Michael O'Sullivan

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For 1,327 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Michael O'Sullivan's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 59
Highest review score: 100 A Simple Plan
Lowest review score: 0 Lethal Weapon 4
Score distribution:
1327 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film's title suggests the wry irony of hindsight: We've come a long way, baby, but we're not there yet. Any Day Now could do with a little more of that astringent humor and a little less sap.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Overlong, unnecessarily sex-obsessed and downright nasty at times, This Is 40 feels haphazard and unfinished, despite a few moments of laugh-out-loud humor.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Cirque du Soleil: Worlds Away has plenty of eye candy... What the movie lacks, unfortunately, is coherence.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Parker the movie, like the man, delivers exactly as promised.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    His screenplay for Beautiful Creatures is sharp and witty, considering the needlessly complicated source material. His cast is stellar, and the chemistry between his young stars magical. But too much of rest of the movie, like Thompson’s monstrous mother, is an unholy mess.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The movie builds a moderate, if less than monumental, level of spookiness, regardless of your ignorance. It’s a workmanlike piece of suspense.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In Upside Down, writer-director Juan Solanas takes the gimmick about as far as it can go, rendering the metaphor of longing and separation in effective, and richly visual, terms. If anything, however, he goes too far.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    More stomach-churning than soul-chilling. The list of on-screen atrocities includes attacks by nail gun, electric carving knife, chain saw, shotgun, crowbar and chunk of ceramic from a broken toilet tank, used as a crude bludgeon.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    There’s a little too much happening in the film’s violent, frenetic conclusion, which involves the retrieval of fractured memories, the confession of betrayals and so many narrative loops within loops that the film’s big reveals never make perfect, deeply satisfying sense. Maybe it’s not supposed to.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The people of 2022 may “release the beast” by slaughtering their fellow Americans. In 2013, that’s still what we go to the movies for.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The odd and disturbing thing about the film is just how comfortable [Mancini] — and we — have become putting moments on camera that, once upon a time, were meant to be shared between two people.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Artist and the Model isn’t about much, other than female beauty. That theme is not exactly controversial. Chalk the tameness of the subject matter up to the period in which the film is set.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Despite the marquee names and their obvious talent, the film feels like a made-for-TV movie. It’s slight and episodic, with a weirdly scrupulous ambivalence about its subject, whom it seems torn between loving and loathing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The film is less a look into the Fed’s head than a presentation of its history, going back even farther than its creation in 1913, in response to a series of early 20th-century banking panics.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The plot itself is predictably divorced from reality, containing more holes — and smelling staler — than month-old Swiss cheese. All of which means that Stallone and Schwarzenegger end up having to do all the heavy lifting.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    In structure and concept, the film resembles the faux-documentary “Borat,” with the distinction that the cameras here are all hidden. And that is where the film falls down and can’t get up.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Hiddleston steals the show here, making wickedness and treachery look a heck of a lot more fun than virtue.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Concussion suffers from a chilly detachment that feels all too clinical, when all we want, like Abby, is connection.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Isn’t Statham’s best — or most brutal — work, but it’s not bad.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    If it touches on notions of scientific arrogance and the question of what makes us human, it ultimately does so lightly, and with a mix of eye-popping action and loopy good humor.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Like Father, Like Son grows on you, subtly and over time. Just as with the unexpected realignments forced on its characters, it may be difficult to fall in love with the movie, but eventually you do warm up to it.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    If you go in with the right attitude, there’s a fair amount of fun to be had from In Secret, considering it’s a musty French costume drama done in plummy English accents.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    The Prime Ministers: The Pioneers is hampered by a static structure that relies too heavily on a single voice.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Berry’s performance, although less campy and histrionic than the trailer makes it look, is still outsize in proportion to the material, which feels slight and insubstantial despite its basis in a true story.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Even if you’ve never heard any of this back story — let alone anything about Mine That Bird — the outcome of the film is never seriously in doubt. That leaves filmmaker Jim Wilson in the predicament of having to entertain us by showing how the horse and his handlers get their act together. Unfortunately, 50 to 1 never really does that.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It does exactly what its subject didn’t do: toe the line.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    It’s a movie about exploring the vast, “dark continent” of the ocean’s deepest places (to quote Cameron, who produced and narrates the film) that ends up feeling claustrophobic. Much of it was shot inside a metal sphere the size of a fitness ball.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Life of Crime feels like a rambling car ride through the countryside with friends. The scenery is great, and the passengers are diverting, but you keep wondering where the driver is headed.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    This adaptation of Agota Kristof’s 1986 novel is impossible to take literally, yet too obscure to read between the lines.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Michael O'Sullivan
    Though Ouija starts off evoking a nicely eerie atmosphere of dread, it ultimately goes too far, making the liminal space between the spirit world and this one all too eye-rollingly literal.

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