiosyncratic, but 100 percent true.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's a visceral, albeit somewhat goofy, satisfaction to this stuff.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A slightly soggy tale of father-son bonding, crossed with an action-adventure flick about high-tech battle-bots.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film isn’t bad, although it is somewhat repetitive. If it has plot holes, conceptual laziness and an overreliance on dumb-insult humor, the film at least seems to know it. There are lots of self-referential jokes that acknowledge its own stupidity.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The comedy about a coterie of high school seniors plotting to steal the answers to the dreaded standardized test talks a pretty good game, but in the end the numbers just don't add up to much.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Though Ouija starts off evoking a nicely eerie atmosphere of dread, it ultimately goes too far, making the liminal space between the spirit world and this one all too eye-rollingly literal.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film does not jerk tears as much as it knocks you down and runs away with them.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie itself is a tad overheated. In the lurid, swampy, yet almost perversely engrossing follow-up to director Lee Daniels's "Precious," the temperature is set to "sizzle." Ironically, it could have used a little more time in the oven.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    When the jokes work, it's for a simple reason: The four actors playing the couples are seasoned veterans of film comedy (although each is more than capable of handling dramatic roles, as well).
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Beltrn, for his part, makes a solidly believable Garca Lorca. The problem is with the man with whom he's obsessed. In Pattinson's performance, we never see what Garca Lorca sees in Dal.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Hardy is extraordinarily good at evoking the fraught fraternal connection between the Krays.... But the film is ultimately unable to plumb the Krays’ deepest souls, if they even have any.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    As Kaulder, Diesel does what he does, rumbling out lines of silly dialogue in his subwoofer of a voice. As far as acting goes, there’s not much.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The sense of goofy, if gory, good humor [Copley] brings to Hardcore Henry goes a long way toward mitigating the film’s tedious barbarity.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    This adaptation of Agota Kristof’s 1986 novel is impossible to take literally, yet too obscure to read between the lines.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Artist and the Model isn’t about much, other than female beauty. That theme is not exactly controversial. Chalk the tameness of the subject matter up to the period in which the film is set.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    More stomach-churning than soul-chilling. The list of on-screen atrocities includes attacks by nail gun, electric carving knife, chain saw, shotgun, crowbar and chunk of ceramic from a broken toilet tank, used as a crude bludgeon.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's just that, in this world of clanking, hissing machines, even the people seem like robots.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Plays more like a philosophical debate than a war drama.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    This Window ultimately feels like one most of us have climbed through before.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There just aren't many laughs in this slack dramedy, and what yuks there are are fairly low-wattage.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Emphasizes action and eye-popping visuals over emotion.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A startlingly inappropriate tragedy in the final act drives home the film’s pacifist message, while virtually ensuring that the youngest and most sensitive viewers will be left in a puddle of tears.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Rollicks and rolls, thanks mainly to Roth's over-the-top depravity and Xiong's swingin', "Crouching Tiger"-style choreography.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    For all its well-drawn lines between good and evil, Four Brothers is ultimately passive entertainment.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Derivative dumpling of a romantic comedy about Irish sexuality.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Entertaining enough for the trick-or-treat crowd, but a bit more bite wouldn't kill it.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    A fun if dumb movie.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Ultimately, the problem with this Red Dawn is the same problem with the first one. Despite the more realistic battle scenes, nothing in it feels more fateful than a football game.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Wants to be about life, death and the red liquid that flows beneath our skin. It ends up being more about stage blood and stupid plot tricks.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The relationship is the best thing about the film, which otherwise feels hopelessly sad and tawdry.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Unfortunately, Nair's film doesn't so much end as fall off a cliff, the ultimate victim of viewers' heightened expectations that this briskly paced story will take them someplace -- other than around the block in a horse-drawn carriage.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie Vulgaria is not one for the kiddies. Then again, the description "for mature audiences" doesn't seem right either. The Hong Kong comedy, a broad, cartoonish -- and decidedly filthy -- satire of moviemaking is as sophomoric as they come. It's also pretty funny, in an unapologetically over-the-top way.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Telegraphs its every move. There are simply no surprises.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Still, what separates Walking With Destiny from a run-of-the-mill war documentary isn't necessarily its insights into its main subject but its tangential stories about fascinating nobodies.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There remains a maddening emptiness where the film's ostensible subject should be.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    At times, the movie has the look and feel of the cheaply made late-night commercials that it mercilessly, and occasionally hilariously, mocks.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    This fairy-tale shtick, even when dressed up with a little class-war garnish, is hard to swallow.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie by Jean-Pierre Améris milks the tears in the home stretch, making little effort to hold the melodrama at bay. The result is a story that everyone can feel great about feeling terrible about.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The lens through which the The Intouchables was filmed may be too rose-colored for some people's taste, but the window that these talented performers throw open -- a window onto the strange and touching friendship between two very different men -- is crystal clear.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Nina filters the singer’s voice — and her life — through tinny-sounding speakers and an out-of-focus lens.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Plays less like a conventional medical thriller - think "Outbreak" - than like a dramatic reading of a "Nova" episode, performed by Hollywood's elite.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Preaches most effectively to the converted.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Crafted by writer-director Jill Sprecher and co-writer sister Karen - a filmmaking duo who are sometimes jokingly referred to as the "Coen sisters" - it will erase any lingering memories of "Fargo."
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s not a bad movie. It’s like several pretty good ones.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Alex Cross isn't meant to be analyzed too deeply. The title character probably sums up the best strategy for appreciating the film's modest pleasures when he says, "Don't overthink it; I'm just looking for a bad guy."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Its one-sidedness flirts with propaganda.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It never really feels like we've gotten to know the man himself, leaving the figure at the heart of I'll Sing for You a cipher.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Strikes several beautiful and lingering chords about the human condition, but the notes of the music ultimately never come together to form a coherent song.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    My All American plays like an extended highlights reel, not a movie.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a movie about exploring the vast, “dark continent” of the ocean’s deepest places (to quote Cameron, who produced and narrates the film) that ends up feeling claustrophobic. Much of it was shot inside a metal sphere the size of a fitness ball.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Overlong, unnecessarily sex-obsessed and downright nasty at times, This Is 40 feels haphazard and unfinished, despite a few moments of laugh-out-loud humor.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There's plenty to scratch your head about here. Is it a drama? A comedy? And if it's a farce, what's it making fun of?
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Those who are only mildly curious, I fear, will be put to sleep or bewildered by the artsy and often pointless visuals.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away has plenty of eye candy... What the movie lacks, unfortunately, is coherence.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It's not brilliant by any means, but bright enough to light up an overly familiar feel-good story.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There is still a self-consciousness and a forced quality to much of the humor that this TPT redux just can't shake.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Just when you’re about to write off your investment in Criminal Activities, the third-act dividend pays off, in spades.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There are worse things than being trapped inside a computer game with Olivia Wilde. In Tron: Legacy, the loud, long and less than wholly satisfying sequel to "Tron," that's the bittersweet fate of Kevin Flynn (Jeff Bridges), the computer-nerd hero of both the 1982 sci-fi cult classic and its high-tech, 3-D update.

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